Link: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

“What we’re seeing at companies like MetLife or Northern Trust is they’re taking their app and infrastructure management cost, and cutting it in half. Let’s say that you can cut 15 million dollars out of your app and infrastructure management cost, which by the way, some of our customers are at. That’s 50 million dollars you can go spend on innovation. That’s not going to the CEO and saying look, I need another hundred million dollars in my budget. That’s freeing up 50-100 million dollars of your existing budget.”

I assume that jump from $15m to $50m is a typo, or something.
Original source: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

Link: Q&A on the Book Agile Management

“Most of the available maturity models measure the degree to which the agile techniques and tools are deployed. I prefer to look at it from a different angle. First, define what your most important performance indicators are with respect to agility. For instance, time-to-market, employee satisfaction, customer satisfaction, and so on. Then benchmark these, if possible. And also follow their development over time, to determine whether they are improving or not.”
Original source: Q&A on the Book Agile Management

Link: Serverless at Bustle

‘Probably the biggest is: how do you deal with the migration of legacy things? At Bustle we ended up mostly re-architecting our entire platform around serverless, and so that’s one option, but certainly not available to everybody. But even then, the first time we launched a serverless service, we brought down all of our Redis instances — because Lambda spun up all these containers and we hit connection limits that you would never expect to hit in a normal app.

‘So if you’ve got something sitting on a mainframe somewhere that is used to only having 20 connections and then you moved over some upstream service to Lambda and suddenly it has 10,000 connections instead of 20. You’ve got a problem. If you’ve bought into service-oriented architecture as a whole over the last four or five years, then you might have a better time, because you can say “Well, all these things do is talk to each other via an API, so we can replace a single service with serverless functions.”’
Original source: Serverless at Bustle

Docker CEO Steve Singh Interview: All About That Migration To Cloud

The single biggest one is the move to public cloud, and this is where Docker is focused today. This is the number one area that we are putting all our investment in. We have this great container platform that allows you to do a lot of things, but just like any company, we need to pick an area of focus and for us, helping customers take legacy apps, moving them to the Docker platform, and allowing them to run it on any infrastructure because it’s hybrid cloud world, does a couple of things — it drives massive savings for customers, typically 50 percent cost reduction in a cost structure, but it also opens up real opportunities for the customer and our partners to innovate within that environment

Also, this is an insanely good example of a fluffy leather chair conference interview, plus, The Channel filter.

More:

Where does the 50 percent savings come from? A few different areas. The biggest is, honestly, in the mass reduction in number of VMs [virtual machines] and that’s not good or bad, it’s just the reality. The other is that there is a massively increased density factor on compute, and so we can put a lot more workloads on a fewer number of servers. If you are a [company like] Nestle, and you are going to take a bunch of information and business systems and move it to the public cloud, doing a one-to-one move is not necessarily all that advantageous.

Partners:

When I joined Docker I had a good conversation with someone over at Microsoft that said ‘I’d love to partner with you.’ His view was, the more people move to Docker, the more business they get on Azure. In fact, for every dollar we generate, he generates $7.

Momentum and the EBIT(A) chase:

we’re growing at 150 percent-plus year over year and expect that to continue for at least another few years. I’m hoping to get to profitability in mid-2019, and that’s important

Source: Docker CEO Steve Singh On The VMware Relationship, Security, And The Opportunities Around Containers For Partners

Core DevOps (tech) metrics, from Nicole Forsgren

Everyone always wants to know metrics. While the answer is always a solid “it depends – I mean, what are your business goals and then we can come up with some KPIs,” there’s a reoccurring set of technical metrics. Nicole lists some off:

These IT performance metrics capture speed and stability of software delivery: lead time for changes (from code commit to code deploy), deployment frequency, mean time to restore (MTTR), and change fail rate. It’s important to capture all of these because they are in tension with each other (speaking to both speed and stability, reflecting priorities of both the dev and ops sides of the team), and they reflect overall goals of the team. These metrics as a whole have also been shown to drive organizational performance.

And, then, further summarized by Daniel Bryant:

Key metrics for IT performance capture speed and stability of software delivery, and include: lead time for changes (from code commit to code deploy), deployment frequency, mean time to restore (MTTR), and change fail rate.

Also in the interview, a concise DevOps definition:

I define DevOps as a technology transformation that drives value to organizations through an ability to deliver code with both speed and stability.

See the rest.

Pivotal Conversations: The management perspective on transforming Allstate, with Opal Perry

I’m always interested to hear how management manages to change how software is done in large organizations – it can seem impossible! As ever, Allstate provides a fascinating stream of information here, and I was lucky to get the chance to interview Opal Perry there on how Allstate has been doing with all that cloud-native stuff.

Check out the listing on SoundCloud, and be sure to subscribe to the podcast if you like it.

Also, if you want to hear more, Matthew Curry and I had a similar conversation a few weeks ago at OSCON.