Pivotal Conversations: How microservices enable DevOps, with Josh Long by Pivotal Conversations

It was a pretty good episode:

In preparation for his DevOpsDays Atlanta talk, Josh and Coté (well, mostly Coté) talk about the relationship between microservices and DevOps. They use the CAMS framing to go over how microservices could provide the architectural requirements to make DevOps possible.

Vanguard’s thinking on microservices

Breaking up the monolith with good, old fashioned, OO-think:

Instead, Vanguard has begun a journey to break apart our monolithic legacy systems piece-by-piece by replacing them with microservices over time. With a microservices architecture, we remove the business logic and data logic from our applications and replace it with a set of re-usable modules of code that are built and deployed as independent entities. We then compliment this architecture by chunking out our user interfaces into modular purpose-built components.

De-coupling for stability and resiliency, among other things:

This service-based approach to application architecture provides a variety of advantages over the jumble of code that defines a non-modular monolithic application. First, services reduce redundancy by making sure there is only one copy of application logic for a given capability – regardless of how many applications leverage that logic. In the long run, this leads to lower development costs and increases speed to market. Second, since these services are deployed independently and built in a resilient manner, outages in one area of an application are less likely to bring down an entire system. In some instances, several of our services can be down without our clients being aware of a loss in functionality thanks to the ability of our applications to automatically react to a service that isn’t available. Finally, services enable our applications to scale easier. The marriage of cloud and services means we can quickly spin up infrastructure to handle surges in the number of transactions we need to handle without needing to scale up an entire application.

Vanguard CIO: Why we’re on a journey to evolve to a microservices architecture

Questioning DRY

tl;dr

Recently, I’ve been in conversations where people throw some doubt on DRY. In the cloud native, microservices mode of operating where independent teams are chugging along, mostly decoupled from other teams, duplicating code and functionality tends to come more naturally, even necessarily. And the benefits of DRY (reuse and reducing bugs/inconstancy from multiple implementation of the same thing), theoretically, no longer are more valuable than the effort put into DRYing off.

That’s the theory a handful of people are floating, at least. I have no idea if it’s true. DRY is such an unquestionable tenant of all programming think that it’s worth tracking it’s validity as new modes of application development and deployment are hammered out. Catching when old taboos flip to new truths is always handy.
Continue reading Questioning DRY

The life of microservices in the F500 – Lords of Computing Podcast

Summary

You don’t hear too many stories about microservices in “normal” companies. In this episode, I talk with Nate Foreman about microservices-driven work he’s been doing with a large enterprise recently. We discuss the goods and the bads of this approach and, overall, how it’s working out. It’s a good discussion of how all the usual “cloud native” concept actually play out in the real world.

(As you can guess, it’s not actually an “action figure” company, we just used that example to mask the actual company.)

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Show-notes and Links

040: Software is awesome – Software Defined Talk

Summary

When you can pay the sprinkler repair guy by using your finger to sign an iPad, things are looking up. Maybe it means we’ll have lots of microservices wrapped around government services, who knows. Also, we cover the strategy of choosing boring technologies, MongoDB, and The EMC Federation.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

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Show notes

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in podcast

Recommendations

Five Things You Need To Know About Microservices | EMCInFocus

“For those not familiar with the concept, microservices is essentially a software architectural design pattern. The fundamental premise of microservices is that value can be unlocked through decomposing large, monolithic legacy applications into a set of small independent, composable services that each can be accessed via RESTful APIs.”

Five Things You Need To Know About Microservices | EMCInFocus