Link: When Culture Doesn’t Translate

Unfortunately, the Thai manager told me, his U.S. colleagues usually didn’t send the agenda until an hour before the call, so his team was unable to prepare. And it struggled to understand what was said during the call, because the U.S. participants spoke too quickly. He also said that the Americans rarely invited comments from the Thais, expecting them to jump into the conversation as they themselves would. But that kind of intervention is not the norm in Thailand, where it is much less common to speak if not invited or questioned. The Thai manager summed up his perspective this way: “They invite us to the meeting, but they don’t suggest with their actions that they care what we have to say.” The Thai team members ended up just sitting on the phone listening—giving the Americans the impression that they had nothing to contribute or weren’t interested in participating.
Original source: When Culture Doesn’t Translate

Link: Squeezing more out of slippery big tech may even take tax reforms

“One-off moves don’t change the fact that tech giants are likely to continue to make vast amounts of money overseas, on which they often pay little tax.”
Original source: Squeezing more out of slippery big tech may even take tax reforms

Meddling with Apple and Chinese Manufacturing

A nice discussion that highlights the complexity id trade policy and, thus, rhe high risks of fucking it up. I like this critique of trade criticism:

What makes Navarro’s critique challenging is that it’s not wholly wrong, at least from the American worker perspective, yet it’s not particularly actionable.

So often, that last part is overlooked: you have to actually be able to on something, despite the past. Until we have time machines, finding flaws and suggesting how we should have fixed them is little use on its own. Sure, you need a good analysis of history to figure out what to do next, but it’s deciding what to do next, and doing it, that count.

Link