Link: Eden: The Tech That’s Bringing Fresher Groceries to You

Wal-mart using ML and analytics to keep food fresher:

“For example, take everybody’s favorite, the banana. This tasty fruit is consistently among the best-selling grocery items in Walmart’s U.S. stores. Bananas travel from seven countries in Latin America to over 4,000 stores in the U.S. On such a long road, what happens to those bananas if temperatures in the container trucks exceed acceptable ranges? In the future, Eden will be able to recalculate the freshness factor and re-route the shipment immediately. The bananas end up in a closer store to optimize freshness, consumers take home a delicious bunch, and everyone is happy.

Eden also helps eliminate food waste. Our goal is to eliminate $2 billion in waste over the next five years. Already, Eden is being used in 43 distribution centers and has prevented $86 million in waste from happening.

What was once a manual inspection process is now more efficient and thorough than ever.”
Original source: Eden: The Tech That’s Bringing Fresher Groceries to You

Link: Eden: The Tech That’s Bringing Fresher Groceries to You

Wal-mart using ML and analytics to keep food fresher:

“For example, take everybody’s favorite, the banana. This tasty fruit is consistently among the best-selling grocery items in Walmart’s U.S. stores. Bananas travel from seven countries in Latin America to over 4,000 stores in the U.S. On such a long road, what happens to those bananas if temperatures in the container trucks exceed acceptable ranges? In the future, Eden will be able to recalculate the freshness factor and re-route the shipment immediately. The bananas end up in a closer store to optimize freshness, consumers take home a delicious bunch, and everyone is happy.

Eden also helps eliminate food waste. Our goal is to eliminate $2 billion in waste over the next five years. Already, Eden is being used in 43 distribution centers and has prevented $86 million in waste from happening.

What was once a manual inspection process is now more efficient and thorough than ever.”
Original source: Eden: The Tech That’s Bringing Fresher Groceries to You

Link: My advice for a Paris visit

“If you want to spend forty euros for a very good but not revelatory lunch, find a “cool” area with lots of restaurants and poke your head in at their opening, at 12:30, to ask for a table. By 12:45 it is too late and you are screwed and back to your favorite cheese shop. By the way, I don’t think Paris is the best city in which to spend $200 on a meal.”

Exiled to your favorite cheese shop. Tragic!
Original source: My advice for a Paris visit

The internet of food nutrition labels

“So anyone who is producing food that ends up in our grocery stores, we’re working with them to get the data from their labels and the packaging information to come right into the database for us,” Pamela Stark Reed, deputy administrator for Nutrition, Food Safety and Quality, said on Information Management month.

The database has actually existed for over a century, Reed said. But before starting the initiative, it only had about 8,000 entries. Since opening it up to manufacturer submission, ARS has received 80,000 new items, a 1000 percent increase.
And on future plans:

The goal for the database is to eventually expand to 1,000,000 items. Reed said ARS anticipates getting store brand and international food items into the database soon. Some items from chain restaurants may follow.

Because of this, the agency is looking into cloud services to increase its storage capacity.

Just imagine, globally, how many data sets like that there are. Throw in the workflow to injest and cleanup the data, and change it, plus APIs to access it, and you have an almost endless amount of projects for software eating.

http://federalnewsradio.com/information-management-month/2016/11/usda-turns-nutritional-data-open-data/

Gulf oysters

“The whole time I was watching that stupid spill cam with dispersant being injected into the spill, I thought oysters, oysters, oysters,” New Orleans chef Frank Brigsten told local news outlet the Times-Picayune last year.

There’s plenty of people who turn up their nose at gulf oysters. But, growing up on those big, ugly, juicy things, they’re the ones I love best over fancy named, effete tiny ones from other places. Recently, it has been harder to find them. Too bad.

See original story.