Link: Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

“Consider this: how well can you discern different shades of blue? If you speak Russian, Greek, Turkish, Korean or Japanese, your chances are much better than if you speak English. The former groups have two distinctive linguistic representations of blue. In Russian, for example, dark blue (sinii) and light blue (goluboi) are as distinct as red and pink. But in English, we know blue as a single concept. The deprivation of finer-grained color concepts poses a great perceptual disadvantage. English speakers more easily confuse blue shades, not because we have poorer vision, but because we lack the more granular distinctions in the language we speak.”
Original source: Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

Link: Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

“Consider this: how well can you discern different shades of blue? If you speak Russian, Greek, Turkish, Korean or Japanese, your chances are much better than if you speak English. The former groups have two distinctive linguistic representations of blue. In Russian, for example, dark blue (sinii) and light blue (goluboi) are as distinct as red and pink. But in English, we know blue as a single concept. The deprivation of finer-grained color concepts poses a great perceptual disadvantage. English speakers more easily confuse blue shades, not because we have poorer vision, but because we lack the more granular distinctions in the language we speak.”
Original source: Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition

What I mean when I say “fine”

I’ve found myself saying “and that’s fine a lot recently. I have a weird lexicon of words and their corresponding hacked semantics that I often use in more of a way to entertain myself than to inform other people. Having this weird lexicon keeps me entertained and also lets me filter in and out people who know me well or don’t. It’s like people who call me “Mike.” They have no idea who I am.

I’ve had to retire words from time to time. I used to say “exciting!” all the time to pretty much mean “that sounds less than insane; good for you; this is boring; let’s move on to the next topic.” (See what I mean about it being “weird”? Apparently I speak in semi-colons too.)

People at Dell figured this out after two or three hundred meetings with me, and would start using it in that same mocking way. I try to say “exciting!” less now. James was always super-astute at unmasking the real semantics. He’s one of the few people I’ve met who enjoys words qua words as much as I do.

Back to “fine.” As I explained to someone this morning, I have four levels of “goodness”:

  1. Burn the place down – doing so poorly that we should just shut it down. Awful.
  2. Doing poorly – not doing so hot, things need to be fixed.
  3. Fine – all things considered, given the choice, I’d rather be doing this then shooting myself in the nuts.
  4. Great – hey, I actually kind of like this.

Occasionally, other level of excellence are achieved, but they’re off the scale and usually involve booze and friends, not 9 to 5 existence.