🗂 Link: Silicon Valley software techniques modernize 75-year-old plant

Raytheon Systems Engineer Sam Sauers and her team spearheaded one of the latest DevOps transformations on the program, introducing Silicon Valley-like processes like paired programming and pipeline development to help the Air Soldier team rapidly develop the technology.

“We’re using commercial software best practices, including Agile and DevOps, to get new capabilities in days instead of years,” said Sauers. “We’ve also been implementing user-centered design: getting ahead of the users and figuring out the next thing they’re going to need. We then develop toward that rather than getting something out there and getting feedback that it wasn’t what they wanted.”

Source: Silicon Valley software techniques modernize 75-year-old plant

Link: How Booking.com A/B Tests Ten Novenonagintillion Versions of its Site

“According to research by Evercore Group L.L.C., Booking.com’s “testing drives conversions across the whole platform at 2–3 times the industry average.” That means massive increases to their revenue and bottom line.”

How Booking.com A/B Tests Ten Novenonagintillion Versions of its Site
https://blog.usejournal.com/how-booking-com-a-b-tests-ten-novenonagintillion-versions-of-its-site-25fc3a9e875b
via Instapaper

Source: How Booking.com A/B Tests Ten Novenonagintillion Versions of its Site

Link: Digital, Strategy and Design

Strategy involves determining the company’s intent. Strategy is expressed in an understanding of the environment, an expression of ambition, decisions regarding the allocation of resources and plan of execution. Strategy provides a perspective on where and how the company will win from the inside out.
Design entails understanding and expressing customer intent. Expressed in terms of persona’s, needs, journey maps, touchpoints and prototypes. Design provides a perspective on how and why customers win from the outside in.

Source: Digital, Strategy and Design

Product management in the enterprise

Inside this interview, there’s an excellent explanation of what product management means in an enterprise. By “enterprise,” I mean a company who’s product is not technology. That is, most every company and organization out there. To that end, there’s a great example of doing product management and design at a food services company: discovering the actual problem to solve to meet business needs, and solving it by experimenting with a small batch loop.

See also the original show notes.

Link: The Fast and Slow of Design

On the top layer there is rapid change. On the bottom, change happens at a glacial pace. It’s this combination of everything, from seconds at the top, to millennia at the bottom, that give resilience to the system.

And:

A key concept to this is that each layer has to respect the pace of another.

Source: The Fast and Slow of Design

Link: Why Digital Workplace Apps Are Not Producing Great Customer Experiences

16 percent of respondents rate their digital experience offering in the top 25 percent.
26 percent rated digital banking experiences as in the bottom half of digital experiences.
49 percent rated digital government experiences in the bottom half.
Original source: Why Digital Workplace Apps Are Not Producing Great Customer Experiences

Link: Agile processes can transform companies from unexpected places: The VGZ success story

At the topic of agile, lean, DevOps, and all that “digital transformation” stuff is a renewed focus on customers and figuring out what they want to give you money for, then making the product as good as possible for them:

VGZ decided to focus its efforts on improving the customer experience. The starting point was not a traditional customer segmentation — the leadership instead decided to focus on understanding and improving customer journeys, specifically the frequency of customer interactions and the impact on the life of customers.

Very “jobs to be done.”
Original source: Agile processes can transform companies from unexpected places: The VGZ success story

Link: Why Starting With End-to-End Customer Journeys Isn’t Good For The Customer

‘Here’s how to make the argument to a stakeholder on your team that really wants to see that end-to-end vision: If the idea is to get value out to customers as fast as possible, does it make sense to explore every customer touch point? The time spent doing that intensive research could’ve been spent building and delivering an MVP for customers and get them excited about. Repeating this cycle gets the team to “learn by doing” and is actually a faster way to truly understand the customer’s end-to-end journey. It’s also a lot more engaging work than research and makes the team stronger.’
Original source: Why Starting With End-to-End Customer Journeys Isn’t Good For The Customer

Link: Three imperatives for federal agencies to capitalize on digital transformation

Just getting some basic design-think in there would probably solve most problems: ‘Nine in 10 respondents believe their agency “needs to spend more time on improving the usability of technology, as opposed to the development of the technology itself.”’
Original source: Three imperatives for federal agencies to capitalize on digital transformation

Link: Project vs. product management, in government

Good discussion of doing product management instead of project management. Also, discussion of user metrics to track design and usability:

“Defining success metrics helps you focus on what’s important in your product and how well it solves the problems you’ve identified. Defining key steps the user must take is also important in order to shine a spotlight on where in the process users are failing. With this data, you can conduct further in-person research to understand why they are failing and devise an even better solution.”
Original source: Project vs. product management, in government

Link: Without a formal mandate

“In almost every case there are stakeholders who are moved by quantitative data (say the percentage of phone calls that could be avoided.) There are also other stakeholders who connect with qualitative human stories. The magic really happens when you offer both types of evidence. Telling the stories, and backing them up with data points for the cost or the impact of what is happening to people, this is evidence with impact. When you make it real for everyone, you can more effectively catalyze change.”

Also, a sort of case study of improving design in state government.
Original source: Without a formal mandate

Link: Without a formal mandate

“In almost every case there are stakeholders who are moved by quantitative data (say the percentage of phone calls that could be avoided.) There are also other stakeholders who connect with qualitative human stories. The magic really happens when you offer both types of evidence. Telling the stories, and backing them up with data points for the cost or the impact of what is happening to people, this is evidence with impact. When you make it real for everyone, you can more effectively catalyze change.”

Also, a sort of case study of improving design in state government.
Original source: Without a formal mandate

Link: Curing Handoff-itis

“I feel like it is just making our products so much better and so much more usable and user friendly. Having that integration with design rather than some sort of a hand-off, just means we get something into user’s hands quicker.”
Original source: Curing Handoff-itis

Link: Code Complexity is a Design Problem

‘A lot of my fellow designers get frustrated when engineering doesn’t want to build their solutions. Worse yet, they’ve handed off design “specs” and left engineering to fend for themselves, only to be surprised later by how poorly their designs translated into code.’

So, designers and developers should work more closely together.
Original source: Code Complexity is a Design Problem

Link: A New Study on Design Thinking is Great News for Designers

“Forrester has determined that teams that are applying IBM’s design thinking practice and are adequately staffed with design talent are getting to market twice as fast as without. These teams are also seeing up to a 75% reduction in design and development time.”
Original source: A New Study on Design Thinking is Great News for Designers