🗂 Link: Older People Need Rides. Why Aren’t They Using Uber and Lyft?

More than half of adults over 65 own smartphones, the Pew Research Center has reported. Yet among adults 50 and older, only about a quarter used ride-hailing services in 2018 (a leap, however, from 7 percent in 2015). By comparison, half of those aged 18 to 29 had used them.

Source: Older People Need Rides. Why Aren’t They Using Uber and Lyft?

Link: Camera scanning vehicles result in big jump in parking fines

Before Amsterdam started using scanning vehicles in 2013, the Dutch capital issued 18.5 million euros in parking fines. Last year Amsterdam issued nearly 30 million euros in parking fines, an increase of 61 percent. Before using scanning vehicles, Rotterdam issued 177,895 parking fines in 2014. In 2016 that increased by 86 percent to 330,326, before dropping by 6 percent to 310,684 in 2017. AD did not receive more recent figures from Rotterdam.

Delft saw a 26 percent increase in paring fines, Utrecht saw an increase of 17.5 percent. In The Hague, the parking fines increased by half. Tilburg told the newspaper that its issued fines tripled since it started using scanning vehicles.

Source: Camera scanning vehicles result in big jump in parking fines

Link: Exploring New Ways of Working in New Zealand

Most, if not all, teams I have worked with (in the capacity as the Agile Coach in The Lab) do not know what truly matters to their customers. Through numerous planning sessions with key stakeholders from ‘the business’, they gather requirements for their product development. These plans sound great until you start asking a few questions, for example: ‘What are the biggest problems facing your customers?’, ‘How have you validated the requirements with your customers?’, ‘Will the proposed solution actually work in their context?’. Upon asking these kinds of questions, they quickly understand that the proposed backlog of work is frequently what the business wants, not what their customers need. Using design thinking approach and applying techniques for user research and validation, the teams had the opportunities to understand the need of real customers. Talking to a real customer isn’t that hard, but the insights can be quite profound.

Source: Exploring New Ways of Working in New Zealand

Fix your boring, but immediate problems first

When GDS started in 2011, mobile apps were that day’s special on the fad menu. Ministers all wanted their own. Top officials thought they sounded like a great idea. Delighted suppliers queued up to offer their services to government. We’ll talk about apps in more detail later. For now, all you need to know is that GDS blocked 99% of requests for them. Government wasn’t ready for apps, because the people asking for them didn’t really know what they were for. They just sounded good. The blogpost explaining the apps policy, written by Tom Loosemore in 2013, quickly became the digital team’s most widely read post. 16 We have seen too many chief executives and department heads proudly explain their organisation’s pioneering work on artificial intelligence, say, while in the same breath conceding their back office systems can’t reliably pay employees on time. Or running pilots with connected devices while thousands of their customers still post them cheques. This is not to say that preparing for the future isn’t right and good. Responsible leaders need to keep their eyes on the horizon. The successful leaders are those who can do this while remaining mindful their view will be ruined if they step in something disgusting lying on the floor.

from “Digital Transformation at Scale: Why the Strategy Is Delivery (Perspectives)” by Andrew Greenway, Ben Terrett, Mike Bracken, Tom Loosemore

See more…

Link: Air Force wants to make ‘Kessel Run’ standard in tech acquisition

“You’re probably going to see maybe a directive from us that basically says every acquisition is going to have to have something that looks like Kessel Run from the primes. So you want to have [authority to operate] within three or four weeks, not six years.”
Original source: Air Force wants to make ‘Kessel Run’ standard in tech acquisition

Link: Lessons from the UK Government’s Digital Transformation Journey

It’s probably OK:

In any organisation that’s been around for a while, ways of doing things build up and often disconnect from the reasons they were put in place. Things are cited as “rules” which are really just norms. We had to get really good at working out the difference, and on pushing back on some of those rules to get to the core principles.

Get involved with the backend people:

I know of one government project where the digital team couldn’t even add one extra textbox to their address fields, something users were complaining about, because the backend IT teams were too busy to make the change.

Working with the end user changes staff for the better:

I’ve talked to a lot of teams in large organisations who have taken all the right steps in moving to agile but are still having trouble motivating their teams, and the missing piece is almost always being exposed directly to your users. Whether they’re end customers, or internal users, there’s nothing like seeing people use your products to motivate the team to make them better.

Original source: Lessons from the UK Government’s Digital Transformation Journey

Link: “Gartner also found that there was a greater reliance on third-party developers in governments than other sectors, with more than half saying they used them. This is in contrast to 41 per cent over all the six industries surveyed, which comprised financ

Just over half of government IT work relies on outsourcing, 10% higher than private sector average: “Gartner also found that there was a greater reliance on third-party developers in governments than other sectors, with more than half saying they used them…. This is in contrast to 41 per cent over all the six industries surveyed, which comprised financial services, government, manufacturing, retail, healthcare and education.”

The y/y for the last five years would be interesting to see.
Original source: “Gartner also found that there was a greater reliance on third-party developers in governments than other sectors, with more than half saying they used them. This is in contrast to 41 per cent over all the six industries surveyed, which comprised financ

Link: Three imperatives for federal agencies to capitalize on digital transformation

Just getting some basic design-think in there would probably solve most problems: ‘Nine in 10 respondents believe their agency “needs to spend more time on improving the usability of technology, as opposed to the development of the technology itself.”’
Original source: Three imperatives for federal agencies to capitalize on digital transformation

Link: Airmen given direct access to AOC development process

“Air Force acquisition leaders recognized the current acquisition strategy, in progress since 2009, will not deliver capability to the warfighter fast enough. Today, we terminated the current AOC 10.2 contract with Northrop Grumman in order to take a different approach.”

And:

“Once we field this platform and establish the software pipeline, we will begin the iterative improvement process,” said Sanders.  “That’s where this acquisition process really makes a difference.  The customers, in this case Airmen at the AOCs, are able to communicate their needs directly to developers and see the changes they request within weeks.
Original source: Airmen given direct access to AOC development process

Link: Why We Get the Wrong Politicians by Isabel Hardman review – the travails of being an MP | Books | The Guardian

Sounds like a (rightly) sympathetic, interesting take on being a representative.
Original source: Why We Get the Wrong Politicians by Isabel Hardman review – the travails of being an MP | Books | The Guardian

Link: Project vs. product management, in government

Good discussion of doing product management instead of project management. Also, discussion of user metrics to track design and usability:

“Defining success metrics helps you focus on what’s important in your product and how well it solves the problems you’ve identified. Defining key steps the user must take is also important in order to shine a spotlight on where in the process users are failing. With this data, you can conduct further in-person research to understand why they are failing and devise an even better solution.”
Original source: Project vs. product management, in government

Link: Project management vs. product management

‘That discussion starts with a very concise and useful distinction between project management (the world the government knows) and product management (the world it doesn’t). Project management, they write, is “focused on managing to a plan” — such as managing schedule, budget, risk, policy compliance and then reporting status to stakeholders. “Success for a project manager is delivering a defined scope of work on-time and on-budget,” Johnston and O’Connor note. Product management, meanwhile, “is focused on delivering a product a user wants or needs.” Success for a product manager “is delivering a product that users love — and use to complete tasks (or in the private sector — a product customers will pay for).”’
Original source: Project management vs. product management

Link: Digital operating mode

“So to apply this to a public service, first map your value chain. Identify those areas where you are just providing an intermediary role, which could be replaced by an internet enabled service, that adds little value and just slows things down. Design those roles out of the process, then assemble the tech needed to deliver the new services…. Too often transformation processes skip the value chain mapping element. This leads to fundamental misunderstandings about what benefits services actually deliver to users, and thus miss huge opportunities to improve user experiences and reducing the cost of service delivery. As I have said before, there’s no shortcut around truly understanding the service you are meant to be delivering.”
Original source: Digital operating mode

Link: Digital operating mode

“So to apply this to a public service, first map your value chain. Identify those areas where you are just providing an intermediary role, which could be replaced by an internet enabled service, that adds little value and just slows things down. Design those roles out of the process, then assemble the tech needed to deliver the new services…. Too often transformation processes skip the value chain mapping element. This leads to fundamental misunderstandings about what benefits services actually deliver to users, and thus miss huge opportunities to improve user experiences and reducing the cost of service delivery. As I have said before, there’s no shortcut around truly understanding the service you are meant to be delivering.”
Original source: Digital operating mode

Link: Government CIOs Must Resist Transformation Hype and Focus on Digital Optimization

Some points: