Link: Cloud Foundry Project Eirini Inches the Group Closer to Kubernetes

“A lot of work needs to be done for that but it’s evolving quickly,” Childers said of interoperability tests using Eirini as a bridge between Diego and Kubernetes. He did add that the evolution from Diego to Eirini, if it does occur, will be similar to how Cloud Foundry moved from its DEA architecture system to its Diego architecture system. That involved Diego having to show functional parity to DEA and the necessary production readiness for vendors and organizations to feel comfortable using Diego in place of DEA.

Source: Cloud Foundry Project Eirini Inches the Group Closer to Kubernetes

Link: How IBM Watson Overpromised and Underdelivered on AI Health Care

MD Anderson Cancer Center partnered with IBM Watson to create an advisory tool for oncologists. The tool used natural-language processing (NLP) to summarize patients’ electronic health records, then searched databases to provide treatment recommendations. Physicians tried out a prototype in the leukemia department, but MD Anderson canceled the project in 2016—after spending US $62 million on it.

Outside of corporate headquarters, however, IBM has discovered that its powerful technology is no match for the messy reality of today’s health care system. And in trying to apply Watson to cancer treatment, one of medicine’s biggest challenges, IBM encountered a fundamental mismatch between the way machines learn and the way doctors work

Source: How IBM Watson Overpromised and Underdelivered on AI Health Care

FDA wants to regular off-label use of ML-driven devices

Obtaining FDA approval can be a difficult and long process. “The traditional paradigm of medical device regulation was not designed for adaptive AI or ML technologies, which have the potential to adapt and optimize device performance in real – time to continuously improve healthcare for patients,” the report said.

“The highly iterative, autonomous, and adaptive nature of these tools requires a new, total product lifecycle (TPLC) regulatory approach that facilitates a rapid cycle of product improvement and allows these devices to continually improve while providing effective safeguards.”

For example:

If a manufacturer decides that its device that studies retinal scans for diabetic retinopathy can also measure if a patient has high blood pressure or not, it’ll have to contact FDA officials to check if the device can be used for that purpose.

Meanwhile, we can’t even figure out how to figure out the ethics of AI.

This is probably a good space for that Talebian thinking that goes “start with what’s worked for thousands of years, and probably don’t stop.”

Source: Not so fast AI Doctor, the FDA would like to check how good you really are at healthcare

Link: Why Uber’s Business Model May Not Be Viable

The sharing economy, fueled by the internet’s capacity to match small buyers and sellers, looks like a revolutionary business model. But for this model to be sustained, there must be a reliable source of long-term profits. Ride-hailing is perhaps the application of the sharing economy that is currently most developed, so its success or failure will teach us a great deal about the model’s viability in the global business landscape.

At some point, you have to make a profit.

It also ads a cynical angle to “disruption” that’s often omitted: you have to burn a lot of money, maybe even 5 or 10 year’s worth. Older companies often can’t do this without a huge financial and share-holder toll.

Source: Why Uber’s Business Model May Not Be Viable

“Reasons were in short supply.”

And, sure, people always disappear into new people, and no one can stop the way new versions of people overtake the old versions of people, but something about the new Linda was so menacing that it made me suspicious of what she’d done with the old Linda.

This book can hard to read through – it’s got that numb tone of people staring at their nihilistic existence. At least that’s my read. But, it’s full of the clarity that comes with that bleakness.

Source: Certain American States: Stories

Link: SUSE on Cloud 9 for love-in with OpenStack and Kubernetes

> With the Cloud Application Platform 1.4, SUSE has set its sights on a multi-cloud world laying claim to being the first software distribution to go 100 per cent Kubernetes for Cloud Foundry.
>
> …
>
> The juice comes from Cloud Foundry’s Project Eirini, which allows devs to seamlessly switch between Kubernetes or Cloud Foundry Diego as their container scheduler. An organisation already invested in the Kubernetes world therefore does not have to faff around with the Cloud Foundry Application Runtime orchestration. A single scheduler should do the trick.

Source: SUSE on Cloud 9 for love-in with OpenStack and Kubernetes

Link: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.5, Now GA, Harnesses the Power of Istio and Envoy to Make Your Developers More Productive

Whole lotta features:

> – Weighted routing uses Istio and Envoy to simplify blue-green deployments (beta)
> – Platform Automation for PCF, the engine of your perpetual upgrade machine (beta)
> – Windows Server 2019, Microsoft’s most container-friendly OS yet, now powers PAS for Windows (coming soon)
> – Consume upstream Kubernetes your way with the new PKS family
> – Got apps that need multiple custom ports? Run ‘em on PAS.
> – Use metadata on API resources throughout PAS to share context
> – Keep tabs on all your apps, wherever they run with multi-foundation Apps Manager (coming soon)
> – Steeltoe 2.2 improves the stability of your microservices, simplifies connections to MongoDB
> – Spring Cloud Data Flow for PCF 1.4: Wire up data pipelines across Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry (coming soon)
> – Single Sign-On for PCF 1.9 will help you get more done faster with a new, streamlined dashboard (coming soon)
> – Detecting manifest changes with Ops Manager is much easier
> – Other Enhancements
> – Public Service Announcements
> – Try Pivotal Cloud Foundry for Free

Source: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.5, Now GA, Harnesses the Power of Istio and Envoy to Make Your Developers More Productive

Link: Why Urban Millennials Love Uniqlo

The question Uniqlo faces now is whether it can inherit the Gap’s empire without repeating its mistakes. To do so, it will have to convince shoppers across the country of a proposition that’s radical for the industry: Fashion can be affordable without being disposable.

And:

Despite the underwhelming performance of Uniqlo’s American stores thus far, the company’s operating income outside of Japan grew by more than 62 percent year-over-year in 2018, while revenue grew slightly more than 25 percent. From its urban outposts, Uniqlo can slowly upend American ideas about the interplay between quality, style, and status—one basic button-down at a time.

Source: Why Urban Millennials Love Uniqlo

Link: Why Did WOW Air Fail?

For one, there’s tons of competition on transatlantic routes. Not only from ultra low cost carriers, but the reality is that nowadays even legacy airlines have incredibly low transatlantic fares, because they know they have to compete. $400-500 roundtrip fares on major carriers are the norm in the off season.

When fares are that low, it really makes you wonder what the point is of flying an airline like WOW Air. Even if they charged $200 roundtrip (which is way lower than their usual fares), you’d end up paying more by the time you paid for baggage, food, drinks, seat assignments, etc.

How are other airlines able to charge these fares? Because the major airlines aren’t making money off economy transatlantic fares in the off season. Think of those cheap fares as paying a bit of gas money, but the reality is that airlines make their money off the handful of people on each flight who are spending $10,000 for a full fare business class ticket. That’s where the money is, and the rest is only working towards breaking even. Ultra low cost carriers don’t have those lucrative passengers.

Source: Why Did WOW Air Fail?

Link: Adobe Summit 2019 analysis – CX hype is countered by Chegg’s digital turnaround story

Chegg isn’t digital-only today. They still ship five million textbooks a year – but their mission has changed. And, as Narayan pointed out, they now need new metrics. Rosensweig said those metrics include subscriber growth, revenue growth, engagement, renewal, and conversion rates. But there’s an underlying metric: create something awesome.

What we learned was you not only have to get them to subscribe, you [also have to] lower your cost to customer acquisition, which at one point for us was 27 dollars. Now it’s $3.50. Our renewal rates were 63 percent; they’re now in the mid-80s for a monthly renewal.

Source: Adobe Summit 2019 analysis – CX hype is countered by Chegg’s digital turnaround story

Link: Naspers plans to spin off its Tencent stake and other holdings

Naspers, which started out as an Afrikaans newspaper group a century ago, has since gone on to invest in a host of startups, mostly in emerging markets. The runaway success of Tencent has created an enviable headache: Naspers has become too big for the Johannesburg stock exchange, where it now makes up a quarter of the local index. Such scale requires foreign investors, not all of whom are keen on South Africa’s currency and political risk. Amsterdam, where Naspers already has staff, has similar listing requirements to Johannesburg.

Source: Naspers plans to spin off its Tencent stake and other holdings

Link: The skills leaders need

people tend to assume that confident individuals are competent, when there is no actual relationship between the two qualities. Those confident people are then promoted. Overconfidence afflicts both sexes, but men more so; one study found that they overestimated their abilities by 30% and women by 15% on average.

Source: The skills leaders need

Hotel robots bad, coffee robots good

Jeff Bezos walking with robot dog

But when the robots were put in place, things went wrong. The concierge struggled to answer guests’ questions. The dancers in the lobby broke down. The luggage-carriers could not climb stairs or go outside. A question-and-answer robot could not handle anything beyond basic inquiries—and responded to at least one guest’s snoring by waking him repeatedly to tell him it could not understand what he was saying. Rather than saving labour, the robots actually required the hotel to increase staffing in order to assist and repair the struggling robots. So the hotel recently decided to lay off more than half of its 243 robots.

Hotel robots bad. But, from the same “newspaper,” as they say, turns out robots are good for coffee and burger production:

Gavin pathross likes his Americano at a particular strength, with exactly 2.8 shots of espresso, an order that human baristas struggle to get right. But the baristas at Ratio, his new coffee shop in Shanghai, are anything but human. Customers specify, order and pay for their coffee via their smartphones. A robot arm then grinds the beans, pumps shots of espresso and carries out the rest of the work. The robot can supply water and coffee in any ratio desired—hence the shop’s name. Once it has prepared the beverage, it passes the finished product to a human waiter for serving.

Link: Standard Bank contracts with AWS for mass migration to the cloud

The bank has selected AWS as its preferred cloud provider with the intention of porting its production workloads, including its customer facing platforms and strategic core banking applications to the cloud.

From what I can tell talking with banks, they’re over that 2010 thing of “public cloud isn’t secure enough.” Now it’s a scramble to move their shit up there.

Source: Standard Bank contracts with AWS for mass migration to the cloud

Link: Digital, Strategy and Design

Strategy involves determining the company’s intent. Strategy is expressed in an understanding of the environment, an expression of ambition, decisions regarding the allocation of resources and plan of execution. Strategy provides a perspective on where and how the company will win from the inside out.
Design entails understanding and expressing customer intent. Expressed in terms of persona’s, needs, journey maps, touchpoints and prototypes. Design provides a perspective on how and why customers win from the outside in.

Source: Digital, Strategy and Design

Link: The platform play: How to operate like a tech company

One of the global leading banks created about 30 platforms. One such platform was payments, which consisted of more than 60 applications that previously had been managed independently from each other. The top team decided to bring the 300-plus IT people working on development and maintenance of payments together with the corresponding people on the business side. Under joint business/IT leadership, this entity was empowered to move quickly on priority business initiatives, to modernize the IT structure, and to allocate the resources to make that happen.

The team shifted its working model and started running the payments platform as an internal business that served all the different parts of the bank (think payments as a service). This approach made it clear where to focus specific tech interventions: removal of nonstrategic IT applications; modernization and accelerated shift of the target applications into the cloud; connectivity to enable swapping solutions in or out easily; and, most important, a major step-up in feature/solution development for the internal business clients. This platform-based way of running the business was then progressively rolled out across the group. Prioritization is set by the top team (because empowerment does not mean anarchy), and all IT interventions are run the same way, to ensure consistency and replicability.

Their notion of a platform is more like the old API economy thing:

A platform-based company will have 20 to 40 platforms, each big enough to provide an important and discrete service but small enough to be manageable. To simplify platform management, it helps to group them into three broad areas: customer journeys, business capabilities, and core IT capabilities (Exhibit 1).

For example, in personal banking, the customer-journey platforms cover the customer experiences of searching, opening an account, getting a mortgage, and so on. The business-capability platforms deliver the banking solutions, such as payments and credit analytics, and the support capabilities, such as employee-pension management, visual dashboarding, and management information systems (MIS). Finally, the core IT platforms provide the shared technology on which the journeys and business capabilities run, such as the cloud platform, the data analytics environment, and the set of IT connectivity solutions.

Source: The platform play: How to operate like a tech company

Link: Google makes emails more dynamic with AMP for Email

With AMP for Email, those messages become interactive. That means you’ll be able to RSVP to an event right from the message, fill out a questionnaire, browse through a store’s inventory or respond to a comment — all without leaving your web-based email client.

Some of the companies that already support this new format are Booking.com, Despegar, Doodle, Ecwid, Freshworks, Nexxt, OYO Rooms, Pinterest and redBus. If you regularly get emails from these companies, then chances are you’ll receive an interactive email from them in the coming weeks.

Source: Google makes emails more dynamic with AMP for Email