Enterprise architecture still matters

This post is an early draft of a chapter in my book,  Monolithic Transformation.

A typical enterprise CAB.

We had assumed that alignment would occur naturally because teams would view things from an enterprise-wide perspective rather than solely through the lens of their own team. But we’ve learned that this only happens in a mature organization, which we’re still in the process of becoming. — Ron van Kemenade, ING.

The enterprise architect’s role in all of this deserves some special attention. Traditionally, in most large organizations, enterprise architects define the governance and shared technologies. They also enforce these practices, often through approval processes and review boards. An enterprise architect (EA) is seldom held in high regard by developers in traditional organizations. Teams (too) often see EAs as “enterprise astronauts,” behind on current technology and methodology, meddling too much in day-to-day decisions, sucking up time with change-advisory boards (CABs), and forever working on work that’s irrelevant to “the real work” done in product teams.

It’s popular, even, for the DevOps community to poke fun at them, going so far as to show that the traditional, change advisory board methods of governance actually damage the organization. “Using external change approval processes such as a change advisory board, as opposed to peer-based code review techniques,” Jez Humble writes summarizing the 2014 DevOps Report, “significantly impacts throughput while doing almost nothing to improve stability.”

If cruel, this sentiment often has truth to it. “If I’m doing 8 or 15 releases a week,” HCSC’s Mark Ardito says, “how am I going to get through all those CABs?” While traditional EAs may do “almost nothing” of value for high performing organizations, the role does play a significant part in cloud native leadership.

First, and foremost, EAs are part of leadership, acting something like the engineer to the product manager on the leadership team. An EA should intimately know the current and historic state of the IT department, and also should have a firm grasp on the actual business IT supports.

While EAs are made fun of for ever defining their enterprise architecture diagrams, that work is a side-effect of meticulously keeping up with the various applications, services, systems and dependencies in the organization. Keeping those diagrams up-to-date is a hopeless task, but the EAs who make them at least have some knowledge of your existing spaghetti of interdependent systems. As you clean-up this bowl of noodles, EAs will have more insights into the overall system. Indeed, tidying up that wreckage is an under appreciate task.

The EA’s dirty hands

I like to think of the work EAs do as gardening the overall organization. This contrasts with the more tops-down idea of defining and governing the organization, down to technologies and frameworks used by each team. Let’s look at some an EAs gardening tasks.

Setting technology & methodology defaults

Even if you take an extreme, developer friendly position, saying that you’re not going to govern what’s inside each application, there are still numerous points of governance about how the application is packaged, deployed, how it interfaces and integrates with other applications and services, how it should be instrumented to be managed, and so on. In large organizations, EAs should play a large role in setting these “defaults.” There may be reasons to deviate, but they’re the prescribed starting points.

As Stuart Charlton explains:

I think that it’s important that as you’re doing this you do have to have some standards about providing a tap, or an interface, or something to be able to hook anything you’re building into a broader analytics ecosystem called a data-lake — or whatever you want to call it — that at least allows me to get at your data. It’s not you know, like “hey I wrote this thing using a gRPC and golang and you can’t get at my data!” No you got to have something where people can get at it, at the very least.

Beyond software, EAs can also set the defaults for the organization’s meatware, all the process, methodology, and other “code” that actual people execute. Before Home Depot started standardizing their process, Tony McCully says, “everyone was trying to be agile and there was this very disjointed fragmented sort of approach to it You know I joke that we know we had 40 scrum teams and we were doing it 25 different ways.” Clearly, this is not ideal, and standardizing how your product teams operate is better.

It may seem constricting at first, but setting good defaults leads to good outcomes like Allstate reporting going from 20% developer productivity to over 80%. As someone once quipped: they’re called “best practices” because they are the best practices.

Gardening product teams

First, someone has to define all the applications and services that all those product teams form around. At a small scale, the teams themselves can do this, but as you scale up to 1,000’s of people and 100’s of teams, gathering together a Star Wars scale Galactic Senate is folly. EAs are well suited to define the teams, often using domain-driven design (DDD) to first find and then form the “domains” that define each team. A DDD analysis can turn quickly into its own crazy wall of boxes and arrows, of course. Hopefully, EAs can keep the lines as helpfully straight as possible.

It’s always spaghetti.

Rather than checking in on how each team is operating, EAs should generally focus on the outcomes these teams have. Following the rule of team autonomy (described elsewhere in this booklet), EAs should regularly check on each team’s outcomes to determine any modifications needed to the team structures. If things are going well, whatever’s going on inside that black box must be working. Otherwise, the team might need help, or you might need to create new teams to keep the focus small enough to be effective.

Gardening microservices

Most cloud native architectures use microservices, hopefully, to safely remove dependencies that can deadlock each team’s progress as they wait for a service to update. At scale, it’s worth defining how microservices work as well, for example: are they event based, how is data passed between different services, how should service failure be handled, and how are services versioned?

@pczarkowski asks, “do you even microservice?”

Again, a senate of product teams can work at a small scale, but not on the galactic scale. EAs clearly have a role in establishing the guidance for how microservices are done and what type of policy is followed. As ever, this policy shouldn’t be a straight-jacket. The era of SOA and ESBs has left the industry suspicious of EAs defining services. Those systems became cumbersome and slow moving, not to mention expensive in both time and software licensing. We’ll see if microservices avoid that fate, but keeping the overall system light-weight and nimble is clearly a gardening that EAs are well suited for.

Platform operations

As we’ll discuss later, at the center of every cloud native organization is a platform. This platform standardizes and centralizes the runtime environment, how software is packaged and deployed, how it’s managed in production, and otherwise removes all the toil and sloppiness from traditional, bespoke enterprise application stacks. Most of the platform cases studies I’ve been using, for example, are from organizations using Pivotal Cloud Foundry.

Occasionally, EAs become the product managers for these platforms. The platform embodies the organization’s actual enterprise architecture and evolving the platform, thus, evolves the architecture. Just as each product team orients their weekly software releases around helping their customers and users, the platform operations team runs the platform as a product.

EAs might also get involved with the tools groups that provide the build pipeline and other shared services and tools. Again, these tools embody part of the overall enterprise architecture, more of the running cogs behind all those boxes and arrows.

As a side-effect of product managing the platform and tools, EAs can establish and enforce governance. The packaging, integration, runtime, and other “opinions” expressed in the platform can be crafted to force policy compliance. That’s a command-and-control way of putting it, and you certainly don’t want your platform to be restrictive. Instead, by implementing the best possible service or tool, you’re getting product teams to follow policy and best practices by bribing them with easy of use and toil-reduction.

It’s the same as always

I’ve highlighted just three areas EA contribute to in a cloud native organization. There are more, many of which will depend on the peccadilloes of your organization, for example:

  • Identifying and solving sticky cultural change issues is one such, situational topic. EAs will often know individual’s histories and motivations, giving them insights into how to deal with grumps that want to stall change.
  • EA groups are well positioned to track, test, and recommend new technologies and methodologies. This can become an “enterprise astronaut” task of being too far afield of actual needs and not understanding what teams need day-to-day, of course. But, coupled with being a product manager for the organizations’ platform, scouting out new technologies can be grounded in reality.
  • EAs are well positioned to negotiate with external stakeholders and blockers. For example, as covered later, auditors often end-up liking the new, small batch and platform-driven approach to software because it affords more control and consistency. Someone has to work with the auditors to demonstrate this and be prepared to attend endless meetings that product team members are ill-suited and ill-tempered for.

What I’ve found is that EAs do what they’ve always done. But, as with other roles, EAs are now equipped with better process and technology to do their jobs. They don’t have to be forever struggling eyes in the sky and can actually get to the job of architecting, refactoring, and programming the enterprise architecture. Done well, this architecture becomes a key asset for the organization, often the key asset of IT.

Though he poses it in terms of the CIO’s responsibility, Mark Schwartz describes the goals of enterprise architects well:

The CIO is the enterprise architect and arbitrates the quality of the IT systems in the sense that they promote agility in the future. The systems could be filled with technical debt but, at any given moment, the sum of all the IT systems is an asset and has value in what it enables the company to do in the future. The value is not just in the architecture but also in the people and the processes. It’s an intangible asset that determines the company’s future revenues and costs and the CIO is responsible for ensuring the performance of that asset in the future.

Hopefully the idea of architecting and then actually creating and gardening that enterprise asset is attractive to EAs. In most cases, it is. Like all technical people, they pine for the days when they actually wrote software. Now’s their chance to get back to it.

Check out the video version of this:

This post is an early draft of a chapter in my book,  Monolithic Transformation.

The role of enterprise architects in cloud-native organizations

My colleague Richard has a nice post suggesting the new functions enterprise architects can play in a cloud-native organization. I like this one in particular, help make the change:

Champion new team organization patterns. As an architect, you can bring developers and operations teams together. Recognize that functional silos slow down delivery. A DevOps-type approach really works. Architects are perfectly positioned to pioneer new team structures that increase velocity and customer attentiveness.

It’s brief, but there’s plenty of other good chunks of advice in there.

Source: How to Remaster Enterprise Architecture for a Cloud-Native World