White men to women and minorities in tech: We just DGAF

Less than 5% of white men surveyed said they considered a lack of diversity a top problem. Three-out-of-four respondents were unaware of any initiatives to make their companies or portfolios more diverse. And 40% of male respondents were sick of the media going on and on about it.

Meanwhile, in political land:

the more privileged you are, the less that oppression personally affects you, the less urgency you perhaps have to get involved in the fight.

And:

According to Shireen Mitchell, activist and founder of Digitalsista, much of the reason women of color are so often on the front lines is because it’s work that needs to be done, and they don’t see anyone else stepping up. “Women of color are always taught to build community to get things done, and in my opinion, most white men are taught that they can only succeed if they are the ‘savior’ for the community. With this mindset, they know they can’t really do that job when it comes to inclusivity because of their inherent bias.”

As those stats on hiring above show, there’s plenty of room for white men to try new ideas out, e.g.:

That leads to white people, especially white men, waiting to act until they feel they will be acknowledged and congratulated for their work. “What we need is for them to take initiative, grow from being uncomfortable and making mistakes. Use their privilege to elevate those who are taking the lead and not add to taxing or using their labor,” says Mitchell.

Link

The truth about the gender wage gap

Goldin’s research has found that workers in the industries with large wage gaps are more likely to say their jobs value those who “develop constructive and cooperative working relationships” and that their company generally determines their “tasks, priorities, and goals.”

And in these situations, both working a lot and having the flexibility to be away from children “after hours” pays off. So, because women are the primary care givers, they take a big wage cut because they have schedule demanding jobs. This doesn’t remove all the of the wage gap as the women-with-no-kids and pharmacists examples show, but it removes a large chunk.

There also a devilish economic decisions that, among many other things, enforces the choice for women to be the primary care givers. If men already make more money, their wages have further to fall, so, mean more top-line revenue loss:

She found that men see their salaries decrease more than women when they switch to a part-time schedule for a year.

“It seems that men in the legal profession who take on non-traditional gender roles (i.e., taking responsibility for child care) pay a high price for that behavior,” Noonan and her study co-authors write.

If the workplace penalizes men more than women for taking breaks from work, then it could be the wiser financial decision for a mother to take on more caregiving activities. — the decision that society overwhelmingly expects.

This is all a shitty situation for family.

Source: The truth about the gender wage gap

“Not relevant”

Mr. Feig, like Ivan Reitman before him, has assembled a workmanlike action-comedy about people at work. Professionalism may be the opposite of gonzo, but I think there’s something (dare I say it) radical about how job-focused this story is. Here’s a movie about female friendship and collegiality — which, of course, also entails rivalry, miscommunication and shifting allegiances — that feels no need to entangle any of its heroines in a heterosexual romance plot. Ms. Wiig’s character is distracted by the hotness of her secretary (I was reminded of Zero Mostel in the original “Producers”), but the real emotional stakes are between her and Ms. McCarthy. We don’t know if any of the Ghostbusters are gay, bi, straight, married, single, celibate, polyamorous or whatever. It’s not relevant.

Meanwhile:

To cite (again) just one bummer study: From 2007 to 2014, women made up 30.2 percent of all speaking or named characters in the 100 top-grossing fictional films released in the United States.

Source: “So That’s Who You Call: The Politics of the New ‘Ghostbusters’”

What My Uterus Can Teach You About Being a Tech Leader

“You know, I’d love to get coffee afterwards with anyone — man or woman — who wants to talk about raising kids while working full time, but right now I think the audience really wants to hear about how I’m leading a revolution in robotics.”

What My Uterus Can Teach You About Being a Tech Leader

Stefanovic, who co-presents Channel Nine’s Today show with Lisa Wilkinson, has been wearing the same blue suit – day in, day out, except for a few trips to the dry cleaner – to make a point about the ways in which his female colleagues are judged. “No one has noticed,” he said. “No one gives a shit.”

The (female) Guardian journalist who wrote about my talk at Boring 2012 didn’t believe I was interested in IBM tills until I started giving my (partially elaborated) history of growing up near an IBM plant, as a small girl playing with electronic components etc. Like it’s simply unfeasible for a woman to have an interest of their own, of any level of intensity, without a ‘sweet’ context.

@Finalbullet, on being sweet