🗂 Link: How Couples Share “Cognitive Labor” and Why it Matters – Behavioral Scientist

When I sorted through the hundreds of examples that emerged, I found four primary activities appeared over and over: anticipating a need, identifying options for filling it, deciding among the options, and monitoring the results. Chelsea, for example, noticed her toddler waking up progressively earlier each morning and envisioned her hours of sleep dwindling (anticipation). She reached out to her Facebook network for advice and learned that other parents rely on “okay-to-wake” clocks that turn green when it’s permissible for a child to get out of bed. She sorted through several product sites to familiarize herself with the range of features and price points available (identification) before eventually deciding to buy a higher-end model she could program from her phone (decision-making). Once the package arrived, Chelsea tracked its effects (monitoring): Was her son staying in bed until a reasonable hour? If he was waking up later, but not quite at her target time, should she keep searching for a solution or consider the problem solved?

Source: How Couples Share “Cognitive Labor” and Why it Matters – Behavioral Scientist

Link: Free Solo

Other women have rebelled in smaller, more quotidian ways. “They expect you to get married,” Whoopi Goldberg said in a recent interview in The New York Times Magazine. “Then one day I thought: I don’t have to do this.” Goldberg is an EGOT winner, remember. No woman should feel pressured to adhere to conservative standards, but it is a testament to the intractability of these gendered expectations that a woman as accomplished as Goldberg, someone who in theory has earned the power to do what she wants, would still feel beholden to them. It reminds me of Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Brigid Schulte publishing an op-ed for The Guardian entitled, “A woman’s greatest enemy? A lack of time to herself.” These are extraordinarily accomplished women who still have to fight for the right to solitude, a state which men in the same position no doubt take for granted. Of course it was a man who authored a recent book that went viral for stating that the happiest demographic was unmarried and childless women, as though the record low number of marriages levels somehow required explanation. In fact, the data this behavioral scientist cited indicated that marriage benefited men more than it benefited women. Another survey found that one of the top reasons women cited for not having children was wanting more time for themselves. In other words, choice, not just to reject what they don’t want, but to choose what they do — now and in the future. As Rebecca Traister wrote, “Wherever you find increasing numbers of single women in history, you find change.”

Source: Free Solo

Link: The skills leaders need

people tend to assume that confident individuals are competent, when there is no actual relationship between the two qualities. Those confident people are then promoted. Overconfidence afflicts both sexes, but men more so; one study found that they overestimated their abilities by 30% and women by 15% on average.

Source: The skills leaders need

Link: Elizabeth Holmes and her firm Theranos show why we must stop fetishising entrepreneurs

As well as capturing enduring gender anxieties, the Theranos story is also a reflection of the technological zeitgeist. Gibney believes Holmes was so successful because of Silicon Valley’s “fetishisation of the entrepreneur”. Holmes’s entire persona, after all, seems to have been an exercise in myth-making. She dropped out of college, like Mark Zuckerberg. She borrowed Steve Jobs’s trademark black turtleneck and bizarre eating habits. She faked a deep baritone to make herself more authoritative. If you were to come up with a piece of performance art reflecting our expectations of “tech geniuses”, you could not have done a better job than Holmes. What an incredibly scary thought.

Source: Elizabeth Holmes and her firm Theranos show why we must stop fetishising entrepreneurs

Link: The still-coherent culture that is the United States

Social stuff: ‘Maybe this is the most important result: since 1976 there has not been much divergence between liberal and conservative attitudes toward civil liberties or law enforcement. The divergence on government spending is noticeable but not enormous (see p.39). the divergence on “Marriage, Sex, Abortion” is quite large. In another words, the true polarization is happening across gender issues, as I’ve argued numerous times in the past.’
Original source: The still-coherent culture that is the United States

Link: Amy Chozick’s book is about Hillary Clinton — and all the things reporters don’t write in their stories about Hillary Clinton

“I think her career is going to be such a symbol of how we viewed powerful women in this period of American history, that it’s going to be incredibly important and studied for decades,” she said. “The fact the last chapter of her political career was up against this candidate who was bragging about sexually assaulting women, and had a known history of insulting women, it was such a confluence of forces.”
Original source: Amy Chozick’s book is about Hillary Clinton — and all the things reporters don’t write in their stories about Hillary Clinton

Link: Avengers: Infinity War: Marvel’s Superhero Hair Is Full of Secrets

“To put it in a nutshell, the shorter the hair, the more precarious a character’s relationship with traditional femininity.”
Original source: Avengers: Infinity War: Marvel’s Superhero Hair Is Full of Secrets

Link: The sky’s the limit

‘But China could add 13% to its GDP by 2025, relative to a baseline, if it increased women’s employment, hours and productivity as quickly as the leading countries in its region or peer group, McKinsey says. That would translate into an extra $2.6trn by 2025 (an economy the size of France). In India the relative gain could be even greater (18%), because it has far more room for improvement. McKinsey’s scenario would require 37% of Indian women to be in the workforce, up from 27% now.’
Original source: The sky’s the limit

Link: For Women and Minorities to Get Ahead, Managers Must Assign Work Fairly

“For many women, the disparity in assignments comes back to what we’ve called maternal wall bias — a set of negative assumptions about mothers’ competence and commitment. After having a child, mothers come back to work to find that their best projects and clients have been reassigned to colleagues. In some cases, women report that it takes years to get back to the type of work they were doing before taking maternity leave. As a white female lawyer reported, “I made partner in the shortest time of any female. Things were great. I had my son. I worked part-time during leave and came back in nine weeks. My work was gone. It has taken two years and a change in focus to get back to the level I was at.”
Original source: For Women and Minorities to Get Ahead, Managers Must Assign Work Fairly

Link: Driving Diversity Change In a “Problematic” World

“If you’ve ever had to plan a long project — getting to the end state can seem so difficult and impossible. The work that takes to get there is painful and fraught with peril and compromises. We think the path to success looks like a nice, neat flowchart. We think change comes from the top down, or the bottom up, when in reality it’s a bunch of arrows coming from a variety of crazy directions, with missteps and everything in-between.”
Original source: Driving Diversity Change In a “Problematic” World

Link: Why men need more consideration in the women in tech debate

Having to watch the kids is a big problem
For gender imbalance in the workforce. Maybe dads can step the fuck up: “It’s also about asking men to ask for paternity leave. The amount of men that I know that say, well I’m given two weeks and that’s it. They don’t push it, they don’t even have the conversation with their boss. If they don’t step up to also try to equalize it, things won’t change…. I was asked time and time again who’s going to look after my kid. The attention went too far.”

Also: “I’m particularly interested in, and in support of, AbdulJaleel’s comment around seeing more men leaving leadership roles as a way of tackling the gender imbalance.”
Original source: Why men need more consideration in the women in tech debate

Link: Foreign-Born Engineers Dominate Bay Area Tech Jobs

“Nearly three-quarters of Silicon Valley women who work in computer, mathematical, architectural, and engineering occupations were born outside of the U.S., mostly in Asia. That includes nearly 79 percent of those in computer and mathematical professions. The data showed slightly more than 70 percent of men in those professions are foreign born.”
Original source: Foreign-Born Engineers Dominate Bay Area Tech Jobs

Link: The parent trap: can you be a good writer and a good parent?

“I had experienced being judged as a mother, when I periodically left my son with my husband from the age of six months – he is six now – to go away to write. I only departed for a week at a time. But who knows what I might have done had I lived in 1940s Southern Rhodesia, trapped in a life of coffee mornings and sundowners, worrying, as Lessing did, that the time when she could openly be herself might never come.”

Original source: The parent trap: can you be a good writer and a good parent?

Link: The cost of reporting while female

‘Priddy’s particular safety is also a matter of local specificity: Most residents think she’s on their side. “Frankly, people up here in the Flathead, they don’t trust the mainstream media, but they do trust the Main Street media. We’re not seen as ‘the media,’ we’re just Beacon reporters. I was born and raised in Montana, so that helps. I know about firearms. I hunt and fish. I come from a military family, so I can find a traditionally masculine conversation thread which changes the tone. It becomes, ‘Oh, she’s Montanan, not a lady reporter here to fuck up my life.’”’

There’s a lot to – as they say – unpack there.
Original source: The cost of reporting while female

Link: The cost of reporting while female

‘Priddy’s particular safety is also a matter of local specificity: Most residents think she’s on their side. “Frankly, people up here in the Flathead, they don’t trust the mainstream media, but they do trust the Main Street media. We’re not seen as ‘the media,’ we’re just Beacon reporters. I was born and raised in Montana, so that helps. I know about firearms. I hunt and fish. I come from a military family, so I can find a traditionally masculine conversation thread which changes the tone. It becomes, ‘Oh, she’s Montanan, not a lady reporter here to fuck up my life.’”’

There’s a lot to – as they say – unpack there.
Original source: The cost of reporting while female

Link: Women Once Ruled Computers. When Did the Valley Become Brotopia?

“There is another story to tell: that Google’s success had at least as much to do with women like Wojcicki, Sandberg, and—her controversial tenure as CEO of Yahoo! notwithstanding—Mayer. Each of them brought wider skill sets to the company in its earliest days. If subsequent managers at Google understood this lesson, that might have quieted the grumbling among engineers who had a narrow idea of what characteristics made for an ideal employee. Google’s early success proved that diversity in the workplace needn’t be an act of altruism or an experiment in social engineering. It was simply a good business decision.”
Original source: Women Once Ruled Computers. When Did the Valley Become Brotopia?

Link: America’s bias against working moms comes down to one question: Do you value your female employees or not?

Based on a 2013 survey, but still, fucked up:

“According to Pew, some 40% of Americans believe it is bad for society if women work, despite the fact that 40% of American households are supported by female breadwinners.”
Original source: America’s bias against working moms comes down to one question: Do you value your female employees or not?