Link: Electric car charging interoperability is the next big thing in mobility

The arrangement doesn’t mean EV owners need to run out and add a Hubject account. All of this should be invisible to the end user—Hubject’s actual customers are the charging networks or utilities. Its platform provides an API that different charging networks can use to make that interoperability painless for drivers. “Our software is middleware that runs between network providers in a hub architecture,” Glenney explained.

“For example, an OEM who wants all to be able to display charging stations on their smartphone app and infotainment system would connect to Hubject, and the driver gets real-time dynamic point-of-information of where chargers are, services around there, pictures of the charging station, and so on,” he said. “It will also tell the user if the charger is available, being repaired, and so on. As you drive around, you can access different charging providers as long as they’re on the network.”

Source: Electric car charging interoperability is the next big thing in mobility

Link: Fixing Europe’s zombie banks

Unlike America, where banks have a return on equity of 12%, Europe does not have strongly positive government-bond yields, or a pool of investment-banking profits like that on Wall Street, or a vast, integrated home market. All this is true, but European banks have been lamentably slow at cutting their costs, something which is well within their control. As a rough rule of thumb, efficient banks report cost-to-income ratios below 50%. Yet almost three-quarters of European lenders have ratios above 60%. Redundant property, inefficient technology and bloated executive perks are the order of the day.

And:

And when the next downturn comes and banks need to raise capital, which investor would be foolish enough to give even more money to firms that do not regard allocating resources profitably as one of their responsibilities?

There’s much room and ability to improve the bottom line by fixing the back-office sprawl:

Costs are falling at an annual rate of about 4%, according to analysts at ubs. This is not enough. As consumers switch to banking on their phones there are big opportunities to cut legacy itspending and back-office and branch expenses. Lloyds, in Britain, has cut its cost-income ratio to 49% and expects to get to close to 40% by 2020. The digital German arm of ing, a Dutch bank, boasts a return on equity of over 20% in a country that is supposedly a bankers’ graveyard. If other banks do not do this they will soon find that they have lost market share to new digital finance and payments competitors—both fintech firms and the Silicon Valley giants such as Amazon—that can operate with a fraction of their costs and which treat customers better.

Source: Fixing Europe’s zombie banks

Link: Naspers plans to spin off its Tencent stake and other holdings

Naspers, which started out as an Afrikaans newspaper group a century ago, has since gone on to invest in a host of startups, mostly in emerging markets. The runaway success of Tencent has created an enviable headache: Naspers has become too big for the Johannesburg stock exchange, where it now makes up a quarter of the local index. Such scale requires foreign investors, not all of whom are keen on South Africa’s currency and political risk. Amsterdam, where Naspers already has staff, has similar listing requirements to Johannesburg.

Source: Naspers plans to spin off its Tencent stake and other holdings

Link: Are security concerns over Huawei a boon for its European rivals?

 

Between 2015 and 2018 Huawei’s share rose from 24% to 28%; Nokia’s dipped from 20% to 17% and Ericsson’s from 15% to 13%. An escalation in the war on Huawei might prompt Beijing to retaliate by kicking Western firms out of China.

That would be a blow to the Nordic duo. China accounted for 10% of Ericsson’s 211bn krona ($24.2bn) in global sales last year. The company runs two research and development sites in China. Nokia derives a similar share of revenues from the Chinese mainland, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Extra sales in Europe in the event of a Huawei ban would not offset losses in China, argues Pierre Ferragu of New Street Research, not least because the Chinese will launch 5g a year or two earlier.

More important, worries Börje Ekholm, chief executive of Ericsson, a ban on Huawei would slow down the launch of 5g in Europe

 

Source: Are security concerns over Huawei a boon for its European rivals?

Link: Ferry risky

“Ms Murphy’s own firm is a perfect example. It operates four refrigerated trucks that bring Irish meat to Italy and return with fresh herbs. “From the time the herbs come out of the ground to the supermarket shelf in Ireland it takes about five days, and you are then left with a shelf-life of three to five days,” she says. Making the trip longer reduces the shelf life. Beyond a certain point, it could render the whole enterprise unprofitable.”

Trade is a delightfully complex, yet perfectly quotidian system.
Original source: Ferry risky

Link: Ferry risky

“Ms Murphy’s own firm is a perfect example. It operates four refrigerated trucks that bring Irish meat to Italy and return with fresh herbs. “From the time the herbs come out of the ground to the supermarket shelf in Ireland it takes about five days, and you are then left with a shelf-life of three to five days,” she says. Making the trip longer reduces the shelf life. Beyond a certain point, it could render the whole enterprise unprofitable.”

Trade is a delightfully complex, yet perfectly quotidian system.
Original source: Ferry risky

Link: Ferry risky

“Ms Murphy’s own firm is a perfect example. It operates four refrigerated trucks that bring Irish meat to Italy and return with fresh herbs. “From the time the herbs come out of the ground to the supermarket shelf in Ireland it takes about five days, and you are then left with a shelf-life of three to five days,” she says. Making the trip longer reduces the shelf life. Beyond a certain point, it could render the whole enterprise unprofitable.”

Trade is a delightfully complex, yet perfectly quotidian system.
Original source: Ferry risky

Link: GDPR Seen Slowing AI Innovation

Given all the Facebook stuff, I think less balancing towards the side of the robots would probably probably be good:

‘A recent study advocating a U.S. strategy for developing machine intelligence also noted the potential barriers to development that include GDPR and other data privacy efforts. The study released by the Center for Strategic and International Studies warned that the shift to “data localization” will require “balancing legitimate concerns around privacy and consumer protection both in the United States and abroad with the need for an open, flexible data ecosystem that supports innovation and experimentation in AI.”’
Original source: GDPR Seen Slowing AI Innovation

Link: Info Commissioner tears into Google’s ‘call us journalists’ trial defence

‘This argument enraged the ICO, which said in the submission: “The concept of ‘journalism’ presupposes a process by which content is published to an audience pursuant to the taking of human editorial decisions as to the substantive nature and extent of that content.”… In plain English, humans (mostly) don’t decide what appears in search results so calling Google’s activities “journalism” is just plain wrong, according to the commissioner.’
Original source: Info Commissioner tears into Google’s ‘call us journalists’ trial defence