Link: The New CIO: Leading IT the Mark Schwartz Way

“As the company decides on its objectives and turns them into a definition of business value, the CIO takes this vision and works with the teams to implement these objectives thereby connecting the team to the goal and giving constant feedback on progress. The CIO is the enterprise architect and arbitrates the quality of the IT systems in the sense that they promote agility in the future. The systems could be filled with technical debt but, at any given moment, the sum of all the IT systems is an asset and has value in what it enables the company to do in the future. The value is not just in the architecture but also in the people and the processes. It’s an intangible asset that determines the company’s future revenues and costs and the CIO is responsible for ensuring the performance of that asset in the future.”
Original source: The New CIO: Leading IT the Mark Schwartz Way

Link: What Your Innovation Process Should Look Like

“Once a list of innovation ideas has been refined by curation, it needs to be prioritized. One of the quickest ways to sort innovation ideas is to use the McKinsey Three Horizons Model. Horizon 1 ideas provide continuous innovation to a company’s existing business model and core capabilities. Horizon 2 ideas extend a company’s existing business model and core capabilities to new customers, markets or targets. Horizon 3 is the creation of new capabilities to take advantage of or respond to disruptive opportunities or disruption. We’d add a new category, Horizon 0, which refers to graveyards ideas that are not viable or feasible.”
Original source: What Your Innovation Process Should Look Like

Link: How to make innovation programs deliver more than coffee cups

‘“a lack of connection between innovation teams and their parent organization. Teams form/and are taught outside of their parent organization because innovation is disconnected from other activities. This meant that when teams went back to their home organization, they found that execution of existing priorities took precedence. They returned speaking a foreign language (What’s a pivot? Minimum viable what?) to their colleagues and bosses who are rewarded on execution-based metrics. Further, as budgets are planned out years in advance, their organization had no slack for “good ideas.” As a result, there was no way to finish and deploy whatever innovative prototypes the innovators had developed – even ones that have been validated.”’
Original source: How to make innovation programs deliver more than coffee cups

Link: Revenge of the PMO

‘But it’s just a marketing strategy. Mostly they just redefine the meaning of these terms to obscure their purposes. An Epic becomes a “mini business case;” the concept of governance sounds less onerous when called “lean governance;” and program management might cause less angst when positioned as “agile program management.” The constant talk of iterations and agile obscures the reality that these “Agile Release Trains” are mostly happening every 10 weeks.’
Original source: Revenge of the PMO

Link: The Travel Industry’s Data Dilemma: Turning Insights into Action

“Further complicating matters, a large amount of customer data still lives in departmental silos, with sales, marketing, and customer service each supplying separate customer experiences. Those databases can easily grow stale or become inconsistent, since customer information owned by one department is often not shared with others. Keeping it up to date is an even more formidable task –– even a monthly update isn’t always frequent enough to keep up with the important life changes that can impact marketing decisions.”
Original source: The Travel Industry’s Data Dilemma: Turning Insights into Action