Link: Amy Chozick’s book is about Hillary Clinton — and all the things reporters don’t write in their stories about Hillary Clinton

“I think her career is going to be such a symbol of how we viewed powerful women in this period of American history, that it’s going to be incredibly important and studied for decades,” she said. “The fact the last chapter of her political career was up against this candidate who was bragging about sexually assaulting women, and had a known history of insulting women, it was such a confluence of forces.”
Original source: Amy Chozick’s book is about Hillary Clinton — and all the things reporters don’t write in their stories about Hillary Clinton

Link: Info Commissioner tears into Google’s ‘call us journalists’ trial defence

‘This argument enraged the ICO, which said in the submission: “The concept of ‘journalism’ presupposes a process by which content is published to an audience pursuant to the taking of human editorial decisions as to the substantive nature and extent of that content.”… In plain English, humans (mostly) don’t decide what appears in search results so calling Google’s activities “journalism” is just plain wrong, according to the commissioner.’
Original source: Info Commissioner tears into Google’s ‘call us journalists’ trial defence

Link: The Ivory Tower Can’t Keep Ignoring Tech

“[W]e shouldn’t have to depend on journalism to do the tedious, serious work of understanding the problems with algorithms any more than we depend on it to pursue the latest questions in sociology or environmental science.”

More: “There is essentially no distinct field of academic study that takes seriously the responsibility of understanding and critiquing the role of technology — and specifically, the algorithms that are responsible for so many decisions — in our lives.”
Original source: The Ivory Tower Can’t Keep Ignoring Tech

Link: The cost of reporting while female

‘Priddy’s particular safety is also a matter of local specificity: Most residents think she’s on their side. “Frankly, people up here in the Flathead, they don’t trust the mainstream media, but they do trust the Main Street media. We’re not seen as ‘the media,’ we’re just Beacon reporters. I was born and raised in Montana, so that helps. I know about firearms. I hunt and fish. I come from a military family, so I can find a traditionally masculine conversation thread which changes the tone. It becomes, ‘Oh, she’s Montanan, not a lady reporter here to fuck up my life.’”’

There’s a lot to – as they say – unpack there.
Original source: The cost of reporting while female

Link: The cost of reporting while female

‘Priddy’s particular safety is also a matter of local specificity: Most residents think she’s on their side. “Frankly, people up here in the Flathead, they don’t trust the mainstream media, but they do trust the Main Street media. We’re not seen as ‘the media,’ we’re just Beacon reporters. I was born and raised in Montana, so that helps. I know about firearms. I hunt and fish. I come from a military family, so I can find a traditionally masculine conversation thread which changes the tone. It becomes, ‘Oh, she’s Montanan, not a lady reporter here to fuck up my life.’”’

There’s a lot to – as they say – unpack there.
Original source: The cost of reporting while female

Good journalism looses money?

Conservatively, counting just the biggest chunks of staff time that went into it, the prison story cost roughly $350,000. The banner ads that appeared on the article brought in $5,000, give or take. Had we been really in your face with ads, we could have doubled or tripled that figure—but it would have been a pain for you, and still only a drop in the bucket for us.

From Mother Jone’s commentary one one of it’s recent mega stories on the prison system.

Yeah: the business model for journalism is not good right now. Put another way: figuring out how to fund reporters lives while they work on The Good Stuff is hard.

The first time blogging won

Since The Huffington Post was founded 11 years ago, it has become one of the biggest online media organizations, known for its all-caps headlines. In 2011, the publication was acquired by AOL for $315 million, a hefty price tag that signaled the rise of digital media.

The publication won a Pulitzer Prize in 2012 and has expanded globally in the last several years. It has a robust staff that writes original articles, but it is also known for aggressive aggregation, a practice that has at times caused tension in the media industry.

The “HuffPo” and others (many in the AOL/Verizon empire now) formed a sort of apex of blogging, akin to that big wave Hunter Thompson saw out his Vegas hotel window. We don’t really even think of “blogging” much anymore, just publishing.

Source: How the Arab World Came Apart
Arianna Huffington Stepping Down as Huffington Post Editor in Chief

The destruction of a narrow medium

Ben sums up his take on how “the media” was melted down:

…the destruction of journalism is about the destruction of journalism’s business model, which was predicated on scarcity. In the case of newspapers, printing presses, delivery trucks, and a healthy subscriber base made them the lowest common denominator when it came to advertising, right down to four line classified ads that represented some of the most expensive copy on a per-letter basis in the world.

Source: A Technical Glitch – Stratechery by Ben Thompson