Link: Containers and serverless functions – a modern architecture needs both and more

“While it’s unclear whether cost savings are the primary motivation for PaaS adoption, 62 percent of IT leaders (presumably a subset that omits developers and operations people) cite saving at least $100,000 by using PaaS instead of traditional development techniques.”

Also, summary of latest CFF survey and few other vendor sponsored surveys on PaaS, containers, and serverless.
Original source: Containers and serverless functions – a modern architecture needs both and more

Link: Will Containers Replace VMs?

“One of the most important benefits containers provide is that once you have a containerized application, it runs in exactly the same environment at every stage of the lifecycle, from initial development through testing and deployment, so you get mobility of a workload at every stage of its lifecycle,” said Iams. “In the past, you would develop an application and turn it over to production. Any environment they would be running it in would run into problems, so they’d kick it back to developers and you’d have to try to recreate the environment that it was running in. A lot of those issues go away once you containerize a workload.”
Original source: Will Containers Replace VMs?

Link: Press 1 for automagic K8s cluster. Press 2 or 3 for complex Kubernetes

“many developers want to adopt Kubernetes, but have little interest in provisioning the infrastructure, little skill at doing so optimally and no appetite to hire people to do either chore.”

Yeah. In other words: infrastructure software, a concise history.
Original source: Press 1 for automagic K8s cluster. Press 2 or 3 for complex Kubernetes

Link: IBM Drops Cloud Management Platform Onto Kubernetes

“The CMS platform is used by organizations to manage enterprise applications. Those applications include offerings from SAP and Oracle. CMS includes security, disaster recovery, automated infrastructure, and application management…. IBM launched its Cloud Private service last November. It’s built on a Kubernetes-based container architecture that supports integration and portability of workloads between the cloud environment and management across multiple clouds. This includes IBM Cloud, IBM PowerVC, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and VMware on and off premises.”

Original source: IBM Drops Cloud Management Platform Onto Kubernetes

Link: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

“What we’re seeing at companies like MetLife or Northern Trust is they’re taking their app and infrastructure management cost, and cutting it in half. Let’s say that you can cut 15 million dollars out of your app and infrastructure management cost, which by the way, some of our customers are at. That’s 50 million dollars you can go spend on innovation. That’s not going to the CEO and saying look, I need another hundred million dollars in my budget. That’s freeing up 50-100 million dollars of your existing budget.”

I assume that jump from $15m to $50m is a typo, or something.
Original source: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

Link: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform

“With the acquisition, Container Linux will be reborn as Red Hat CoreOS, a new entry into the Red Hat ecosystem. Red Hat CoreOS will be based on Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux sources and is expected to ultimately supersede Atomic Host as Red Hat’s immutable, container-centric operating system.

“Red Hat CoreOS will provide the foundation for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat OpenShift Online, and Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform will also, of course, continue to support Red Hat Enterprise Linux for those who prefer its lifecycle and packaging as the foundation for their Kubernetes deployments.

“Current Container Linux users can rest easy that Red Hat plans continue investing in the operating system and community. The project is an important base for container-based environments by delivering automated updates with strong security capabilities, and as a part of our commitment and vision we plan to support Container Linux as you know it today for the community and Tectonic users alike.”
Original source: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform

Link: Container orchestration top trumps: Let’s just pretend you don’t use Kubernetes already

Overview of container orchestration and platform options, brief.
Original source: Container orchestration top trumps: Let’s just pretend you don’t use Kubernetes already

Link: Why should Kubernetes be scared of AWS?

The scenario of AWS out-kubernetes kubernetes by layering another abstraction layer on-top of it to hide kubernetes from end-users “caring” about it: “In a not so distant future, users of container clusters will not care if they are using Kubernetes or under some AWS abstraction because it is the efficient way to do containers.”

Also, clever invocation or Xen as a historic analog.
Original source: Why should Kubernetes be scared of AWS?

Link: The Kubernetes Lesson

“In modern software development organizations, however, what gets used in development and testing environments has a habit of showing up in production. This was the opportunity that Kubernetes was built to take advantage of. It provided developers with a means – an open source means, naturally – of taking the containers they were so enamored of and running them in production environments, but without having to make determinations such as which containers run on which hardware. In its initial incarnation, this was the simple, basic job that Kubernetes was hired for.”
Original source: The Kubernetes Lesson

Link: Comparing Kubernetes to Pivotal Cloud Foundry — A Developer’s Perspective

Exactly what it says. The install and ops experiences are not covered, of course.
Original source: Comparing Kubernetes to Pivotal Cloud Foundry — A Developer’s Perspective

Link: Thoughts….

“Vendor lock-in is not the hardest thing to overcome, Architectural lock-in is harder to overcome. If you built your new app components today optimizing for constraints of a VM, you will have a harder time moving to future than migrating an app from AWS to GCP. For example, using Kubernetes for new workloads creates an architecture lock-in that you will have a harder time getting out of it and move to serverless. Even people migrating off of Oracle tech have reaped plenty of benefits from using Oracle stack for last 10–15 years. The current benefits of committing to a platform outweigh the future cost.”
Link to original

Link: Feel like a little kid in the container world? Welcome to the club

“industry adoption more accurately reflected in 451 Research’s survey data that pegs adoption at 27 per cent. Of those 27 per cent of enterprises that have container religion, just 52 per cent are running containers in production, according to the same survey. In other words, a mere 13.5 per cent (or so) of enterprises are running containers in production.”
Link to original

Docker and kubernetes

Dave Bartoletti, an analyst with IT consultancy Forrester, said it’s clear that Kubernetes has won at the orchestration layer. “There’s too much mindshare around it,” he said in a phone interview with The Register. “There are too many developers who just want this.”

Pretty much everyone has the sentiment that kubernetes has won.

More details from Joseph Tsidulko at CRN:

While some components of Enterprise Edition previously could be made to work with Kubernetes, the crucial control plane for managing the lifecycle of containerized applications was incompatible. Docker, however, had participated in the Kubernetes project, and always believed the technologies were complementary, Chanana said.
Docker is now focused on building out the components needed to make Kubernetes an enterprise-grade solution, just as it did with Swarm, he said, including security, high availability, and ease of use through its existing tools and control plane. Those are capabilities Docker uniquely can deliver to ease a lot of the struggles customers face in taking advantage of Kubernetes’ advanced container-scheduling capabilities.

Source: Kubernetes has won. Docker Enterprise Edition to support rival container-wrangling tech

Cloud Foundry, Docker, Kubernetes, and serverless: how it all fits together

Ian Andrews explains and whiteboards out how all the cloud-native infrastructure fits together:

Go to 7m21s if you want to skip right to the diagraming.

2017 Cloud Foundry Application Runtime Survey – Highlights

There’s a new survey out from the Cloud Foundry Foundation, looking at the users of Cloud Foundry. Here’s some highlights and notes:

  • Another ClearPath joint, n=735.
  • It’s important to keep in mind that this is covers all distress of Cloud Foundry, including open source (no vendor involved).
  • “The percentage of user respondents who require over three months
    per app drops from 51 percent to 18 percent after deploying Cloud Foundry Application Runtime”
  • “…while the percentage of user respondents who require less than a week climbs from 16 percent to 46 percent.”
  • “Nearly half (49 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are large enterprises ($1+ billion annual revenue).”
  • This chart is hard to read, but it shows a reduction in time to deploy across various time periods:
    before-after-release.
  • Uptake is early, but there are definitely mature users: “A plurality of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users (61 percent) describe their deployments as somewhere in the early stages—trial, PoC, evaluation, or a partial integration into specific business units. Meanwhile, 39 percent have deployed Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly across their company, from total integration in specific business groups to company-wide deployment.”
  • “Comcast, for example has more than 1500 developers using Cloud Foundry Application Runtime daily. Home Depot reports more than 2500 developers.”
  • “Comcast has seen between 50 percent and 75 percent improvement in productivity.”
  • “Half of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are currently using containers, such as Docker or rkt, with another 35 percent evaluating or deploying containers.”
  • Container management – there’s a wide variety of tools that people use for container orchestration, including DIY (14%). There’s a lot of interest in having CF do it: “Nearly three-quarters (71 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users currently using or evaluating containers are interested in adding container orchestration and management to their Cloud Foundry Application Runtime environment.” Hence, validating the Cloud Foundry Container Runtime.
  • Of course, the surveyed are already CF users, so they’re biased/driven by what they know.
  • Almost half of respondents say that getting started with CF. But people end up liking it: “An overwhelming majority of users (83 percent) would recommend Cloud Foundry Application Runtime to a colleague, including 60 percent who would do so strongly.”
  • “As more companies roll out Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly, the footprint continues to grow. Currently, 46 percent of users have more than 10 apps deployed on Cloud Foundry Application Runtime, including 18 percent with over 100 (and eight percent with over 500).” 4% have over 1,000 apps.
  • CF’s uses: “The primary use is for microservices (54 percent), followed by websites (38 percent), internal business applications (31 percent), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) (27 percent) and legacy software (eight percent).”
  • Validating multi-cloud: “60 percent say this is very important, and another 30 percent describe it as somewhat important.” Meanwhile, 53% are using more than one type of IaaS.