Link: Walmart, IBM, and blockchaining the supply chain

A longer piece, including some alternative suggestions from Gartner:

‘When it comes to supply chains, Valdes believes that blockchains could play an important coordinating role. “If you have a fragmented business ecosystem, with many parties who don’t know each other but need to do business, then they could collaborate through a blockchain,” he says. But there’s a catch. “It’s a ‘boil the ocean’ problem,” he says, meaning that it’ll take fundamental shifts in an industry for adoption to take place. Optimistically, he says, it would take a decade for the industry to rearrange itself so that everyone was logging interactions on a blockchain.

‘Valdes argues that a company as dominant as Walmart doesn’t need its suppliers on a blockchain. It can simply ask its vendors to use whatever system it chooses. “They have been very successful because over the years they have built a robust system of record for their supply chain,” he says. “If you were a supplier to them, you would happily accept their centralized version of the truth.”’
Original source: Walmart, IBM, and blockchaining the supply chain

Link: The Contradictions Of IBM’s Platform Strategy

“IBM is a systems company with a very large portion of its revenues and an even larger part of its profits coming from these two platforms, the System z mainframe and the Power Systems – now sometimes called the Cognitive Systems – line. The core systems business – meaning the servers, storage, and networking hardware and the operating systems and transaction processing software plus any financing needed for it – comprises about a third of IBM’s revenues and more than half of its gross profits, by our estimates. Various database and middleware stacks up on top of this, generating even more platform revenues and profits, but this is tougher to peel away.”
Original source: The Contradictions Of IBM’s Platform Strategy

Link: The Contradictions Of IBM’s Platform Strategy

“IBM is a systems company with a very large portion of its revenues and an even larger part of its profits coming from these two platforms, the System z mainframe and the Power Systems – now sometimes called the Cognitive Systems – line. The core systems business – meaning the servers, storage, and networking hardware and the operating systems and transaction processing software plus any financing needed for it – comprises about a third of IBM’s revenues and more than half of its gross profits, by our estimates. Various database and middleware stacks up on top of this, generating even more platform revenues and profits, but this is tougher to peel away.”
Original source: The Contradictions Of IBM’s Platform Strategy

Link: The Platform Matters More Than Ever, The Operating System Less So

“Windows Server 2019 is a case in point, and going through the highlights shows it. Back in the day, when a new Windows Server release came out, everyone was obsessed about its scalability and reliability and how it compared to alternatives such IBM i, a slew of Unix variants (including IBM’s own AIX), and the IBM mainframe platforms: VSE, OS/390, and VM. We all dug through the manuals to see how many processors or cores or threads it could span, how much memory it could address, what the impact of SMP or NUMA clustering was on performance, how the I/O was architected to match whatever new gizmos were on the PCI-Express bus. No one really worries about these things. It is a given that any operating system will exploit hardware, and that most hardware is more than enough for most customers. This is not just an IBM i thing. Certain customers, to be sure, can make use of as many cores Intel can cram into a two-socket server, but for most companies, they are nowhere near the top bin parts and they have much less capable processors running at a lot lower cost and with plenty of excess capacity. It doesn’t matter if it is Windows Server or Linux. The basic workhorse server does not look that different from a Power8 or Power9 machine, and in many IBM i shops, there is far less compute dedicated to IBM i on a single instance than on a Windows Server or Linux machine. The database jobs that most IBM i shops have are fairly modest.”
Original source: The Platform Matters More Than Ever, The Operating System Less So

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?