Link: OpenStack 2018: Mark Shuttleworth chats to The Reg about 10-year support plans, Linus Torvalds and Russian rockets

While he would obviously be very happy to welcome new customers to the Canonical fold, he points out that IBM is a “smart company” and says that “the guy who led the acquisition is the guy who engineered machines to beat Gary Kasparov. You might hope that there’s a good chess game going on there behind the scenes.”
Original source: OpenStack 2018: Mark Shuttleworth chats to The Reg about 10-year support plans, Linus Torvalds and Russian rockets

Link: SUSE Builds Momentum with Innovative Open Source Offerings, Revenue Growth and Commitment to Enterprise Customers

“For the six months ending April 30, 2018, SUSE saw revenues of $182.9 million, which represents continued growth of approximately 17 percent over the same period in the previous year. Adjusted EBITDA for that period was $56 million, nearly 23 percent year-over-year growth.”
Original source: SUSE Builds Momentum with Innovative Open Source Offerings, Revenue Growth and Commitment to Enterprise Customers

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Link: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

“If you want OpenStack and Kubernetes support with vendor independence at a low price, Canonical is your company. If you prefer a partner, which offers a soup-to-nuts stack, but at a higher price, look to Red Hat. And, of course, if you’re already wedded to VMware, you’ve made your choice. There’s room for all these approaches to the 21st century cloud and containers.”
Original source: ​Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Link: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

“A lot of institutions are figuring out that Ubuntu and upstream Kubernetes gives them 80% of what they need from PaaS, while the open Kubernetes ecosystem takes care of the remaining 20%. And that comes in at a third of the cost of Red Hat,” he said.

Also, he says they’re much cheaper than VMware and RHEL.
Original source: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

Link: Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip. Repeat, an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip

An edge device in every home, office, street corner, etc.

“The way it works is like this: Microsoft makes its system-on-chip (SoC) blueprints available to chip designers, which fabricate the chipset and flog it to IoT device makers. These manufacturers slap the silicon in their products, and run Microsoft’s Linux-based Sphere OS along with their own software on the chip, which connects to Microsoft’s Azure Sphere running on Redmond’s cloud.

Sphere does things like make sure gizmos only run official firmware, and automatically pushes out and installs bug fixes on remote devices, and so on. In the process, the chipmaker moves more silicon, the device vendor gets a turnkey security service to show to customers, and Microsoft gets a cloud customer for the lifespan of the device.”
Original source: Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip. Repeat, an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip

Linux killed Sun?

For the Sun: WTF? files:

Gerstner questioned whether three or four years from now any proprietary version of Unix, such as Sun’s Solaris, will have a leading market position.

One of the more popular theories for the decline of Sun is that they accepted Linux way, way too late. As a counter-example, there’s IBM saying that somewhere around 2006 you’d see the steep decline of the Unix market, including Solaris, of course.

If I ever get around to writing that book on Sun, a chart showing server OS market-share from 2000 to 2016 would pair well with that quote.

If you’ve read Stephen’s fine book, The New Kingmakers, you may recall this relevant passage:

In 2001, IBM publicly committed to spending $1 billion on Linux. To put this in context, that figure represented 1.2% of the company’s revenue that year and a fifth of its entire 2001 R&D spend. Between porting its own applications to Linux and porting Linux to its hardware platforms, IBM, one of the largest commercial technology vendors on the planet, was pouring a billion dollars into the ecosystem around an operating system originally written by a Finnish graduate student that no single entity — not even IBM — could ever own. By the time IBM invested in the technology, Linux was already the product of years of contributions from individual developers and businesses all over the world.

How did this investment pan out? A year later, Bill Zeitler, head of IBM’s server group, claimed that they’d made almost all of that money back. “We’ve recouped most of it in the first year in sales of software and systems. We think it was money well spent. Almost all of it, we got back.”

Source: IBM to spend $1 billion on Linux in 2001 – CNET