Link: Uber Spent $10.7 Billion in Nine Years. Does It Have Enough to Show for It?

“Amazon.com Inc. is famous for its losses over the years. But even in the heyday of the dot-com bubble, the e-commerce giant never came close. Amazon’s biggest loss was in 2000—a $1.4 billion embarrassment, or about $2 billion adjusted for inflation. Most years, Amazon turns a profit, albeit a small one. What Uber backers can point to, though, is a nearly unmatched pace of sales growth. Even as Uber’s revenue reached $2.3 billion in the fourth quarter of 2017, its annual growth rate remained strong, at about 90 percent compared with 2016. That’s faster than most tech companies with a similar valuation. Only one U.S. tech company of Uber’s size, Micron, grew at anything close to that last year.”
Original source: Uber Spent $10.7 Billion in Nine Years. Does It Have Enough to Show for It?

Link: Dropbox S-1 Analysis – The King of Freemium

“Founded in 2007, Dropbox epitomizes the freemium go-to-market. Dropbox has grown from 0 to 500 million users over that time period. 2% of those users convert to paid and pay an average of $9.33 per month. 90% of revenue originates through self serve channels – an astounding figure for company that generated more than $1B in revenue last year.”
Original source: Dropbox S-1 Analysis – The King of Freemium

Link: WSO2: Our 2017 Results and 2018 Plan

2% profit margin is much better than no- or negative-percent.

“In 2017, we will exit our Annualized Recurring Revenue (ARR) between $24.5 — $25.5M, a growth of 52%, up from 46% growth the previous year. Our gross margin for the recurring business is 88%, and will increase in coming years. In 2017, we will turn our first profit with $603K EBITDA and generate $2.7M cash from operations.”
Original source: WSO2: Our 2017 Results and 2018 Plan

Mulesoft to IPO with $187.7m revenue in 2016, losses of $49.6m

The San Francisco-headquartered business revealed it pulled in $187.7m last year, up 170 per cent from its $110.3m in revenue in 2015. Gross profits were just over $138m from $78m, and net losses decreased to a piddling $49.6m, down from $65.4m the year before.

Another take from Barb Darrow, inc.:

Mulesoft has raised $1.5 billion in venture funding from such backers as Lightspeed Venture Partners, Hummer Winblad, and New Enterprise Associates.

Man, that’s a lot of money poured into it since 2006 – “G round.”

Link

Oracle losing legacy software sales, growing (public?) cloud sales

Once again, the key metric of new software license sales was off—falling 19% to $1.35 billion compared to last year, and missing analysts’ expectations of $1.44 billion.

On the other hand:

“Our cloud revenue will be larger than our new software license revenue next fiscal year, when the transition will be largely complete.”

And:

“Our cloud applications goal is to be the world largest and most profitable SaaS company. We are growing our cloud business much faster than Salesforce.com, and we can beat them to the $10 billion mark, but it’s going to be close,” Ellison told analysts on the call.

Also:

Database-as-a-service, which basically runs a company’s database on a third party’s cloud, is a fast-growing category for Oracle, according to the company. In fact, Oracle co-CEO Mark Hurd said that business was up 700% year over year, hitting $100 million in quarterly revenue.

Source: Oracle’s Cloud Business Has Yet to Surpass Its Falling License Sales