Link: High churn rate in the S&P 500

Innosight’s third study of company’s ability to maintain leadership positions estimates that by 2018, 50% of the companies on the S&P 500 will drop off, replaced by competitors and new market entrants. Staying at the top of your market-heap is getting harder and harder.

This is often used to show how difficult the business world is now. It’s hard enough to get to the top, and hard to stay there.
Original source: High churn rate in the S&P 500

Link: High churn rate in the S&P 500

Innosight’s third study of company’s ability to maintain leadership positions estimates that by 2018, 50% of the companies on the S&P 500 will drop off, replaced by competitors and new market entrants. Staying at the top of your market-heap is getting harder and harder.

This is often used to show how difficult the business world is now. It’s hard enough to get to the top, and hard to stay there.
Original source: High churn rate in the S&P 500

Link: Agile processes can transform companies from unexpected places: The VGZ success story

At the topic of agile, lean, DevOps, and all that “digital transformation” stuff is a renewed focus on customers and figuring out what they want to give you money for, then making the product as good as possible for them:

VGZ decided to focus its efforts on improving the customer experience. The starting point was not a traditional customer segmentation — the leadership instead decided to focus on understanding and improving customer journeys, specifically the frequency of customer interactions and the impact on the life of customers.

Very “jobs to be done.”
Original source: Agile processes can transform companies from unexpected places: The VGZ success story

Link: Why Starting With End-to-End Customer Journeys Isn’t Good For The Customer

‘Here’s how to make the argument to a stakeholder on your team that really wants to see that end-to-end vision: If the idea is to get value out to customers as fast as possible, does it make sense to explore every customer touch point? The time spent doing that intensive research could’ve been spent building and delivering an MVP for customers and get them excited about. Repeating this cycle gets the team to “learn by doing” and is actually a faster way to truly understand the customer’s end-to-end journey. It’s also a lot more engaging work than research and makes the team stronger.’
Original source: Why Starting With End-to-End Customer Journeys Isn’t Good For The Customer

Link: Project management vs. product management

‘That discussion starts with a very concise and useful distinction between project management (the world the government knows) and product management (the world it doesn’t). Project management, they write, is “focused on managing to a plan” — such as managing schedule, budget, risk, policy compliance and then reporting status to stakeholders. “Success for a project manager is delivering a defined scope of work on-time and on-budget,” Johnston and O’Connor note. Product management, meanwhile, “is focused on delivering a product a user wants or needs.” Success for a product manager “is delivering a product that users love — and use to complete tasks (or in the private sector — a product customers will pay for).”’
Original source: Project management vs. product management