Link: Employees should work on hard things, not easy things

‘For a business to thrive, each employee must ultimately be worth three times their wages to the business. That means if someone is getting paid $60k per year, their worth to the business likely exceeds $180k. People often underestimate what they are worth. One way people, especially more junior employees, underestimate themselves is by failing to spend most of their time on things that are really hard for them to do. All employees (not just entry level employees) should strive to have at least 70% of their time doing things that are really difficult. These are the tasks that require the most thought, rigor, and attention. And these are the tasks that result in the most growth.’

Of course, this assumes a capitalist view of work. Work is there to generate profit, not help people pass the time (find value in being alive) and making sure they have the means to eat and such.
Original source: Employees should work on hard things, not easy things

Link: How to make innovation programs deliver more than coffee cups

‘“a lack of connection between innovation teams and their parent organization. Teams form/and are taught outside of their parent organization because innovation is disconnected from other activities. This meant that when teams went back to their home organization, they found that execution of existing priorities took precedence. They returned speaking a foreign language (What’s a pivot? Minimum viable what?) to their colleagues and bosses who are rewarded on execution-based metrics. Further, as budgets are planned out years in advance, their organization had no slack for “good ideas.” As a result, there was no way to finish and deploy whatever innovative prototypes the innovators had developed – even ones that have been validated.”’
Original source: How to make innovation programs deliver more than coffee cups

Link: 6 questions with winner of the 2018 MIT Sloan CIO Symposium Leadership Award

“They won’t get comfortable with failure if you make a very big deal about it and keep reminding them that they failed. I normally tell them, ‘You found a way that doesn’t work, let’s go find a way that does.’ They are probably more sensitive to the voice of the leaders, so if the leaders are basically saying, ‘Hey, no big deal, let’s dust ourselves off, and here’s the next cool thing to go try,’ they can move on very quickly and get excited about something new.”
Original source: 6 questions with winner of the 2018 MIT Sloan CIO Symposium Leadership Award

Link: 6 questions with winner of the 2018 MIT Sloan CIO Symposium Leadership Award

“They won’t get comfortable with failure if you make a very big deal about it and keep reminding them that they failed. I normally tell them, ‘You found a way that doesn’t work, let’s go find a way that does.’ They are probably more sensitive to the voice of the leaders, so if the leaders are basically saying, ‘Hey, no big deal, let’s dust ourselves off, and here’s the next cool thing to go try,’ they can move on very quickly and get excited about something new.”
Original source: 6 questions with winner of the 2018 MIT Sloan CIO Symposium Leadership Award

Link: Management Support in Agile Adoption

“In the global survey 82% of respondents reported that getting more support and commitment from all levels of management is a high or medium-term priority. In addition to this research, conversations we have with senior IT professionals all report that as IT has become ingrained in most, if not quite all, business processes it is essential that everyone involved in operating the business needs to be aware of how IT is being used and how it can change daily operations. Without management commitment across the organization, things will get better and change, but not as quickly or as effectively as they could.”

1.) The middle is always frozen. But, thanks because middle management is supposed to, is designed to make sure the process is followed, not dynamically change it all the time.

2.) The business should know how to computer.
Original source: Management Support in Agile Adoption

Link: How to build a business case for DevOps transformation

“Here are a few signs that your company should consider transitioning to DevOps:

Does it take a long time to deliver features?
Are features underutilized?
Do you not know the utilization of features?
Do you have downtime during maintenance or deployment windows?
Do your customers tell you your site is down before you know it?
Do outages occur repeatedly for the same reason?
Are customer feature requests implemented in a way that doesn’t actually fulfill the customer’s needs?”

Original source: How to build a business case for DevOps transformation

Link: Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Win – and Neither Did His Campaign

“During that first month, Walsh’s disbelief and even fear about what was happening in the White House moved her to think about quitting. Every day after that became a countdown toward the moment she knew she wouldn’t be able to take it anymore. To Walsh, the proud political pro, the chaos, the rivalries, and the president’s own lack of focus were simply incomprehensible. In early March, not long before she left, she confronted Kushner with a simple request. “Just give me the three things the president wants to focus on,” she demanded. “What are the three priorities of this White House?”

It was the most basic question imaginable — one that any qualified presidential candidate would have answered long before he took up residence at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Six weeks into Trump’s presidency, Kushner was wholly without an answer.

“Yes,” he said to Walsh. “We should probably have that conversation.””

** Managing is complex, but starts with some pretty simple tasks.
Link to original