Link: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

“What we’re seeing at companies like MetLife or Northern Trust is they’re taking their app and infrastructure management cost, and cutting it in half. Let’s say that you can cut 15 million dollars out of your app and infrastructure management cost, which by the way, some of our customers are at. That’s 50 million dollars you can go spend on innovation. That’s not going to the CEO and saying look, I need another hundred million dollars in my budget. That’s freeing up 50-100 million dollars of your existing budget.”

I assume that jump from $15m to $50m is a typo, or something.
Original source: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

Link: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform

“With the acquisition, Container Linux will be reborn as Red Hat CoreOS, a new entry into the Red Hat ecosystem. Red Hat CoreOS will be based on Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux sources and is expected to ultimately supersede Atomic Host as Red Hat’s immutable, container-centric operating system.

“Red Hat CoreOS will provide the foundation for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat OpenShift Online, and Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform will also, of course, continue to support Red Hat Enterprise Linux for those who prefer its lifecycle and packaging as the foundation for their Kubernetes deployments.

“Current Container Linux users can rest easy that Red Hat plans continue investing in the operating system and community. The project is an important base for container-based environments by delivering automated updates with strong security capabilities, and as a part of our commitment and vision we plan to support Container Linux as you know it today for the community and Tectonic users alike.”
Original source: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform

Link: Why should Kubernetes be scared of AWS?

The scenario of AWS out-kubernetes kubernetes by layering another abstraction layer on-top of it to hide kubernetes from end-users “caring” about it: “In a not so distant future, users of container clusters will not care if they are using Kubernetes or under some AWS abstraction because it is the efficient way to do containers.”

Also, clever invocation or Xen as a historic analog.
Original source: Why should Kubernetes be scared of AWS?

Link: The Kubernetes Lesson

“In modern software development organizations, however, what gets used in development and testing environments has a habit of showing up in production. This was the opportunity that Kubernetes was built to take advantage of. It provided developers with a means – an open source means, naturally – of taking the containers they were so enamored of and running them in production environments, but without having to make determinations such as which containers run on which hardware. In its initial incarnation, this was the simple, basic job that Kubernetes was hired for.”
Original source: The Kubernetes Lesson

Link: Thoughts….

“Vendor lock-in is not the hardest thing to overcome, Architectural lock-in is harder to overcome. If you built your new app components today optimizing for constraints of a VM, you will have a harder time moving to future than migrating an app from AWS to GCP. For example, using Kubernetes for new workloads creates an architecture lock-in that you will have a harder time getting out of it and move to serverless. Even people migrating off of Oracle tech have reaped plenty of benefits from using Oracle stack for last 10–15 years. The current benefits of committing to a platform outweigh the future cost.”
Link to original

Link: Feel like a little kid in the container world? Welcome to the club

“industry adoption more accurately reflected in 451 Research’s survey data that pegs adoption at 27 per cent. Of those 27 per cent of enterprises that have container religion, just 52 per cent are running containers in production, according to the same survey. In other words, a mere 13.5 per cent (or so) of enterprises are running containers in production.”
Link to original