Link: VMware’s vision – your multi-cloud substrate for enterprise applications

“Support for VMware’s NSX virtual network over AWS Direct Connect links that allow extending network configuration and security policies from an enterprise data center to AWS. It also enhanced NSX features on the AWS Cloud to include better control over intra-cloud traffic and support for micro-segmented security policies. Support for high-speed Direct Connect links also facilitates application and data migration or busting to the cloud. Further smoothing the path to the cloud, VMware introduced what it calls a data center evacuation service that enables the live or scheduled migration of thousands of VMs with no downtime. It also offers a free cost estimation service to help determine the financial implications of cloud placement for different workloads.”
Original source: VMware’s vision – your multi-cloud substrate for enterprise applications

Multi-Cloud Begets Confusion, Calls for Automation

One reason is confusion over how enterprises define multi-cloud: Just over half of those polled defined it as including a combination of either public or private clouds along with on-premise infrastructure. (That is also a widely accepted definition of “hybrid clouds”.) Meanwhile, 23 percent of respondents said multi-cloud includes all three: public and private clouds along with their own datacenters.

Source: Multi-Cloud Begets Confusion, Calls for Automation

Give me less of what I want, and more of what I need

Enterprises don’t need a more modern data center. I repeat, enterprises don’t need a more modern data center. They need to to be able to leverage a variety of data centers that support a variety of services, and they need the I&O team to provide support in order to ensure efficient and effective service delivery. The I&O team cannot be defined by the hardware they own and operate.

“Hybrid cloud ROI isn’t there, and the complexity is huge.”

From Steven Sinofsky:

As an enterprise, the pragmatic thing to do is go public cloud and operate existing infrastructure as legacy, without trying to sprinkle cloud on it or spend energy trying to deeply integrate with a cloud solution. The transition to client-server, GUI or Web all provide ample evidence in failed bridge solutions, a long tail of “wish we hadn’t done that” and few successes worth the effort. As a startup, it will be tempting to work to land customers who will pay you to be a bridge, but that will only serve to keep you behind your competitors who are skipping a hybrid solution. This is a big bet to make in 2015, and one that will be the subject of many debates.

Some good white-collar toolchain commentary too:

Gone are the days where the enterprise productivity ninja was the person who could make the richest document or presentation. The workflow of static information, in large, report-based documents making endless rounds as attachments, is looking more and more like a Selectric-created report stuffed in an interoffice envelope.

Today’s enterprise productivity ninja is someone who can get answers on their tablet while on a conference call from an offsite.

“Hybrid cloud ROI isn’t there, and the complexity is huge.”