SUSE to Acquire HPE’s OpenStack, Cloud Foundry Portfolio, Boost Kubernetes Investment, TheNewStack

“We see PaaS as a strategic component of our software-defined infrastructure and application platform strategy,” stated SUSE President of Strategy, Alliances and Marketing Michael Miller, in a note to The New Stack, “and Cloud Foundry as the open source project and technology that brings together the best innovation and industry collaboration. We want to leverage that innovation for the benefit of our customers, and we have a vision for the convergence of CaaS technologies [in SUSE’s case, Containers as a service] like Docker and Kubernetes and PaaS technologies like Cloud Foundry that we think will address the real-world needs of our customers and partners. We will now work with the Cloud Foundry community to develop that vision.”

http://thenewstack.io/suse-add-hpes-openstack-cloud-foundry-portfolio-boost-kubernetes-investment/

The Container Landscape, choosing what to do now

A round-up of all sorts of container stacks, and some advice on what to do:

Therefore, the key lessons learned from this event (from developer’s perspective): Do not focus on developing code for the container under the hood. Care instead about the business logic. Implement your microservices in a vendor agnostic way.

Do not make the same fault as we all did with J2EE / Java EE where all vendors used the same standard specifications, but still offered many vendor-dependent features and “added value” in their specific “standard implementation”. Migration, i.e. deployment to another Java EE application server was a lot of efforts (re-development, testing, …); sometimes a complete re-write was easier and faster.

There’s a lot of fragmentation in container land now. This is what Linux must have felt like back in the late 90s.

Our advice at Pivotal, of course, is to focus on using Spring and other services towards the top of the stack for that layer of lock-in protection.

Link

VMware’s Foundation is a solution bundling of hybrid cloud software

Think of Cloud Foundation as a grouping of VMware’s existing services for staging virtual workloads and virtual storage into a stack that is more conducive to managing a hybrid cloud. The off-premise part of that cloud comes from major public cloud providers: Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform, as well as IBM Cloud and VMware’s own vCloud Air. Gelsinger stated Monday that Cloud Foundation’s support for staging and managing workloads on the “Big Three” platforms comes by way of working with their respective public APIs, not through any direct partnership or interaction between VMware and other firms.

And, on the target market:

[T]they made it very clear that Cloud Foundation wasn’t pursuing telcos and communications carriers, but mid- to large-size enterprises in general.

VMware also previewed a SaaS service for tracking cloud costs:

The key objective of this component is to keep track of public cloud resource consumption across public clouds: AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, IBM Cloud, and VMware’s vCloud Air and vCloud Air Network (still separate items). An administrator can perform service discovery of active applications across multiple clouds, cost analysis of resources consumed in each of these public clouds, and monitoring of active status.

Source: VMware Reassembles Its Cloud Stack with a New ‘Foundation’