Three screens

Microsoft shot for consistency with Metro, putting the square interface on its tablets, phones and PCs under something it called three-screens and the cloud. Yet Microsoft was wrong to lump PC users in with device users, as it turned out neither customers nor developers wanted Metro on their PC – they hated it.

There is a notion that Metro was a failure there, which would be good to see the proof points in (low Window 8 uptake?). But, putting that footnoting aside as a distraction from interesting noodling, there’s a fun idea in there that we’ll see a lot in the coming years: do mobile devices need different UIs and UX than PCs, and Bice versa?

Three screens

Using user activity tracking data in application design

Gmail’s designers also saw that most people never use text-formatting options, such as bold and italic, when writing email, so they hid all those buttons under a single icon in the new window. In both cases, they used data to hone their designs to mesh with how people engage with the product.

That’s a new version of the “no one ever uses ‘advanced search’” line.

Using user activity tracking data in application design

Consumers aren’t rational

But IT business buyers are, he says, and don’t know how make speeds and feeds (the basis of their buying behavior, plus price) account for UX:

The business buyer, famously, does not care about the user experience. They are not the user, and so items that change how a product feels or that eliminate small annoyances simply don’t make it into their rational decision making process.

Consumers aren’t rational