Link: BMC Touches Clouds with Job Scheduler

The new support for cloud platform as a service (PaaS) functions — including Lambda, step functions, and batch on AWS and logic apps and functions on Azure — gives organizations the capability to orchestrate workflows on the cloud. But, importantly, it also allows customers to integrate these cloud functions with applications running in private clouds and hybrid architectures, the company says.

Source: BMC Touches Clouds with Job Scheduler

Link: Google’s new cloud chief has a culture clash ahead of him after 22 years at Oracle

But when it comes to the big storage and core computing contracts, numerous industry experts, venture capitalists and tech executives alike told CNBC that Google’s sales team is ineffective, preferring to sell what it thinks is best rather than what customers say they need.

“You don’t get paid to be right, you get paid to sell what the customer wants to buy,” said Mackey Craven, a partner at venture firm OpenView Venture Partners in Boston who focuses on enterprise start-ups.
Original source: Google’s new cloud chief has a culture clash ahead of him after 22 years at Oracle

Link: On Salesforce’s acquisition of MuleSoft

“[H]aving a decent integration platform in its arsenal enables Salesforce to tell better stories about the seamlessness of its own application portfolio, even as this continues to expand through acquisition (which, note, was where Oracle was with its Fusion Middleware portfolio and strategy when it bought BEA). It also potentially helps Salesforce further develop its Einstein proposition, by making it easier to get access to corporate data from more systems in more locations…. However, just as was the case with BEA, many of MuleSoft’s customers made that investment precisely because it could demonstrate its ability to connect anything to anything without bias, and nurture customers’ own heterogeneous ‘application networks’. I hope Salesforce can take MuleSoft’s existing value proposition forward as it creates the Salesforce Integration Cloud.”
Original source: On Salesforce’s acquisition of MuleSoft

Link: On Salesforce’s acquisition of MuleSoft

“[H]aving a decent integration platform in its arsenal enables Salesforce to tell better stories about the seamlessness of its own application portfolio, even as this continues to expand through acquisition (which, note, was where Oracle was with its Fusion Middleware portfolio and strategy when it bought BEA). It also potentially helps Salesforce further develop its Einstein proposition, by making it easier to get access to corporate data from more systems in more locations…. However, just as was the case with BEA, many of MuleSoft’s customers made that investment precisely because it could demonstrate its ability to connect anything to anything without bias, and nurture customers’ own heterogeneous ‘application networks’. I hope Salesforce can take MuleSoft’s existing value proposition forward as it creates the Salesforce Integration Cloud.”
Original source: On Salesforce’s acquisition of MuleSoft

Thoma Bravo Acquires Austin-Based, privately held Planview, PPM and Enterprise Architecture Tools

Passed from one PE firm to another: from Insight Venture Partners to Thoma Bravo. Sort of, one piece of coverage says “Insight Venture Partners will maintain its original 2014 capital investment in company.”

Carl Lehmann (he’s popped up a lot recently here!) and Liam Rogers at 451 have some numbers estimates:

Thoma Bravo’s acquisition of Planview comes three years after Insight Venture Partners acquired the WRM software company for an estimated $150m. The latest acquisition comes well above that – we estimate the deal size to be $800m. The multiple paid for the business is also substantially higher than the last purchase of Planview, which generated $175m in revenue in 2016. Insight will maintain an equity stake in the company, and Thoma Bravo becomes the new majority owner.

The rest of the excellent (as always) deal write-up also reminds me that Planview bought Troux back in 2015, consolidating this space a bit…albeit a pretty small market.

In addition to the Silicon Hills piece, see the official press release.

Link

Dealing with “disposable software” for enterprises

With consumer SaaSes and mobile apps coming and going, I’ve been thinking of the idea of “disposable software”: apps that last a year or so, but aren’t guaranteed to last longer. In the consumer space, there’s rarely been a guarantee that free software will last – that’s part of the “price” you pay for free.

This mentality is getting into business software more and more, however, and I don’t think “enterprises” are prepared for it. Part of the premium you pay for enterprise software should include the guarantee that it will have a longer life-cycle, but it’s worth asking if it does.

Also, it’s good for enterprises to be aware of vendors, particularly open source driven ones, are putting out code that might be “disposable.” The prevailing product management think nowadays encourages experimenting and trying things out: abandoning “failed” experiments and continuing successful ones. Clearly, if you’re a “normal” enterprise, you want to avoid those failed experiments and, at best, properly control and govern your use of them.

Of course, there are trade-offs:

  • With consumer, experiment-driven software, you’re always getting the newest thinking, which might turn out to be a good idea and provide your business with differentiating, “secret sauce”; or it might be a failed experiment that gets canceled
  • With “enterprise,” stable software you can generally count on it existing and being supported next year; but you’ll often be behind the curve on innovation, meaning you’ll have to layer on the “secret sauce” on your own.

It’s good to engage with both types of strategies, you just have manage the approach to hedge the risks of each.