Link: Micro Focus belches as it struggles to digest HPE Software • The Register

“Operational difficulties fed into the financial results for Micro Focus’s half-year ended 30 April 2018 with sales down 8 per cent year-on-year to $1.974bn. Nearly all of the revenue lines were down with the exception of subscription and SaaS.

Licence sales dropped 18.4 per cent to $396.4m, maintenance was down 3.5 per cent to $1.109bn, and consulting dropped 27.5 per cent $149.9m.”

Also, SUSE revenue: “The top line number included an $182.9m contribution in sales from SUSE, which Micro Focus is offloading to a private equity biz for $2.53bn, and was 17.2 per cent higher than a year earlier.”
Original source: Micro Focus belches as it struggles to digest HPE Software • The Register

Link: Preliminary Analysis of the Site Reliability Engineer Survey

If the response takes too long to get to your phone, the system might as well be “unavailable”:

‘If a page takes too long to load a user will consider it to be unavailable. I realized after the fact the nuances of this were not considered in the phrasing of one of our questions. We asked “What service level indicators are most important for your services?” Three of the options were end-user response time, latency, and availability. I view availability as the system up or down, latency as delays before a response is generated and end-user response time as how long before the user received the information they wanted. If an error message appears or the page fails to load, an application is unavailable. If a page takes 10 seconds to load, it’s available but incredibly frustrating to use. For SREs availability means more than is a system up or down. If the response time or latency exceeds a certain threshold the application is considered unavailable.’
Original source: Preliminary Analysis of the Site Reliability Engineer Survey

Link: Preliminary Analysis of the Site Reliability Engineer Survey

If the response takes too long to get to your phone, the system might as well be “unavailable”:

‘If a page takes too long to load a user will consider it to be unavailable. I realized after the fact the nuances of this were not considered in the phrasing of one of our questions. We asked “What service level indicators are most important for your services?” Three of the options were end-user response time, latency, and availability. I view availability as the system up or down, latency as delays before a response is generated and end-user response time as how long before the user received the information they wanted. If an error message appears or the page fails to load, an application is unavailable. If a page takes 10 seconds to load, it’s available but incredibly frustrating to use. For SREs availability means more than is a system up or down. If the response time or latency exceeds a certain threshold the application is considered unavailable.’
Original source: Preliminary Analysis of the Site Reliability Engineer Survey

Link: Preliminary Analysis of the Site Reliability Engineer Survey

If the response takes too long to get to your phone, the system might as well be “unavailable”:

‘If a page takes too long to load a user will consider it to be unavailable. I realized after the fact the nuances of this were not considered in the phrasing of one of our questions. We asked “What service level indicators are most important for your services?” Three of the options were end-user response time, latency, and availability. I view availability as the system up or down, latency as delays before a response is generated and end-user response time as how long before the user received the information they wanted. If an error message appears or the page fails to load, an application is unavailable. If a page takes 10 seconds to load, it’s available but incredibly frustrating to use. For SREs availability means more than is a system up or down. If the response time or latency exceeds a certain threshold the application is considered unavailable.’
Original source: Preliminary Analysis of the Site Reliability Engineer Survey

Link: NASA faces ‘significant’ IT management weaknesses, GAO says

‘GAO seems to concur with the IG’s assessment. “Until NASA addresses these [IT governance] weaknesses, it will face increased risk of investing in duplicative investments or may miss opportunities to ensure investments perform as intended,” the report states.’

Must be tough for the CIO types over there with that report.
Original source: NASA faces ‘significant’ IT management weaknesses, GAO says

Link: Meltdown and Spectre underscore the ongoing need for infrastructure automation

“In the Cloud Foundry scenario, these are embodied by BOSH to automate the infrastructure resource, namely VMs, container clusters, virtual storage and networks, configuration and deployment and Concourse for the development pipeline. Together, these enable organizations to rapidly and consistently patch all applications using the PaaS environment. Together, these enable organizations to rapidly and consistently patch all applications using the PaaS environment.”
Original source: Meltdown and Spectre underscore the ongoing need for infrastructure automation