DevOps Success Metrics, Nationwide

From an IBM article:

Since adopting [DevOps], Nationwide has achieved a 90 percent on-time software delivery rate (up from 60 percent previously) and a 70 percent increase in users’ system availability. But what’s truly impressive is that, in concert with the increased pace of software delivery, Nationwide reduced critical defects 80 percent and high-level defects by 86 percent, which means the company is delivering higher-quality software faster. Nationwide says it can now “invest more into playing offense” to help the company drive innovation and build new offerings.

See the full-court case study as well.

No one got fired for buying IBM cloud

So what is the impact of IBM’s acquisition of SoftLayer? This analyst believes this acquisition may be a fundamental signal to competitors that the old world of outsourcing is fading and that the only way to the future is delivery of services via an “IT” utility called the cloud. Just consider that 80% of U.S. buyers indicate that they will have transformed 50% of their IT environment to a cloud by 2017 and that they will not have all the resources to manage their own cloud.

David Tapper, IDC

Tapper also covers a good history of IBM getting into “utility computing,” all the way back to 2000-ish, if not 1957.

I met and talked with Tapper at the recent Dell analyst event. I liked him a lot: he was pretty much as abrasive/honest as the UK analysts! As in this piece, what I like is people who bring the full, shaggy-dog context to what seems like a point in time in the IT industry continuum.

Report: IBM, Lenovo x86 server deal hits the skids

Buying IBM’s x86 server business is the quickest way for Lenovo to rocket up the rankings and become the number four server maker in the world, behind IBM and far behind Hewlett-Packard and Dell. The deal would make Lenovo the number three x86 server maker instantly.

Report: IBM, Lenovo x86 server deal hits the skids