Link: Is the internet good or bad for society? Americans are having a tougher time deciding.

“The percentage of people who think the internet is good for society is shrinking. Roughly 70 percent of American adults who use the internet believe it’s mostly good for society, down from 76 percent in 2014, Pew found.”

And:

“About 64 percent of online adults over 65 say the internet has been “a mostly good thing for society,” Pew wrote. In 2014, that number was 78 percent.”
Original source: Is the internet good or bad for society? Americans are having a tougher time deciding.

Pinterest Instapaper

I’ll finally be a heavy Pinterest user:

People use Pinterest and Instapaper for similar reasons. The similarity is almost too close for the deal to make sense. Pinterest started out as a way for people to collect content from around the web for themselves and others to check out later. At first, people were mainly saving images, but they’ve also started saving articles, to the point that Pinterest considers that “a core use case.” But saving articles is the same reason people use Instapaper — its “core use case,” if you will. So why would Pinterest buy a company whose product largely duplicates its own?

Because Instapaper stores the actual content, removing the need for people to leave its app to view it. And because eight-year-old Instapaper brings with it a bunch of insight into the articles that people save and read, which translates into data six-year-old Pinterest can use to get a better idea of what content it should recommend to its audience. That data could be combined with the data Pinterest already has on what content people like to post to and view on its service. And it could give Pinterest a way to try to rival Facebook as a popular place people go to find things to check out, be it wardrobe ideas, tattoo designs, how-to videos or news articles.

Source: How buying Instapaper could help Pinterest become a media portal like Facebook

Good journalism looses money?

Conservatively, counting just the biggest chunks of staff time that went into it, the prison story cost roughly $350,000. The banner ads that appeared on the article brought in $5,000, give or take. Had we been really in your face with ads, we could have doubled or tripled that figure—but it would have been a pain for you, and still only a drop in the bucket for us.

From Mother Jone’s commentary one one of it’s recent mega stories on the prison system.

Yeah: the business model for journalism is not good right now. Put another way: figuring out how to fund reporters lives while they work on The Good Stuff is hard.

The return of story telling with splash of booze

“Tony is an incredibly strong storyteller—he tells stories through food and travel and a little alcohol mixed in,” says Zucker. “Really, that’s what CNN should be about. I learned as much about Israel and the Palestinians from Tony’s hour on Jerusalem as I did from any reporting that I’ve seen.”

I think there’s something magical in that statement. As the Boomers disappear into retirement and the next generation starts running things, I sure as shit hope that framing takes over media and “story telling.” That Cronkite-cum-PC, “everything is clean and tidy and yet culturally balances” has been stifling.

Which is to say: gonzo, hopefully it’s back.

The return of story telling with splash of booze