Building the new apps on cloud

Our most recent quarterly Voice of the Enterprise survey research indicates growing demand for Docker and containers. When we asked more than 700 of our extensive network of 12,500 senior IT professionals what their organization’s most common type of application deployment for cloud computing was, more than one-third (34%) said for deploying new applications that they did not have before the cloud.

We are confident that Docker containers represent some portion of this percentage of new applications. We also see Docker and containers playing an increasingly prominent role in other application-deployment priorities, such as modernizing existing applications by moving to hosted software or SaaS (35% of respondents), or migrating existing applications to cloud infrastructure (31% of respondents).

From Jay Lyman at 451.

Building the new apps on cloud

A survey of more than 700 of these industry pros on their organization’s most common type of application deployment for cloud computing indicated 34 percent was for deploying new applications that they did not have before the cloud. Respondents also identified modernizing existing applications by moving to hosted software or SaaS (35 percent) and migrating existing applications to the cloud (31 percent) as most common. Docker and containers will play a prominent role in these applications and efforts.

One of my colleagues, Jay Lyman, and I were on the DevOps Cafe podcast a while back. We talk about DevOps from a mainstream perspective, and a bit about how analyst think about it. The episode was “lost” since our original recording, but is now found and published. There’s also some brief shownotes on their site, and the video of our recording if you prefer that over audio only.

Red Hat updates RHEL 7 for cloud with containers, Windows support and improvements (451 Report)

My colleague Jay Lyman and I wrote up Red Hat’s recent OS release, RHEL 7. Of interest to us, of course, is the work Red Hat is doing with containers. Clients can read the full report, and here’s the 451 Take:

In order to differentiate and draw enterprise interest for RHEL 7, Red Hat is wise to look to new technologies, such as containerization, and make them enterprise-ready. The company will need to find new sources of growth beyond Unix conversion and Windows defection, so its effort to link to other technologies and products – cloud computing, RHEV, OpenStack, OpenShift and devops – will be critical. Growth, we feel, lies in becoming the home for new workloads, and features in RHEL 7 like stripped-down, container-ready Atomic are targeting this opportunity.

If you’re not a client already, apply for a trial to check it out and put my name in as a reference.

Red Hat updates RHEL 7 for cloud with containers, Windows support and improvements (451 Report)

Jay Lyman and myself were on the DevOps Cafe Podcast yesterday, with the video recording up first of course. We discussed the DevOps adoption and mainstream maturity that we see out there in our analyst romping. As Damon mentions, Jay wrote one the original (as he types it) devops analyst reports.

Be sure to subscribe to their podcast feed, as I do, to get the audio version, and listen to all the other episodes. This is one of the best outlets for keepingup with DevOps out there at the moment.