Link: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

“A lot of institutions are figuring out that Ubuntu and upstream Kubernetes gives them 80% of what they need from PaaS, while the open Kubernetes ecosystem takes care of the remaining 20%. And that comes in at a third of the cost of Red Hat,” he said.

Also, he says they’re much cheaper than VMware and RHEL.
Original source: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

Link: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

‘Importantly, the OpenShift platform cloud software, which included Red Hat’s own implementation of the Kubernetes container controller, will be deployable on either the full-on Red Hat Enterprise Linux in pets mode or the minimalist Red Hat CoreOS in cattle mode. But it will be using the Tectonic version of the Kubernetes controller going forward as well as integrating the Prometheus monitoring tool and etcd for storing telemetry. Gracely tells The Next Platform that the implementation of Kubernetes had outside dependencies such as the CloudForms hybrid cloud management tool (formerly ManageIQ) and was not “native” to Kubernetes in the same way that Tectonic is, meaning free of outside dependenies.’
Original source: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

Link: IBM’s cloud strategy revolves around multi-cloud support, grabbing new workloads

‘Among the moving parts from IBM:

-The IBM Cloud Private platform will get cloud-migration tools with an “application transformation advisor” that scans applications and provides guidance on moving them to the cloud. Cloud Automation Manager will help deploy these applications on-premises or in a cloud of choice.

-Kubernetes container support is expanded. IBM Cloud Private will offer new container versions of IBM app development and management software. These container versions will cover API

-Connect, UrbanCode and Netcool. IBM also added new support for Windows containers running .Net apps.

-A cloud integration platform that includes messaging, API management, app integration, secure gateway and high-speed trial software.

Link: Using VMware’s Harbor with PKS (and Why Kubernetes Needs a Container Registry)

“A container registry is the repository for all your container images. Since your core business applications are packaged into containers (built out of container images), you must protect these images just as you would any other important enterprise IT system. That’s where the image registry comes into play.”
Original source: Using VMware’s Harbor with PKS (and Why Kubernetes Needs a Container Registry)

Link: Aqua Extends Container Security Platform to Kubernetes, Cloud Services

“With Aqua 3.0, users can create fine-grained user access control roles and policies. Access to kubectl commands can be specified to particular users, and governed by Aqua’s scalable labeling format. The Kubernetes controls also provides the ability to block unapproved images from running across entire cluster, as well as the ability to control network traffic based on Kubernetes namespaces, clusters or deployments.”

Plus, some policy drift report making. Done with a sidecar.
Original source: Aqua Extends Container Security Platform to Kubernetes, Cloud Services