Link: The Insurance Industry Is A Prime Target For AI Technologies And Solutions

Quote below:

  • Technologies Oriented & Experience Focused: Experience related AI technologies include virtual assistant, speech analytics, and recommendation engines. These technologies are being adopted in customer service and insurance product selection business activities.
  • Technologies Oriented & Operational Focused: Operational AI technologies comprises text analytics, advanced analytics, facial and image recognition, machine learning and natural language generation. Most of these AI technologies are being adopted to improve operational efficiencies. However facial recognition and machine learning are being used to mitigate the risk exposure of insurers.
  • Solutions Oriented & Experience Focused: The two experience focused AI solutions concentrate on providing a positive customer experience. The solutions combine multiple AI technologies to create conversational solutions and industry pre-trained solutions. The latter is also being used to train internal customer facing roles.
  • Solutions Oriented & Operational Focused: As machine learning has grown in maturity, we find insurers combining other AI technologies with machine learning to create deep learning solutions. Currently, risk management is the focus area of deep learning solutions.
    Original source: The Insurance Industry Is A Prime Target For AI Technologies And Solutions

Link: Fintech Has Grown Up

“Fintech has lost its direct-to-consumer ambition. Previous editions of Finovate have seen presentations by now established brands like Fidor Bank, eToro, Kabbage, rPlan, and Scalable Capital. Most of these startups have since shifted their business model from just direct to customers – consumers or businesses – to some form of B2B2C, working with incumbents as their distribution partners. That’s because despite all the claims about incumbents neglecting their customers’ needs, customer acquisition in financial services remains hard and expensive.”
Original source: Fintech Has Grown Up

Link: Fintech Has Grown Up

“Fintech has lost its direct-to-consumer ambition. Previous editions of Finovate have seen presentations by now established brands like Fidor Bank, eToro, Kabbage, rPlan, and Scalable Capital. Most of these startups have since shifted their business model from just direct to customers – consumers or businesses – to some form of B2B2C, working with incumbents as their distribution partners. That’s because despite all the claims about incumbents neglecting their customers’ needs, customer acquisition in financial services remains hard and expensive.”
Original source: Fintech Has Grown Up

Docker and kubernetes

Dave Bartoletti, an analyst with IT consultancy Forrester, said it’s clear that Kubernetes has won at the orchestration layer. “There’s too much mindshare around it,” he said in a phone interview with The Register. “There are too many developers who just want this.”

Pretty much everyone has the sentiment that kubernetes has won.

More details from Joseph Tsidulko at CRN:

While some components of Enterprise Edition previously could be made to work with Kubernetes, the crucial control plane for managing the lifecycle of containerized applications was incompatible. Docker, however, had participated in the Kubernetes project, and always believed the technologies were complementary, Chanana said.
Docker is now focused on building out the components needed to make Kubernetes an enterprise-grade solution, just as it did with Swarm, he said, including security, high availability, and ease of use through its existing tools and control plane. Those are capabilities Docker uniquely can deliver to ease a lot of the struggles customers face in taking advantage of Kubernetes’ advanced container-scheduling capabilities.

Source: Kubernetes has won. Docker Enterprise Edition to support rival container-wrangling tech

Training developers in person, then going back home

From an interview with Jeffrey Hammond and Marc Cecere on developer skills gaps. Here, the trend to training with people in person and then (slowly) going back “home”:

[Hammond:] One of the things I think you see is it– so many companies have used the words, partnering model, for years, and it’s been more or less lip service. But you do see a little bit more of a partnering and more highly tailored model. As an example, if you look at some of the projects that we see companies like a Pivotal or an IBM running these days, they may actually start in a garage that is near the organization so in San Francisco, or in London, or in New York City, but they start off-site. And the client’s developers, the client’s business personnel, go to those rooms, those war rooms if you will, and start work. Now, over time, some of that work may migrate offshore, or migrate back to the client. In the case of Pivotal, they’ll run multiple teams through their centers. Allstate is a really good example where they have I think over 100 developers and have kind of been through that process now, and they’ve drained their local talent pool. But it’s much less a, “This is the work we need to do and here’s the requirements and here’s the scope and let’s put this out to bid.” It’s much more a business transformation or a re-engineering type of project that is very high-touch. And I don’t see companies being able to do that if they’re not at least down the street from their clients and from their development shops. So I think it changes the nature of the types of engagement. I think it’s one of the reasons that you’ve seen so many of the large systems integrators buying agency talent as quickly as they can, because when you look at the sort of design experience techniques that are used, journey mapping, ethnography, those sorts of things, at least right now they still tend to be very custom – almost a manual process. You see sticky notes up on walls. You see war rooms. You see an environment that is kind of hard to capture from a remote, tool-based sort of delivery model.

Source: The Battle For Talent, Forrester

There’s still a lot of agile to be rolled out

Diego Lo Giudice, vice president and principal analyst with Forrester Research, is one of those who thinks that companies haven’t really adopted Agile as they should have done. “I would say that we’re going to see more Agile because we haven’t done it well enough yet,” he told The Reg. “Organisations say they’re doing it, but they’re struggling to scale it.”

One of the more shocking “turns out” to most of my talks is just this: just under 20 years later, the industry still doesn’t do that much agile.

Source: The dev-astating truth: What’s left to develop? Send in the machines

Link: Don’t make the mistake of thinking the CIO is irrelevant – TechRepublic

“The world isn’t about to end, however. Yes, Forrester reveals in its “Understanding Shifting Technology Acquisition Patterns” research note that lines of business are taking on a greater role in technology purchasing, removing IT from the purchasing process in 6.3% of new technology purchases in 2013, rising to 7.2% in 2015, while IT-only purchases will fall from 23.7% (2013) to 21.6% (2015).”

From 2014.

Source: Don’t make the mistake of thinking the CIO is irrelevant – TechRepublic