The Requirements of Cloud Native – Interview on The New Stack

A little while ago I was on The New Stack Makers podcast with Alex Williams, talking cloud and Pivotal. Check it out:

Here’s what we go over:

In this podcast with Michael Coté, who works at Pivotal in technical marketing, he and The New Stack founder Alex Williams talk about current production systems and development environments for building applications. According to Coté, Pivotal describes these new systems and environments as “cloud native.”

Over the course of this interview, Coté discusses best practices and illustrates three requirements for cloud native development and deployment: utilizing the patterns of microservices architecture, implementing a DevOps approach, and striving for continuous delivery as the primary vehicle for software delivery.

Check it out!

The platform for keeping promises – a logical architecture for Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Check out my brief (~15 minutes) discussion with Alex Williams at The New Stack about how we’re thinking about the architecture of Pivotal Cloud Foundry. In addition to giving an overview of what Pivotal Cloud Foundry is and the cloud management and PaaS capabilities it has, I go over a way of thinking about the layered architecture (and why you’d care) that Andrew has been talking about recently.

There’s a longer version of this in my recent talk from Gartner ADDI as well.

Cloud Native Promises in the Land of Continuously Delivered Microservices – Gartner AADI 2015 Talk

I gave a talk at Gartner AADI, US going over the need for organizations to become good at software (you know, our usual thing at Pivotal) and some thinking we have about the three pillars of becoming a software defined business (software defined delivery, DevOps, and microservices) as well as the “contracts and promises” way of looking at what Pivotal Cloud Foundry does. I manage to jam it all into 30 minutes. Here’s the abstract:

If software is eating the world, software capability is the disruptor’s advantage and the disrupted’s vulnerability. Continuous Delivery, Microservices and DevOps are three labels that describe aspects of the same phenomena; the principles and practices of high performing organizations that deliver highly available software, rapidly, at scale. This presentation catalogs the capabilities that allow organizations to move quickly, reliably and economically in an end-to-end infrastructure-to-application platform; these Cloud Native advantages outlined as promises and contracts.

In addition to the slides, check out the video recording from Gartner, they’ve got them a fancy interface with the video and slides they gots!

Avoiding screwing up your cloud strategy: the greenfield journey

I’m doing a series of webinars based on my cloud native journey blog series, see the slides above (once the recording posts, I’ll embed it here as well!).

The gist of this series is my collection of advice on getting your cloud strategy right, mostly for large organizations. It starts with defining why you’d care (custom written software can now be used as a core competitive advantage, like never before), what the goals are (getting good at custom software development and delivery), and then gives advice across three different phases (greenfield, legacy, and organization transformation), or parts of the “maturity cycle” (a phrase I didn’t really use in the series).

Check out the first webinar on Nov. 5th at noon central, with two more coming in December, on the 1st and then the 15th.

Beyond the accidental platform

While I was up in Chicago, I was asked to give a talk at the Cloud Foundry meetup. Cedric volonteered out of the blue to record it, so there’s this lovely recording:

Here’s the abstract for the talk:

No matter what, you end up with a platform – the collection of tools, practices, and services you use end-to-end to develop, deploy, and run your application. Many people aren’t conscious of this fact and end up with an ‘accidental platform. All I’d like to accomplish with this talk is convince you that you should definitely be conscious of the platform you’re building and make sure it’s not just an accidental one.

Check out the slides as well if you’re interested.