Link: Press 1 for automagic K8s cluster. Press 2 or 3 for complex Kubernetes

“many developers want to adopt Kubernetes, but have little interest in provisioning the infrastructure, little skill at doing so optimally and no appetite to hire people to do either chore.”

Yeah. In other words: infrastructure software, a concise history.
Original source: Press 1 for automagic K8s cluster. Press 2 or 3 for complex Kubernetes

Link: Embracing Kubernetes Doesn’t Have to Mean OPERATING Kubernetes – Container Solutions

“You can now embrace Kubernetes without managing all the pain yourself. AKS going GA yesterday was the trigger: now, all three major cloud providers offer production-ready managed Kubernetes services. Businesses may now run Kubernetes on the cloud of their choice, without needing to install, operate, and maintain their own Kubernetes management infrastructure.”
Original source: Embracing Kubernetes Doesn’t Have to Mean OPERATING Kubernetes – Container Solutions

Link: IBM Drops Cloud Management Platform Onto Kubernetes

“The CMS platform is used by organizations to manage enterprise applications. Those applications include offerings from SAP and Oracle. CMS includes security, disaster recovery, automated infrastructure, and application management…. IBM launched its Cloud Private service last November. It’s built on a Kubernetes-based container architecture that supports integration and portability of workloads between the cloud environment and management across multiple clouds. This includes IBM Cloud, IBM PowerVC, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and VMware on and off premises.”

Original source: IBM Drops Cloud Management Platform Onto Kubernetes

Link: Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) Is Now Generally Available – More Regions and New Features

“The GA release of AKS includes a set of new features available in all regions like the Kubernetes role-based access control (RBAC), Azure Active Directory-based identity, and the ability to deploy clusters into pre-existing custom virtual networks.”
Original source: Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) Is Now Generally Available – More Regions and New Features

Link: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

“In practice and actual fact, what really matters for older Kubernetes version support is the continued availability and exercising of its end-to-end testing pipeline. If the machinery to quickly update an old release continues to exist, and exist in a state of good (non-flakey) repair, cutting a patch release is just a matter of someone – you, your provider or your vendor – having the engineering gumption to push it through. If a critical security fix isn’t back-ported to an older Kubernetes version, that’s a strong sign that no reasonably professional team is using that version in production anymore.”
Original source: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

Link: CNCF Brings the Helm Package Manager for Kubernetes into the Fold

“The software allows users to share applications as Kubernetes charts. The applications themselves, under Helm, can be consistently set up across different Kubernetes deployments. The software also provides a way to manage individual Kubernetes manifests, or configuration files… Helm joins a growing number of CNCF projects, all designed to ease the process of running workloads on cloud services in a vendor-neutral way. Other projects include Prometheus, OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Envoy, Jaeger, Notary, TUF, Vitess, and NATS.”
Original source: CNCF Brings the Helm Package Manager for Kubernetes into the Fold

Link: The State Of The Kubernetes Ecosystem

Overview of the (vendor) players.

Also:

  • “According to predictions from 451 Research, the market is set to grow from $762 million in 2016 to $2.7 billion by 2020.”

  • “A Forrester study found that 66% of organizations who adopted containers experienced accelerated developers efficiency, while 75% of companies achieved a moderate to significant increase in application deployment speed.”
    Original source: The State Of The Kubernetes Ecosystem

Link: The State Of The Kubernetes Ecosystem

Overview of the (vendor) players.

Also:

  • “According to predictions from 451 Research, the market is set to grow from $762 million in 2016 to $2.7 billion by 2020.”

  • “A Forrester study found that 66% of organizations who adopted containers experienced accelerated developers efficiency, while 75% of companies achieved a moderate to significant increase in application deployment speed.”
    Original source: The State Of The Kubernetes Ecosystem

Link: The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point | InfoWorld

“Enterprises want stuff that works. As much as we in the open source world chatter and fret about vendor lockin, enterprises have demonstrated a remarkable ability to shrug off that concern and buy deeply into Microsoft, Oracle, and, yes, Red Hat’s OpenShift.”
Original source: The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point | InfoWorld

Link: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

“A lot of institutions are figuring out that Ubuntu and upstream Kubernetes gives them 80% of what they need from PaaS, while the open Kubernetes ecosystem takes care of the remaining 20%. And that comes in at a third of the cost of Red Hat,” he said.

Also, he says they’re much cheaper than VMware and RHEL.
Original source: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

Link: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

‘Importantly, the OpenShift platform cloud software, which included Red Hat’s own implementation of the Kubernetes container controller, will be deployable on either the full-on Red Hat Enterprise Linux in pets mode or the minimalist Red Hat CoreOS in cattle mode. But it will be using the Tectonic version of the Kubernetes controller going forward as well as integrating the Prometheus monitoring tool and etcd for storing telemetry. Gracely tells The Next Platform that the implementation of Kubernetes had outside dependencies such as the CloudForms hybrid cloud management tool (formerly ManageIQ) and was not “native” to Kubernetes in the same way that Tectonic is, meaning free of outside dependenies.’
Original source: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

Link: The Top Challenges Kubernetes Users Face with Deployment

“The results show that complexity — a common criticism of Kubernetes — is only the fifth most cited challenge. In the lead are infrastructure-related challenges. Security was cited by 46 percent of Kubernetes users, with networking and storage coming in second and third place.”
Original source: The Top Challenges Kubernetes Users Face with Deployment

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?