Link: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Signaling change with symbolic acts that embody the new culture is a good way to activate leadership characteristics quickly. For example, companies can designate meeting-free days to emphasize greater focus on action over planning, or they can give engineers a cash allowance to buy their own desktop equipment to demonstrate trust. Sometimes even a bold move, such as firing people whose behavior is antithetical to the new culture, is warranted. To signal change at Cisco, executives in certain divisions gave up their offices so the company could create team rooms; the company also started allowing employees to choose the workspace and tech tools that best fit their individual roles. The CEO of the North American software provider cited earlier began sending notes to employees who are praised by name in customer reviews. Such acknowledgment serves as an example of how company leaders can reinforce the customer-first mindset that’s central to the company culture. 

And more leadership tactics from BCG.
Original source: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Link: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Signaling change with symbolic acts that embody the new culture is a good way to activate leadership characteristics quickly. For example, companies can designate meeting-free days to emphasize greater focus on action over planning, or they can give engineers a cash allowance to buy their own desktop equipment to demonstrate trust. Sometimes even a bold move, such as firing people whose behavior is antithetical to the new culture, is warranted. To signal change at Cisco, executives in certain divisions gave up their offices so the company could create team rooms; the company also started allowing employees to choose the workspace and tech tools that best fit their individual roles. The CEO of the North American software provider cited earlier began sending notes to employees who are praised by name in customer reviews. Such acknowledgment serves as an example of how company leaders can reinforce the customer-first mindset that’s central to the company culture. 

And more leadership tactics from BCG.
Original source: It’s Not a Digital Transformation Without a Digital Culture

Link: When Culture Doesn’t Translate

Unfortunately, the Thai manager told me, his U.S. colleagues usually didn’t send the agenda until an hour before the call, so his team was unable to prepare. And it struggled to understand what was said during the call, because the U.S. participants spoke too quickly. He also said that the Americans rarely invited comments from the Thais, expecting them to jump into the conversation as they themselves would. But that kind of intervention is not the norm in Thailand, where it is much less common to speak if not invited or questioned. The Thai manager summed up his perspective this way: “They invite us to the meeting, but they don’t suggest with their actions that they care what we have to say.” The Thai team members ended up just sitting on the phone listening—giving the Americans the impression that they had nothing to contribute or weren’t interested in participating.
Original source: When Culture Doesn’t Translate

Link: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Culture is the most important factor, way more important than technology, for example. By culture, we mean a set of shared values and beliefs that drive a change in behaviors. This has to be both a top-down and a bottom-up approach. The CEO and the C-level executives must embody the culture and the DNA of the brand so that employees change their behaviors to better serve their clients. A great example of this was shared by Frédéric Oudéa, the CEO of Société Générale, when receiving the 2018 prize (see picture below): He regularly (once a month) spends time learning how to code in order to understand IT/software issues and directly listen to clients and employees. Another example comes from C-level executives at Generali or Air Liquide, which spend time regularly to call back detractors themselves.
Original source: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Link: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Culture is the most important factor, way more important than technology, for example. By culture, we mean a set of shared values and beliefs that drive a change in behaviors. This has to be both a top-down and a bottom-up approach. The CEO and the C-level executives must embody the culture and the DNA of the brand so that employees change their behaviors to better serve their clients. A great example of this was shared by Frédéric Oudéa, the CEO of Société Générale, when receiving the 2018 prize (see picture below): He regularly (once a month) spends time learning how to code in order to understand IT/software issues and directly listen to clients and employees. Another example comes from C-level executives at Generali or Air Liquide, which spend time regularly to call back detractors themselves.
Original source: Digital Transformation: Why Culture Is So Key

Link: Lessons from the UK Government’s Digital Transformation Journey

It’s probably OK:

In any organisation that’s been around for a while, ways of doing things build up and often disconnect from the reasons they were put in place. Things are cited as “rules” which are really just norms. We had to get really good at working out the difference, and on pushing back on some of those rules to get to the core principles.

Get involved with the backend people:

I know of one government project where the digital team couldn’t even add one extra textbox to their address fields, something users were complaining about, because the backend IT teams were too busy to make the change.

Working with the end user changes staff for the better:

I’ve talked to a lot of teams in large organisations who have taken all the right steps in moving to agile but are still having trouble motivating their teams, and the missing piece is almost always being exposed directly to your users. Whether they’re end customers, or internal users, there’s nothing like seeing people use your products to motivate the team to make them better.

Original source: Lessons from the UK Government’s Digital Transformation Journey

Link: Post-Authenticity and the Ironic Truths of Meme Culture

‘What is changing, I argue, are the cultural formats people are using for discussion — the carrier waves for this signal. This is where “authenticity” isn’t a useful claim any more, having been wholly co-opted and commodified into its opposite. Culture and the way we communicate — shaped by media affordances — have become more complex, ironic, and multi-layered than that.

‘It turns out, even people who share fake news stories are trying to tell a kind of truth too.’
Original source: Post-Authenticity and the Ironic Truths of Meme Culture

Link: Post-Authenticity and the Ironic Truths of Meme Culture

‘What is changing, I argue, are the cultural formats people are using for discussion — the carrier waves for this signal. This is where “authenticity” isn’t a useful claim any more, having been wholly co-opted and commodified into its opposite. Culture and the way we communicate — shaped by media affordances — have become more complex, ironic, and multi-layered than that.

‘It turns out, even people who share fake news stories are trying to tell a kind of truth too.’
Original source: Post-Authenticity and the Ironic Truths of Meme Culture

Link: Explaining the problems in The Last Jedi

“It is a movie about knowing what’s right and doing that, even though everything else in the universe is stacked against you. It is a movie about why you might start a rebellion against a fascistic order, rather than simply going along with the status quo. Part of the movie is about how the worst people in the universe aren’t even the First Order, but the rich profiteers who are happy to go along with whoever’s in power, so long as they keep making a few bucks…. The theme of The Last Jedi, then, is about being tested, about having everything you value thrown into question and figuring out for yourself the right thing to do. You can’t make the world perfectly safe for your metaphorical children. You will fail them, and they will fail you.”

Seemed like a good movie to me.
Link to original