Link: Enterprises to spend almost $2 trillion on digital transformation by 2022

“Industry spending on DX technologies is being driven by core innovation accelerator technologies with IoT and cognitive computing leading the race in terms of overall spend,” said Eileen Smith, program director with IDC’s Customer Insights and Analysis Group. “The introduction of IoT sensors and communications capabilities is rapidly transforming manufacturing processes as well as asset and inventory management across a wide range of industries. Similarly, artificial intelligence and machine learning are dramatically changing the way businesses interact with data and enabling fundamental changes in business processes.”

Some 75 percent of the total digital transformation spend will go to hardware and services. Chinese and U.S. companies together will account for more than half the overall spend.

What? No blockchain?
Original source: Enterprises to spend almost $2 trillion on digital transformation by 2022

Link: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Signaling change with symbolic acts that embody the new culture is a good way to activate leadership characteristics quickly. For example, companies can designate meeting-free days to emphasize greater focus on action over planning, or they can give engineers a cash allowance to buy their own desktop equipment to demonstrate trust. Sometimes even a bold move, such as firing people whose behavior is antithetical to the new culture, is warranted. To signal change at Cisco, executives in certain divisions gave up their offices so the company could create team rooms; the company also started allowing employees to choose the workspace and tech tools that best fit their individual roles. The CEO of the North American software provider cited earlier began sending notes to employees who are praised by name in customer reviews. Such acknowledgment serves as an example of how company leaders can reinforce the customer-first mindset that’s central to the company culture. 

And more leadership tactics from BCG.
Original source: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Link: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Signaling change with symbolic acts that embody the new culture is a good way to activate leadership characteristics quickly. For example, companies can designate meeting-free days to emphasize greater focus on action over planning, or they can give engineers a cash allowance to buy their own desktop equipment to demonstrate trust. Sometimes even a bold move, such as firing people whose behavior is antithetical to the new culture, is warranted. To signal change at Cisco, executives in certain divisions gave up their offices so the company could create team rooms; the company also started allowing employees to choose the workspace and tech tools that best fit their individual roles. The CEO of the North American software provider cited earlier began sending notes to employees who are praised by name in customer reviews. Such acknowledgment serves as an example of how company leaders can reinforce the customer-first mindset that’s central to the company culture. 

And more leadership tactics from BCG.
Original source: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Link: The State of Agile Software in 2018

The third thing that I want to stress is the importance of getting rid of software projects as a notion. Instead we want to switch to a product-oriented view of the world where instead of projects that you spin up, run for a while and then stop; you instead say, “Let’s focus on things that are much more long-lasting and organize a product team around that.” Another way of thinking about it is: what are the business capabilities that your organization has, and then organize the teams around those. These business capabilities will be long-lasting and will necessarily mean combining together technical people and the people who are on the business side of things into the same team.
Original source: The State of Agile Software in 2018

Link: Cyber Airmen fuel innovation

Any problems discovered in the software can be more easily corrected, a small failure being preferable to correcting the shortfalls of an entire software suite. Changes requested by the customer can sometimes be delivered in just a couple days.

Prior to Jigsaw, the tanker mission planners would use whiteboards to plot out their fueling rendezvous.

“Rather than taking hours to run the calculations by hand for the hundreds of sorties scheduled each day to find a feasible plan,” Tatro said. “The program logs events in order to detect and report errors in scheduling.”

It didn’t take long for the new software to start paying off.

“Before Jigsaw was delivered to the tanker planners, they would be spending 8 to 12 hours a day with a team of five planning a day of tanker missions,” Maung said. “Now they only need three people and it takes them 4 to 5 hours, usually done before lunch.”

Since the program was put into use in April 2017, Jigsaw has saved approximately $200,000 per day, just in fuel. There were other benefits as well.
Original source: Cyber Airmen fuel innovation

Link: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Culture is the most important factor, way more important than technology, for example. By culture, we mean a set of shared values and beliefs that drive a change in behaviors. This has to be both a top-down and a bottom-up approach. The CEO and the C-level executives must embody the culture and the DNA of the brand so that employees change their behaviors to better serve their clients. A great example of this was shared by Frédéric Oudéa, the CEO of Société Générale, when receiving the 2018 prize (see picture below): He regularly (once a month) spends time learning how to code in order to understand IT/software issues and directly listen to clients and employees. Another example comes from C-level executives at Generali or Air Liquide, which spend time regularly to call back detractors themselves.
Original source: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Link: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Culture is the most important factor, way more important than technology, for example. By culture, we mean a set of shared values and beliefs that drive a change in behaviors. This has to be both a top-down and a bottom-up approach. The CEO and the C-level executives must embody the culture and the DNA of the brand so that employees change their behaviors to better serve their clients. A great example of this was shared by Frédéric Oudéa, the CEO of Société Générale, when receiving the 2018 prize (see picture below): He regularly (once a month) spends time learning how to code in order to understand IT/software issues and directly listen to clients and employees. Another example comes from C-level executives at Generali or Air Liquide, which spend time regularly to call back detractors themselves.
Original source: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key