Link: How to make innovation programs deliver more than coffee cups

‘“a lack of connection between innovation teams and their parent organization. Teams form/and are taught outside of their parent organization because innovation is disconnected from other activities. This meant that when teams went back to their home organization, they found that execution of existing priorities took precedence. They returned speaking a foreign language (What’s a pivot? Minimum viable what?) to their colleagues and bosses who are rewarded on execution-based metrics. Further, as budgets are planned out years in advance, their organization had no slack for “good ideas.” As a result, there was no way to finish and deploy whatever innovative prototypes the innovators had developed – even ones that have been validated.”’
Original source: How to make innovation programs deliver more than coffee cups

Link: How value stream analysis unclogs DevOps workflows

“It’s not about productivity; it’s about value-tivity. Productivity represents the capacity to increase output for a given level of input. But this output can also be rubbish, which adds no value to the business.”

Link to original

Why Big Companies Need Lean Startup Techniques, Gartner

A lead-gen-y blog post, but with some good stuff, e.g.:

  • “Gartner estimates by 2021, more than 50% of established corporations will be leveraging lean startup techniques at the business level to increase the pace and success of business transformation.”
  • Nice MVP/small batch framing: “A critical challenge for many organizations will be adopting radical MVP thinking in the business (not just in IT). Businesses must define what is the least investment needed (in time, budget, resources, etc.) to test the most uncertain assumptions for the new product or service.”
  • And a mini-case study of the Queensland state government which ain’t half bad.

Source: Why Big Companies Need Lean Startup Techniques – Smarter With Gartner

Silos are often defined and enforced by workstream (in)visibility

The primary measure of progress for the Scrum Team is working software, but the primary measure of progress for the Product Owner is user stories that are “ready,” which is a very nebulous concept.

a Kanban board can make a cross-functional team feel more like a reality. In a large organization, where there are specialist systems, software, hardware, and test engineers, the various disciplines are usually not going to start performing work in each other disciplines, no matter whether or not they are on the same agile team. But by working off the same board, at least they are in the position of being able to visualize each other’s work and see how what they are doing contributes to the success of the whole program.

the advantage of lean and Kanban approaches is that they make explicit and visible the full state of a program in a way that encourages people to make good decisions for improvement to the process as a whole rather than optimizing for one part of the process. This includes the poor product owner, whose work is finished before most agile boards start.

From: “The Case for Lean: Capturing Business Work”