Link: Q&A on the Book Agile Management

“Most of the available maturity models measure the degree to which the agile techniques and tools are deployed. I prefer to look at it from a different angle. First, define what your most important performance indicators are with respect to agility. For instance, time-to-market, employee satisfaction, customer satisfaction, and so on. Then benchmark these, if possible. And also follow their development over time, to determine whether they are improving or not.”
Original source: Q&A on the Book Agile Management

Link: How to build a business case for DevOps transformation

“Here are a few signs that your company should consider transitioning to DevOps:

Does it take a long time to deliver features?
Are features underutilized?
Do you not know the utilization of features?
Do you have downtime during maintenance or deployment windows?
Do your customers tell you your site is down before you know it?
Do outages occur repeatedly for the same reason?
Are customer feature requests implemented in a way that doesn’t actually fulfill the customer’s needs?”

Original source: How to build a business case for DevOps transformation

Good, simple explanation of Service Level Objectives (SLOs)

SLOs are objectives that your business aspires to meet and intends to take action to defend; just remember, your SLOs are not your SLAs (service level agreements)! You should pick SLOs that represent the most critical aspects of the user experience. If you meet an SLO, your users and your business should be happy. Conversely, if the system does not meet the SLO, that implies there are users who are being made unhappy!

Source: Building good SLOs – CRE life lessons

Core DevOps (tech) metrics, from Nicole Forsgren

Everyone always wants to know metrics. While the answer is always a solid “it depends – I mean, what are your business goals and then we can come up with some KPIs,” there’s a reoccurring set of technical metrics. Nicole lists some off:

These IT performance metrics capture speed and stability of software delivery: lead time for changes (from code commit to code deploy), deployment frequency, mean time to restore (MTTR), and change fail rate. It’s important to capture all of these because they are in tension with each other (speaking to both speed and stability, reflecting priorities of both the dev and ops sides of the team), and they reflect overall goals of the team. These metrics as a whole have also been shown to drive organizational performance.

And, then, further summarized by Daniel Bryant:

Key metrics for IT performance capture speed and stability of software delivery, and include: lead time for changes (from code commit to code deploy), deployment frequency, mean time to restore (MTTR), and change fail rate.

Also in the interview, a concise DevOps definition:

I define DevOps as a technology transformation that drives value to organizations through an ability to deliver code with both speed and stability.

See the rest.

Remember “the attention economy”?

We pay more attention to time spent reading than number of visitors at Medium because, in a world of infinite content — where there are a million shiny attention-grabbing objects a touch away and notifications coming in constantly — it’s meaningful when someone is actually spending time. After all, for a currency to be valuable, it has to be scarce. And while the amount of attention people are willing to give to media and the Internet in general has skyrocketed — largely due to having a screen and connection with them everywhere — it eventually is finite.

That seems like a useful metric.

See also: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attention_economy

Remember “the attention economy”?