Link: European privacy regulations predicted to damage digital advertising revenue

“Citi cites forecasts that ePrivacy could trigger a 70% reduction in European display ad revenue, and a 33% cut in digital ad budgets, either of which could eviscerate Facebook and Google, at least under their current business model.”

The narrative that these are “tech companies,” at at least that these are the only tech companies, still drives me crazy. For example, are IBM, Microsoft, and Oracle in that bucket. Aside from advertising at Bing, clearly not. So called “tech companies” in this discussion should be called “advertising companies.”
Original source: European privacy regulations predicted to damage digital advertising revenue

Link: GDPR Seen Slowing AI Innovation

Given all the Facebook stuff, I think less balancing towards the side of the robots would probably probably be good:

‘A recent study advocating a U.S. strategy for developing machine intelligence also noted the potential barriers to development that include GDPR and other data privacy efforts. The study released by the Center for Strategic and International Studies warned that the shift to “data localization” will require “balancing legitimate concerns around privacy and consumer protection both in the United States and abroad with the need for an open, flexible data ecosystem that supports innovation and experimentation in AI.”’
Original source: GDPR Seen Slowing AI Innovation

Link: GDPR requests to take thousands of hours a month, says survey

“Large enterprises expect to get an average 246 GDPR enquiries per month, for which they will need to search 43 databases (seven minutes per search). They will spend more than 1,259 hours on this, which equates to nearly 60 hours of searches per working day or 7.5 employees dedicated solely to GDPR enquiries.”

It’s a database management company doing the survey, but still a good wet finger in the wind
Original source: GDPR requests to take thousands of hours a month, says survey

Link: GDPR compliance – here are the 14 things you actually need to do

Exciting new audit needs ahead, hoss: “Organisations should review their IT systems and procedures to check they comply with GDPR requirements for privacy by design, ensuring only the minimum amount of personal data necessary is processed. Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) should be completed when using new technologies and the data processing is likely to result in a high risk to individuals.”
Original source: GDPR compliance – here are the 14 things you actually need to do