🗂 Link:

Toyota is working to have 70% of new cars connected globally by 2020, with almost all of those in the U.S. and Japan. Automakers are already using the cloud to generate revenue through telematics insurance and car-sharing services.

Toyota also has talked about using data to alert dealers when cars need servicing, provide information about road and traffic conditions for smart city planning, and inform retailers where their customers are commuting from to allow more targeted marketing.

Source:

Link: Growing Acceptance of Smart Home Devices Will Drive Double-Digit Growth Through 2023, According to a New IDC Forecast

Beyond the first quarter, IDC anticipates the global smart home market will reach 840.7 million units by the end of 2019 and grow to 1.46 billion units by 2023

Source: Growing Acceptance of Smart Home Devices Will Drive Double-Digit Growth Through 2023, According to a New IDC Forecast

DellWorld 2019 coverage, selections

Dell executives have been blunt about their expectations for the impact of 5G and the edge. Dell Technologies Vice Chairman Jeff Clarke told conference attendees that 25% of all data will soon be consumed at the edge through evolving 5G applications. Dell himself was even more expansive, flatly predicting in this interview that compute of data at the edge will be bigger than the public or private cloud.

Source: In gambling mecca, Dell’s founder offers evidence that big bets on multicloud, AI and edge will pay off

Also:

Fifty-five commercial 5G networks will be deployed around the world by the end of 2019, said Malhotra, even though the standards won’t be complete until 2020. Pre-standardisation rollouts aren’t unusual: the same thing happened with 4G, he noted.

Meanwhile, a lot more than normal on the storage angle for all this hybrid cloud stuff.

And, some talk about the company itself:

“Sometimes it occurs organically and sometimes it occurs inorganically,” he said, smirking. “After the combination of EMC and VMware and Pivotal, we are far bigger than any of the individual companies added all together — the revenue synergies have been quite significant.”

Link: MOOvement: A track & trace system for cows

An IoT use case, for tracking cows, that actually helps out the business (in addition to the customers, the ranchers):

Rabobank’s network and financial support helped mOOvement enormously, says Van de Ven. The bank has also benefited from the product. Van de Ven: “Nowadays, you can use satellite images to determine the condition of the grass. Combining that data with precipitation patterns and the GPS data from the cows generates interesting insights for both the farmer and the bank, such as the cows’ condition and what the ideal number of cattle is to graze on the land during a particular period. Using up-to-date information means the bank can make better decisions about financing requests than if it were to use the annual figures from the previous year. MOOvement enables us to serve not only the farmer, but also the bank.”

Source: MOOvement: A track & trace system for cows

Link: AWS’s Snowball Edge

A private cloud box from Amazon:

The Snowball Edge Compute Optimized with GPU includes an on-board GPU that you can use to do real-time full-motion video analysis & processing, machine learning inferencing, and other highly parallel compute-intensive work. You can launch an sbe-g instance to gain access to the GPU.

It has Lamda and EC2 capability, targeted at data
manipulation and getting it into (and out of?) AWS. There’s a lot of IoT stuff in AWS now, opening their platform up to things like smart cities, power grid management, and thermostats and lights and shit.
Original source: AWS’s Snowball Edge

Link: With Emerging Technology Comes Emerging Data Problems

“Enterprises need to think about data traffic patterns in their organizations, Vincent said, and recognize when the traffic no longer flows through a central point (whether public cloud or private cloud) and ready their corporate networks for a whole new traffic flow as part of their digital transformation.”
Original source: With Emerging Technology Comes Emerging Data Problems

Link: Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip. Repeat, an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip

An edge device in every home, office, street corner, etc.

“The way it works is like this: Microsoft makes its system-on-chip (SoC) blueprints available to chip designers, which fabricate the chipset and flog it to IoT device makers. These manufacturers slap the silicon in their products, and run Microsoft’s Linux-based Sphere OS along with their own software on the chip, which connects to Microsoft’s Azure Sphere running on Redmond’s cloud.

Sphere does things like make sure gizmos only run official firmware, and automatically pushes out and installs bug fixes on remote devices, and so on. In the process, the chipmaker moves more silicon, the device vendor gets a turnkey security service to show to customers, and Microsoft gets a cloud customer for the lifespan of the device.”
Original source: Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip. Repeat, an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip

Link: Liberty Mutual embraces AI, blockchain

“The Boston insurer is also testing blockchain software to develop a platform intended to create an audit trail and move money across the business faster, Scerbo says. Blockchain could eventually present carriers with the opportunity to pair the ledger technology with IoT to avoid fraud using connected-car sensors and smart home devices increasingly being adopted by consumers. Collected information would be sent to the blockchain, where it would be distributed to a slew of computers with no need for a middle man.”
Original source: Liberty Mutual embraces AI, blockchain

Link: Digital Twin initiatives set to take enterprise center stage: Gartner

“Gartner revealed the results of a survey which suggests that 48 percent of companies which are already enjoying the benefits of IoT are using, or plan to use Digital Twin by the end of 2018.”
Original source: Digital Twin initiatives set to take enterprise center stage: Gartner

Link: Why Haier Is Reorganizing Itself around the Internet of Things

There’s of course Halo Effect to look at over 5 years with this kind of thing, but here’s a relatively new model for corporate strategic and operational “culture.” Plus, Sheinhardt Wig Company microwaves.
Original source: Why Haier Is Reorganizing Itself around the Internet of Things

Link: Don’t dream big when taking on industrial or enterprise IoT

Stacey says that, even with IoT projects, starting small is good to prove long term ROI. She also describes the problem with doing transformational ROI when the work might just be doing improvements, like adding in more safety to industrial things. This doesn’t measure the creation of a new business ahead of time, innovation, which is an area that up-front ROI/business case stuff is obviously of little value, in trying be precise, at lease.
Original source: Don’t dream big when taking on industrial or enterprise IoT

Link: The era of the cloud’s total dominance is drawing to a close – Life on the edge

A bit of an over-statement. What they want to say is “lots of new computing from IoT and pocket devices,” or something.

“many new applications have to act fast. According to some estimates, self-driving cars generate as much as 25 gigabytes per hour, nearly 30 times more than a high-definition video stream. Before so many data are uploaded, and driving instructions sent back, the vehicle may well already have hit that pedestrian suddenly crossing the street.”
Original source: The era of the cloud’s total dominance is drawing to a close – Life on the edge

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Examples of what a city would do with IoT:

“The private sector has pushed cities in a lot of ways,” she said. “My favorite example is, because Uber and Lyft and other transportation network companies could show you where your ride is on your phone, people started really asking, ‘Well, where’s my snow plow? Where are my services?’ It opened people’s minds to expecting more from the public sector, which is a healthy thing so long as the public sector has enough capacity for it.”
Original source: Meet Kate Garman, Seattle’s smart cities coordinator, tasked with making the city more efficient

Link: Vendors talk about why AzureStack is good for their markets

This is especially true in “industrial Internet of Things” applications, where the likes of ABB and GE collect data from sensors on their equipment and analyze it to help with things like predictive maintenance and capacity planning. Often, for performance and/or security reasons, the compute gear that does the analytics is placed directly on oil rigs, power plants, factory floors, in mines, and so on. Sometimes it’s connected to the cloud, and sometimes it isn’t.

“The message from our customers was, ‘We will only start this journey with you if you can put all the infrastructure we need on our premises, isolated from the internet, so we can be assured of security, of governance, of adequate latency for decision making,’” Ciaran Flanagan, group VP and head of ABB’s Global Datacenter business, said. He predicted that for industrial IoT, between 60 percent and 70 percent of processing, transactions, and data management is going to happen at the edge.
Link to original

Link: Vendors talk about why AzureStack is good for their markets

This is especially true in “industrial Internet of Things” applications, where the likes of ABB and GE collect data from sensors on their equipment and analyze it to help with things like predictive maintenance and capacity planning. Often, for performance and/or security reasons, the compute gear that does the analytics is placed directly on oil rigs, power plants, factory floors, in mines, and so on. Sometimes it’s connected to the cloud, and sometimes it isn’t.

“The message from our customers was, ‘We will only start this journey with you if you can put all the infrastructure we need on our premises, isolated from the internet, so we can be assured of security, of governance, of adequate latency for decision making,’” Ciaran Flanagan, group VP and head of ABB’s Global Datacenter business, said. He predicted that for industrial IoT, between 60 percent and 70 percent of processing, transactions, and data management is going to happen at the edge.
Link to original

Platforms are hard to sell, apps easier

Kevin Ichhpurani, executive vice president of global ecosystem and channels at GE Digital, and corporate officer of GE, told CRN during GE’s Minds and Machines conference in San Francisco last week that channel partners will have more success developing and selling applications around IoT, as opposed to grappling with the long and complex sales cycle of the GE Predix IoT platform itself.

Source: GE Digital Pivots Industrial IoT Sales Focus From Platform To IoT Apps — And Looks To Partners As Sales Engine

The Serverless Revolution Will Make Us All Developers

Consider the case of the connected cows.

The grand unified, cloud/AI/IoT/serverless theory:

That was the essence of the Build keynote: The cloud interprets IoT telemetry, in real time, with AI. And that AI can, in turn, instruct other IoT devices to do things based on its interpretation.

Source: The Serverless Revolution Will Make Us All Developers