Link: Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives

What it all comes down to is that a mindset is an interpretative process that tells us what is going on around us. In the fixed mindset, that process is scored by an internal monologue of constant judging and evaluation, using every piece of information as evidence either for or against such assessments as whether you’re a good person, whether your partner is selfish, or whether you are better than the person next to you. In a growth mindset, on the other hand, the internal monologue is not one of judgment but one of voracious appetite for learning, constantly seeking out the kind of input that you can metabolize into learning and constructive action.
Original source: Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives

Link: How to have a good conversation

What is conversation for anyway?  I don’t even recommend being charming, or trying to be charming, unless a work situation is forcing you to do so.  Let yourself be sullen when the mood beckons.  Feel free to let eye contact lapse.  Don’t repeat back what you’ve heard.  Say something surprising.  Be willing to go meta.  Most of all, try to establish a “we actually can have a more genuine conversation than we thought was going to be possible” level of understanding, taking whatever chances are needed to get to that higher level of discourse.
Original source: How to have a good conversation

Link: 6 questions with winner of the 2018 MIT Sloan CIO Symposium Leadership Award

“They won’t get comfortable with failure if you make a very big deal about it and keep reminding them that they failed. I normally tell them, ‘You found a way that doesn’t work, let’s go find a way that does.’ They are probably more sensitive to the voice of the leaders, so if the leaders are basically saying, ‘Hey, no big deal, let’s dust ourselves off, and here’s the next cool thing to go try,’ they can move on very quickly and get excited about something new.”
Original source: 6 questions with winner of the 2018 MIT Sloan CIO Symposium Leadership Award

Link: 6 questions with winner of the 2018 MIT Sloan CIO Symposium Leadership Award

“They won’t get comfortable with failure if you make a very big deal about it and keep reminding them that they failed. I normally tell them, ‘You found a way that doesn’t work, let’s go find a way that does.’ They are probably more sensitive to the voice of the leaders, so if the leaders are basically saying, ‘Hey, no big deal, let’s dust ourselves off, and here’s the next cool thing to go try,’ they can move on very quickly and get excited about something new.”
Original source: 6 questions with winner of the 2018 MIT Sloan CIO Symposium Leadership Award