🗂 Link: A spot of after-hours business email does you good, apparently

Published in the Computers in Human Behaviour academic journal, the study enumerates no fewer than 72 actions that people apparently take while managing their work emails. We can count five – delete, mark as spam, forward, reply and read but ignore – and can only imagine that reaching the figure of 72 must include crying and rocking in the corner of the office while reading the full contents of one’s inbox.

Source: A spot of after-hours business email does you good, apparently

Link: Google makes emails more dynamic with AMP for Email

With AMP for Email, those messages become interactive. That means you’ll be able to RSVP to an event right from the message, fill out a questionnaire, browse through a store’s inventory or respond to a comment — all without leaving your web-based email client.

Some of the companies that already support this new format are Booking.com, Despegar, Doodle, Ecwid, Freshworks, Nexxt, OYO Rooms, Pinterest and redBus. If you regularly get emails from these companies, then chances are you’ll receive an interactive email from them in the coming weeks.

Source: Google makes emails more dynamic with AMP for Email

Link: Gartner: Cloud Email Adoption Still in Early Stages

“The cloud email market is still in the early stages of adoption, Gartner said, with 13 percent of identified publicly listed companies globally using one of the two main cloud email vendors, Microsoft Office 365 or Google Apps for Work, respectively. With the majority of companies opting for smaller vendors, the cloud email opportunity is still ripe for channel partners… According to Gartner, 8.5 percent of public companies in its sample of nearly 40,000 public companies globally use Microsoft’s Office 365 service, while 4.7 percent use Google Apps for Work.”

Seems pretty crazy, but I’m sure there’s sunk costs, security and data handling issues, and, well, sometimes it probably is cheaper.

Source: Gartner: Cloud Email Adoption Still in Early Stages

Outlook is a good, mobile email client

And, when I actually think about what is going on, I’m using Microsoft Outlook on my Apple iPhone to read my Google Gmail.

I’ve used it since back when it was Acompli. It’s good stuff! I’m looking forward to the desktop Outlook working well in OS X (I run the preview and last I checked it didn’t work with GMail, need to check again). What a world!

Outlook is a good, mobile email client

The phone sucks

But despite 53% of those polled in the Sennheister study saying they wished everyone picked up the phone more rather than clogging up inboxes with wasted emails, many are reluctant to go retro and pick up the phone- 67% of workers said they send more emails than they make phone calls because it’s easier, and one in five confessed they were not confident about speaking on the phone. So are there better ways of keeping everyone in the loop about mundane things such as fire drills, whip rounds, new starters and lottery syndicates?

I always feel like people just need to learn how to communicate in the written word better. Often, there’s no conventions explicitly stated about how to use email. I don’t think I’ve ever started a job that had “here’s how we use email around here” training. If you have no shared process – and training to get everyone using the process – of course it sucks, no matter what “it” is.

The phone sucks

The email iron grip

First, Microsoft and other vendors like IBM still have a tight grip on the largest companies. Gartner analyst Tom Eid—who predicts that enterprise email alone will be a $5 billion global industry this year, growing about 10% from last year—confirms this. He estimates that Microsoft still commands 75% of the market’s spending, versus about 3% to 5% for Google.

I like that specificity of “spending.”

The email iron grip

My other issue is managing my time. Whole weeks – months? – seem to go by where all I’ve done is barely kept up on email.

Me, in some correspondence with Robert Brook.

The question mark of doom

[T]he most feared emails within Amazon are forwarded customer complaints from Bezos accompanied by a single character: a question mark.

Man, from all the stories I hear, I don’t think of fare well at Amazon. That written essay vs PowerPoint sounds cool, though.

The question mark of doom

India Wants To Ban US-Based Email Systems For Government Communications Over NSA Concerns

In a statement to reporters here J. Satyanarayana, secretary in the department of electronics and information technology, said that data of Indian citizens using US based email services like Gmail is residing on servers which are located outside India and for now the government is concerned about the large amount of official and critical data that may be resident on those servers.

India Wants To Ban US-Based Email Systems For Government Communications Over NSA Concerns

Two very different estimates of cloud email usage and forecasts

A while back I posted a quick quote from recent Gartner prognosticating about cloud email. The up-shot was that right now, it’s just about 8% for all types of companies, globally (except India and China for some reason). Someone from SpiceWorks left a comment that arecent survey of theirs indicated something much different, at least across the more SMB focused demographics they asked (out of 539 respondents, 46% were in companies of 10-99 employees, 23% were from companies of 100-249). Gartner, no doubt, covers a broader market, perhaps even weighted to larger companies (I don’t have access to the report, so I can’t look up the demographics).

For your entertainment, here are the two charts:

Email Moving to Cloud Estimates

Email Moving to Cloud Estimates

(The SpiceWorks 2014 estimate is a bit of fuzz-work on my part based on people’s claims to migrate in six months. If that bothers you, just assume it’s flat and the fun still stands.)

People stuck in the email backwoods

Only 8% of office system users employ cloud-hosted email and desktop applications, according to analyst company Gartner
Gartner expects that 10% of enterprise email inboxes will be hosted in the cloud by the end of 2014.
…adoption will accelerate from the first half to 2015, reaching 33% penetartiong in 2017 and 60% by 2022

Just 8% of workers use cloud for office apps

These figures – which I pretty much believe – always baffle me. Running your own email has got to be one the least valuable, more annoying services you can do. It also causes all sorts of BYOD hassles. The more important part is catching up to the consumertech grade quality of cloud email, and being able to integrate into the application and services ecosystems users of services like GMail have access to. Otherwise, you’re stuck on the on-premises backwoods of Exchange and Outlook – an email approach that equally baffles me when it comes to productivity, e.g., tiny quotas, desktop syncing, and the lack of "basics" like archiving and useful search.

The pushback I get is always around security and the usual stick in the mud stuff.