Link: Why are large companies so difficult to rescue (regarding bad internal technology)

In terms of the best integration architecture, what seems to me the only long-term solution is something like the unified log architecture that Jay Kreps wrote about back in 2013. All incoming writes need to go into a centralized log, such as Kafka, and then from there the various databases can pull what they need, with each team making its own decisions about what it needs from that central log. However, SuperRentalCorp has retail outlets with POS (point of sale) systems which talk directly to specific databases, and the path of that write (straight from the POS to the database) is hardcoded in ways that will be difficult to change, so it will be a few years before the company can have a single write-point. For now, each database team needs to be accepting writes from multiple sources. But a unified log is the way to go in the long-term. And that represents a large change of process for every one of those 20 teams. Which helps explain why the company has spent 2 years and $25 million trying to build an API, and so far they have failed.

Source: Why are large companies so difficult to rescue (regarding bad internal technology)

Link: Toxic Technology: the growing legacy threat

“The UK Government Digital Service recently wrote about how they understand legacy and suggested a number of factors that contribute to technology being considered legacy: being poorly supported, hard to update, poorly documented, non-compliant or inefficient. The range of breadth of these negative characteristics runs counter to an often passive view of legacy: stable historic technology that is intended to be replaced. Organisations should begin to think of this technology as toxic: actively harmful to the health of the organisation.”
Original source: Toxic Technology: the growing legacy threat

Link: CIOs Must Use EAs To Be Successful In Their Digital Transformations

“Developing a portfolio of architecture products to articulate the firm’s enterprise architecture. DevOps and business product managers have become very skilled in product management. However, it has been difficult to link business and technology products in a meaningful way. EAs have productized architectural components — customer journeys, value streams, and life cycles — as a tool to bridge this gap and align business products, architectural products, and technology products to strategy.”
Original source: CIOs Must Use EAs To Be Successful In Their Digital Transformations

Thoma Bravo Acquires Austin-Based, privately held Planview, PPM and Enterprise Architecture Tools

Passed from one PE firm to another: from Insight Venture Partners to Thoma Bravo. Sort of, one piece of coverage says “Insight Venture Partners will maintain its original 2014 capital investment in company.”

Carl Lehmann (he’s popped up a lot recently here!) and Liam Rogers at 451 have some numbers estimates:

Thoma Bravo’s acquisition of Planview comes three years after Insight Venture Partners acquired the WRM software company for an estimated $150m. The latest acquisition comes well above that – we estimate the deal size to be $800m. The multiple paid for the business is also substantially higher than the last purchase of Planview, which generated $175m in revenue in 2016. Insight will maintain an equity stake in the company, and Thoma Bravo becomes the new majority owner.

The rest of the excellent (as always) deal write-up also reminds me that Planview bought Troux back in 2015, consolidating this space a bit…albeit a pretty small market.

In addition to the Silicon Hills piece, see the official press release.

Link