054: Eventually, you’ll be selling to Large Enterprises – Software Defined Talk

Summary

With Matt Ray in Australia we discuss the character of the tech scene over in that neck of the woods. We also talk about Oracle’s new positioning as one-stop cloud shop, The Gang of Four/FANG type thinking, and balancing small company culture vs. selling to The Enterprise.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed, or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR: Interested in speeding your software’s cycle time, reducing release cycles, and a resilient cloud platform? Check out the free ebook on Cloud Foundry or take Cloud Foundry for a test drive with Pivotal Web Services. See those and other things at cote.io/pivotal.

Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes, RSS Feed

Show notes

Bonus Links, not covered in show

Recommendations

GitHub is the developer resume, so don’t screw that up for your employees

“In many cases in the big companies and all the small startups, your Github profile is your resume,” explained another former Amazonian. “When I look at developers that’s what I’m looking for, [but] they go to Amazon and that resume stops … It absolutely affects the quality of their hires.”

I’ve been reading The Everything Store, the recent business history of Amazon. Given the culture there, it’s not too shocking to read that Amazon is not big into developers marketing themselves and getting involved in “the community,” as it were.

GitHub is the developer resume, so don’t screw that up for your employees

Press Pass: GitHub Traffic Analytics Comments

Paul Krill asked for some quick input on GitHub’s newly released analytics. Here’s what I sent over for his story:

As the blog post says, it does look like fun, though pretty minor in the grand scheme of things. GitHub has been a major driver of getting the development community to care more about social interactions and collaborations, here, tracking who’s looking at your code and where they’re coming from – standard web analytics stuff. Before GitHub, most of the community around code was pretty faceless: it was just forum posts, really passive users and lurkers around the code. With things like this, and GitHub as a whole, developers can get a better sense for who’s interested in their work. Developers have been learning to use this kind of meta-data in their applications to do A/B testing (is this feature better implemented one way or the other) and it’s interesting to think that they’d do some meta-data navel-gazing on their own code.

Another class of user – marketers – would find this extremely valuable. I like to throw out the idea of “code as marketing” to illustrate the idea that code can be a good source for driving a vendor’s marketing needs. As an example, you can see Rackspace putting out command line tools and other developer SDK-ish things to market to developers. More than just “tools” to use on Rackspace’s cloud, this code is a marketing artifact. Since code is, essentially, the major currency of developers, if you want to do more marketing to them, you need to spray more code their way, hopefully that’s useful. In that instance, marketers will want to intimately track who looks at what on sites like GitHub, and this will give them an even more complete picture.

Press Pass: GitHub Traffic Analytics Comments