Link: Volkswagen CIO Martin Hofmann: IT experts in our labs work the Silicon Valley way – Automotive World

‘Hofmann commented that at the same time Volkswagen was establishing new workstyles which are being further developed. “Our IT experts in our labs in Berlin and Munich work the Silicon Valley way, we have brought the Valley to Volkswagen. Pivotal is supporting our experts with over 20 experts from San Francisco and Boulder, Colorado, and is training them in new software development methods. Our aim is to firmly anchor these skills and workstyles in the Group and in Germany. In the medium term, there will be more than 600 programmers, data scientists, design thinking experts and cloud architects working in our labs in Berlin, Munich and San Francisco”, Hofmann said.’
Original source: Volkswagen CIO Martin Hofmann: IT experts in our labs work the Silicon Valley way – Automotive World

Link: The End of Enterprise IT, ING org. structure

“They chose to adopt an organizational structure in which small teams – ING calls them squads – accept end-to-end responsibility for a consumer-focused mission. Squads are expected to make their own decisions based on a shared purpose, the insight of their members, and rapid feedback from their work. Squads are grouped into tribes of perhaps 150 people that share a value stream (e.g. mortgages), and within each tribe, chapter leads provide functional leadership. Along with the new organizational structure, ING’s leadership team worked to create a culture that values technical excellence, experimentation, and customer-centricity.”
Original source: The End of Enterprise IT, ING org. structure

Link: Making public policy in the digital age – digital HKS

When you can put our releases weekly, how do you channel the feedback to government policy and laws? We’re used to policy being static, and slow. But with a small batch approach, you could experiment and change policy, just like you can the software.

It’ll likely be a long, long time before that happens, but it’d be a lot cooler if it did.
Original source: Making public policy in the digital age – digital HKS

Link: Digital is a long-term objective, CEOs warned

“If you remember the shift from WAP banking to app banking – this took eight years, and it was a relatively superficial change. But a deeper change to the product and services of your business can take 10 or more year – some will even take 15 years. The risk for business leaders is that some people believe you can do it in three years.”
Original source: Digital is a long-term objective, CEOs warned

Link: Domino’s CEO’s parting shot – we’re going to be 100% digital

‘If you figure today we are north of 60% on our digital orders and about 10% of our orders are walk-in orders -people just walking into the store and somebody takes the order there – and those can be handled with kiosks, so that’s how those are going to be digital. But you’re looking at, today, 25% or maybe slightly more that are still old-fashioned phone orders. And think maybe three minutes average on the phone for somebody to take a phone order.’
Original source: Domino’s CEO’s parting shot – we’re going to be 100% digital

Link: The Sorry State of Digital Transformation in 2018

Organizations talk a lot about transformation, but their actions don’t always back it up:

“To find out the state of digital transformation, we surveyed 1,600 business and IT decision-makers in North American and European enterprises. The answer? Sorry, I’m afraid. As you can see from the picture below, 21% of firms think their transformation is dusted and done. Really? Done? And another 22% are investigating or not transforming at all. And while 56% of firms are transforming, their level of investment and scope of transformation are still mostly small. For example, only 34% of banks and insurers are even bothering to transform marketing and only 45% are transforming customer care — a too-small percentage given consumers’ of mass adoption of mobile devices.

“Why? As one respondent put it, “It’s a war between old-school technophobe leaders and the technology innovation that represents a completely different way of doing business.”
Original source: The Sorry State of Digital Transformation in 2018

Link: How Insurance Giant Allstate Is Using Cloud Tech to Build New Businesses

“When you’re an 86-year-old company things have done a certain way, there are rules in place because of what someone did 10 years ago,” says Opal Perry, vice president and divisional chief information officer of claims for Allstate. “Now, instead of a 200-person team, you have small six- and eight-person teams working on things. It unleashes creativity.”

In the past, many enterprise software projects required millions of dollars, and even sign-off by the CEO. “By the time you got permission, ideas died,” explains Perry. “Now a senior manager has $50,000 or $100,000 to do a minimum viable product.”
Original source: How Insurance Giant Allstate Is Using Cloud Tech to Build New Businesses