Link: Istio Aims To Be The Mesh Plumbing For Containerized Microservices

“The latter piece can be the tricky one when using containers to develop microservices. How do you link up all the component parts when they may be spread across a cluster of server nodes, and instances of them are continually popping up and later being retired as they are replaced by updated versions? In a service-oriented architecture (SOA), which microservices can be seen as the evolutionary heir to, this kind of task is analogous to that taken care of by an enterprise service bus (ESB). So what is needed is a kind of cloud-native version of an ESB…. This is the job that Istio, a relatively new open source project, aims to fill. It is officially described as a service mesh, because parts of it are distributed across the infrastructure alongside the containers it manages, and it sets out to meet the requirements of service discovery, load balancing, message routing, telemetry, and monitoring – and, of course, security.”
Original source: Istio Aims To Be The Mesh Plumbing For Containerized Microservices

Link: Containers and serverless functions – a modern architecture needs both and more

“While it’s unclear whether cost savings are the primary motivation for PaaS adoption, 62 percent of IT leaders (presumably a subset that omits developers and operations people) cite saving at least $100,000 by using PaaS instead of traditional development techniques.”

Also, summary of latest CFF survey and few other vendor sponsored surveys on PaaS, containers, and serverless.
Original source: Containers and serverless functions – a modern architecture needs both and more

Link: Will Containers Replace VMs?

“One of the most important benefits containers provide is that once you have a containerized application, it runs in exactly the same environment at every stage of the lifecycle, from initial development through testing and deployment, so you get mobility of a workload at every stage of its lifecycle,” said Iams. “In the past, you would develop an application and turn it over to production. Any environment they would be running it in would run into problems, so they’d kick it back to developers and you’d have to try to recreate the environment that it was running in. A lot of those issues go away once you containerize a workload.”
Original source: Will Containers Replace VMs?

Link: IBM Drops Cloud Management Platform Onto Kubernetes

“The CMS platform is used by organizations to manage enterprise applications. Those applications include offerings from SAP and Oracle. CMS includes security, disaster recovery, automated infrastructure, and application management…. IBM launched its Cloud Private service last November. It’s built on a Kubernetes-based container architecture that supports integration and portability of workloads between the cloud environment and management across multiple clouds. This includes IBM Cloud, IBM PowerVC, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and VMware on and off premises.”

Original source: IBM Drops Cloud Management Platform Onto Kubernetes