IBM’s new Private Cloud Stack, it’s got the Kubernetes & Containers

This week, Big Blue rolled out its new IBM Cloud Private software platform that is designed to enable enterprises to develop on-premises private cloud environments to accelerate app development and allow for easier movement of workloads between their private clouds and public clouds – not only the IBM Cloud but also those from other vendors. Similarly, IBM is leaning on open and container-based technologies for enhanced integration and portability of workloads. The IBM Cloud Private platform is built on Kubernetes, an open-source technology for container orchestration, and will support both Docker containers and Cloud Foundry framework.

More:

IBM Cloud Private can run on a variety of infrastructures, including the vendor’s own mainframe and Power systems, its hyperconverged infrastructure that runs Nutanix software, and IBM Storage’s Spectrum Access solution. In addition, it can run on systems from Dell EMC, Lenovo, Cisco Systems and NetApp, and can be deployed by such VMware, Canonical and other OpenStack distributions as well as bare-metal systems. The private cloud platform also includes such developer services for data analytics as Db2, Db2 Warehouse, PostgreSQL and MongoDB, developer tools like Netcool, UrbanCode, and Cloud Brokerage and open-source management software such as Jenkins, Prometheus, Grafana, and ElasticSearch.

Source: IBM Builds Private Cloud Stack With Kubernetes And Containers

Better details on the Cisco/Google partnership around kubernetes and Istio

The cloud initiative combines Google’s de facto standard Kubernetes cluster orchestration platform for managing applications and services across hybrid infrastructure with Cisco’s networking and security expertise. It also leverages Cisco’s push into hyper-converged infrastructure. Along with extending security to application containers and other micro-services, the deal would allow users to monitor application behavior running on hybrid platforms, the partners said.

The other pillar of the collaboration is Istio, another open source tool released earlier this year to help manage micro-services via what developers call a “service mesh network.” Working with Kubernetes, Istio aims to provide a uniform means of connecting and managing micro-services.

And, more here:

The companies will offer the joint solution to a limited number of customers during the first part of 2018 with generally availability coming later in the year.

Source: Cisco, Google Join Forces on Hybrid Cloud

Docker and kubernetes

Dave Bartoletti, an analyst with IT consultancy Forrester, said it’s clear that Kubernetes has won at the orchestration layer. “There’s too much mindshare around it,” he said in a phone interview with The Register. “There are too many developers who just want this.”

Pretty much everyone has the sentiment that kubernetes has won.

More details from Joseph Tsidulko at CRN:

While some components of Enterprise Edition previously could be made to work with Kubernetes, the crucial control plane for managing the lifecycle of containerized applications was incompatible. Docker, however, had participated in the Kubernetes project, and always believed the technologies were complementary, Chanana said.
Docker is now focused on building out the components needed to make Kubernetes an enterprise-grade solution, just as it did with Swarm, he said, including security, high availability, and ease of use through its existing tools and control plane. Those are capabilities Docker uniquely can deliver to ease a lot of the struggles customers face in taking advantage of Kubernetes’ advanced container-scheduling capabilities.

Source: Kubernetes has won. Docker Enterprise Edition to support rival container-wrangling tech

Stateless apps in one, stateful apps in the other

It happens to be the case that CF — because it’s an app platform and wants to let the user focus on their code — provides a way to convert code in to containers inside the platform without having to start messing around with Dockerfiles and the like. And this functionality even does some cool things for you like keeping your container OS automatically patched so you don’t have to build CI pipelines to monitor your base images and rebuild stuff.

That’s why I love Cloud Foundry’s Application Runtime. Of course, because of these constraints — the constraints that are why I love it — the App Runtime can’t possibly work for complex stateful services: the whole point is for it not to. And that’s why it’s fantastic that there’s now a Container Runtime (which I wish we’d called a Stateful Services Runtime because that’s how I think of it).

Source: CF vs Kube: Is the difference who creates the container?

2017 Cloud Foundry Application Runtime Survey – Highlights

There’s a new survey out from the Cloud Foundry Foundation, looking at the users of Cloud Foundry. Here’s some highlights and notes:

  • Another ClearPath joint, n=735.
  • It’s important to keep in mind that this is covers all distress of Cloud Foundry, including open source (no vendor involved).
  • “The percentage of user respondents who require over three months
    per app drops from 51 percent to 18 percent after deploying Cloud Foundry Application Runtime”
  • “…while the percentage of user respondents who require less than a week climbs from 16 percent to 46 percent.”
  • “Nearly half (49 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are large enterprises ($1+ billion annual revenue).”
  • This chart is hard to read, but it shows a reduction in time to deploy across various time periods:
    before-after-release.
  • Uptake is early, but there are definitely mature users: “A plurality of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users (61 percent) describe their deployments as somewhere in the early stages—trial, PoC, evaluation, or a partial integration into specific business units. Meanwhile, 39 percent have deployed Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly across their company, from total integration in specific business groups to company-wide deployment.”
  • “Comcast, for example has more than 1500 developers using Cloud Foundry Application Runtime daily. Home Depot reports more than 2500 developers.”
  • “Comcast has seen between 50 percent and 75 percent improvement in productivity.”
  • “Half of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are currently using containers, such as Docker or rkt, with another 35 percent evaluating or deploying containers.”
  • Container management – there’s a wide variety of tools that people use for container orchestration, including DIY (14%). There’s a lot of interest in having CF do it: “Nearly three-quarters (71 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users currently using or evaluating containers are interested in adding container orchestration and management to their Cloud Foundry Application Runtime environment.” Hence, validating the Cloud Foundry Container Runtime.
  • Of course, the surveyed are already CF users, so they’re biased/driven by what they know.
  • Almost half of respondents say that getting started with CF. But people end up liking it: “An overwhelming majority of users (83 percent) would recommend Cloud Foundry Application Runtime to a colleague, including 60 percent who would do so strongly.”
  • “As more companies roll out Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly, the footprint continues to grow. Currently, 46 percent of users have more than 10 apps deployed on Cloud Foundry Application Runtime, including 18 percent with over 100 (and eight percent with over 500).” 4% have over 1,000 apps.
  • CF’s uses: “The primary use is for microservices (54 percent), followed by websites (38 percent), internal business applications (31 percent), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) (27 percent) and legacy software (eight percent).”
  • Validating multi-cloud: “60 percent say this is very important, and another 30 percent describe it as somewhat important.” Meanwhile, 53% are using more than one type of IaaS.

Bloomberg on kubernetes in Cloud Foundry

On overview of how Bloomberg is looking at the likes of Pivotal Container Services:

“Many Kubernetes distributions are good on day one, when they’re first deployed,” said Andrey Rybka, technical architect in the office of the CTO at Bloomberg, the global finance, media and tech company based in New York. “But what happens on day two, when something fails? Kubernetes doesn’t [automatically] address things like failures at the physical node level.”

And:

The roadmap for Cloud Foundry Container Runtime includes support for stateful applications based on the StatefulSets feature that became available with Kubernetes 1.7 in June. The foundation also plans to integrate the Istio project, founded by IBM, Google and Lyft in May, which helps to manage network communications between microservices

Also, see coverage of the general announcement in TechCrunch, the related press release, and our discussion in this week’s podcast.

Source: Cloud Foundry Container Runtime eases Kubernetes ops

Puppet’s new pipeline & kubernetes tools

The three new Puppet products based on Distelli’s technology are Puppet Pipelines for Apps, which automates key application development and delivery tasks; Puppet Pipelines for Containers, which enables users to build Docker images from a repository and deploy them to Kubernetes clusters; and Puppet Container Registry, which gives developers a comprehensive view of their Docker images across all repositories.

Source: Puppet Launches Barrage Of Products To Enable ‘New Age’ Of Software Automation And DevOps

Red Hat OpenShift Momentum – Highlights

Brian Gracely of Red Hat (and formally an analyst who did some of the best “cloud-native”/cloud platform work early on) has a momentum post on Open Shift. Here’s my highlights:

Sizing up revenue and deal-size:
[Q3, FY 2017] Also of note, we closed our second OpenShift deal over $10 million and another OpenShift deal over $5 million. And significantly, we actually had over 50 OpenShift deals alone that were six or seven figures, so really strong traction. [Q4, FY 2017] with our largest deals in Q4 approximately one-third had an OpenShift container platform component.
Red Hat hasn’t yet been too clear on OpenShift revenue, so you have to tea-leave out these revenue spreads, which I haven’t really done. Earlier in April, Jeffrey Burt at The Next Platform had this to say:
During the final three months of last year, subscription revenue for Red Hat’s application development-related [JBoss, etc] and other emerging technologies – which includes OpenShift – hit $125 million, a 40 percent increase from the same period in 2015, and revenue for the group accounted for about 20 percent of Red Hat’s overall revenues for the fourth quarter.
Today, we also announced that Barclays Bank, the Government of British Columbias Office of the CIO, and Macquarie Bank are also using Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform to modernize application development…. airplane manufacturer Airbus about their DevOps journey, and digital travel platform Amadeus about their transformation of handling 2,000x the number of online transactions…. how Amsterdams Schipol Airport (AMS) is using OpenShift to redefine the in-terminal travel experience, how Miles & More GmbH is better managing rewards programs for travelers, and how ATPCO is rethinking how they publish fare-related data to the airline and travel industry.
Much of the write-up focuses on community momentum, true to Red Hat, open source form:

The OpenShift Commons community has 260+ member organizations….

Red Hat engineers lead or co-lead in 10 of the 24 Kubernetes SIG activities.
Finally, some commentary on their strategic shift to Kubernetes:
The huge architectural shift that we made a few years ago in adopting open standards for containers and the Kubernetes container scheduler has allowed us to delivered a unified platform to containerize existing applications and deliver agility and scalability for cloud-native applications and microservices. We call this combination Enterprise Kubernetes+, or Enterprise-Ready Kubernetes.
Red Hat’s OpenShift is, of course, a competitor to us over at Pivotal.

Microsoft buys Deis, deeper into Kubernetes & $1.1bn container market – Notebook

A round-up of the news and some context around Microsoft burrowing down further into Kubernetes-land by acquiring Deis:

The deal & market

  • Microsoft: “Deis gives developers the means to vastly improve application agility, efficiency and reliability through their Kubernetes container management technologies…. We expect Deis’ technology to make it even easier for customers to work with our existing container portfolio including Linux and Windows Server Containers, Hyper-V Containers and Azure Container Service, no matter what tools they choose to use.”
  • Deis: “We look forward to making Azure the best place to run containerized workloads.”
  • Deis is/was part of EngineYard, right? – Notable that EngineYard (on April 10th, 2017, day of announcement) doesn’t mention it on their blog, or press release list. And that Deis and Microsoft don’t really either. See 451’s Jay Lyman’s coverage of that deal in 2015.
  • No deal-size was disclosed, of course, but Deis was small and I’m guessing it didn’t fit into EngineYard’s overall strategy, or what (little?) cash they got was a nice to have versus synergies of keeping Deis.
  • Containers are rising in usage, as 451’s Donnie said: “Our latest data says production use of containers has doubled from 10.2% to 22.5% of orgs between Q1 and Q3 2015. Amazing.”
  • 451’s January 2016 container market TAMs and forecast:
Screenshot 2017-04-10 13.56.56

The technology: not so much PaaS anymore, but Kubernetes management

Deis stack

Microsoft likes Kubernetes

  • Seems like Microsoft has gone all k8-crazy. So this is adding k8 support and some cloud-native services/middleware (package mgmt, routing, etc.) to Azure?
  • Back in July of 2016, Microsoft hired a k8 big-wheel (and other, “small wheels,” I’d assume), so they’re obviously into the thing…or at least the thinking behind the think. This leave, once again, Amazon as the last major cloud hold-out on k8.
  • That said, I think Microsoft’s new thing is to like everything that layers on-top, below, or around them. As long as you’re in every deal, you make a lot of money even if you’re not all of every deal. It’s pretty hard, now, of course, to compete with the big clouds.
  • Or, put another way: “Satya is like the Pope Francis of software,” says Alex Polvi, founder and CEO of CoreOS, a company that plays in the same area as Deis. “He took this old institution and made it cool again.”

Misc.