[Link] ‘No skinny jeans’: Gen Z launch TikTok attack on millennial fashion

According to market research company Edited, sales of men’s relaxed-fit jeans have increased by 15% and women’s wide-legged jeans are up 97%. The skinny v baggy online debate not only exposes a generational divide but other socioeconomic truths, too. “This is about issues of ‘taste’ but they intersect with issues of class, age, location, gender,” says McClendon.

This would make for a good, New Yorker style essay on many topics, if not just the jeans themselves. Like: what does it say about culture and how does it explain everyday psychology.

Original source: ‘No skinny jeans’: Gen Z launch TikTok attack on millennial fashion

What’s the big deal with 5G?

I’m never really sure what the deal with 5G is. I mean: better networking, sure. But is that such a huge deal? It feels like getting all excited about going from cast iron pipes to PVC.

Here’s some 5G background and commentary in this interview:

I don’t expect the highest 5G standards to be met until the middle of the decade, if ever, there’s a lot that has to happen before 5G delivers ultra-low latency of one millisecond. Average download downlink speeds of up to 20 gigabits per second, or handoffs at speeds as high as you know, 500 kilometers per hour. I’m just not confident those standards will be met anytime soon.

And, a tangible benefit for us consumers:

Among those promises, I think its potential to replace broadband at home or in the office could have the greatest impact. I mean, it’s just ridiculous that so many of us are still paying for at least two connectivity services today, we have our mobile plans and fixed broadband. In most cases. If mobile operators can deliver reliable broadband like speeds that will finally break the hold that cable and other internet service providers have on so many of us. I think all of us could use the savings that would provide more now than ever. Not sure we’ll get there, but I remain hopeful.

Original source: 7 Layers Interview: Matt Kapko ‘5G is easily one of the most overhyped technologies’

COBOL is just fine

More than likely, those government systems going doing was due to too much traffic, not COBOL.

“Cobol isn’t cool, but businesses don’t care about what’s cool,” Klinect says. “They care about what works.”

Also:

The New Jersey Office of Information Technology website doesn’t list any job openings, for Cobol programmers or anyone else. Rather, it’s seeking volunteers to help it meet its challenges. In other words, it’s asking people who might have high-paying jobs elsewhere to work for free. Ensuring that people can file for unemployment during the pandemic is a worthy cause. But it’s easy to see why the talent to do it might be scarce.

Really – eye-roll!

Original source: Can’t File for Unemployment? Don’t Blame Cobol

People focus on the trivial because it’s comfortable

"The Law of Triviality states that the amount of time spent discussing an issue in an organization is inversely correlated to its actual importance in the scheme of things. Major, complex issues get the least discussion while simple, minor ones get the most discussion."

This concept as a tool is about learning how to place value in a task. Your tendency will be to solve problems that you understand, that seem easy to solve. Sometimes those are important, sometimes harder tasks are important. You have to know which outcome is better, what you want.

Of course, it goes the other way too: just because a task is difficult or confusing doesn’t mean it’s valuable.

Original source: Why We Focus on Trivial Things

Americans probably aren’t as crazy as they appear

Two-thirds of registered Texas voters agree with decisions by Gov. Greg Abbott and several local officials to suspend nonessential business operations. And more than three-quarters of voters support orders to stay home except for essential activities. The poll’s findings come as Abbott says he will soon announce plans to reopen a wide range of Texas businesses.

Original source: Texas voters overwhelmingly approve of business closures, stay-at-home orders despite blow to state’s economy, says UT/TT poll

Less voices, better meetings

The key is to recognize that the available input on an issue doesn’t all need considering. The most informed opinions are most relevant. This is one reason why big meetings with lots of people present, most of whom don’t need to be there, are such a waste of time in organizations. Everyone wants to participate, but not everyone has anything meaningful to contribute.

Original source: Why We Focus on Trivial Things

Creating and gardening your personal brand

Building a reputation or brand is hard. Sustaining it over time is extremely hard. As my colleague Coté told me, you have to “show up a lot and for a long time.” It takes intentional planning, and ongoing effort. It’s hard to just stumble into a durable personal brand. You need to make conscious choices. Worth it? I think so. In no particular order, here’s what I’ve learned about building and sustaining personal brands.

Original source: Looking to build or sustain a personal brand in technology? Here are 10 things I’ve learned.

Consumer tech for the enterprise, enterprise tech for the consumer

'One major difference between Microsoft and Google, in Soltero’s view, is that Google is able to more naturally move across the worlds of consumer and enterprise technology. For Microsoft, he said, this was “just a very difficult thing for them to reconcile,” in his experience.

He said he has been helping the G Suite team “appreciate the unique opportunity that we have to not be conflicted by our role as both a consumer and an enterprise company, in a way that I just constantly saw Microsoft really struggle with.” Google has the ability to “not even bother with those distinctions” and focus on making products that people want to use, he said.

Original source: Google is getting a bigger grid: G Suite chief on Microsoft, Zoom and the new world of collaboration