🗂 Link: USAA uses Google Cloud machine learning to estimate vehicle repair costs – SiliconANGLE

While Docker may be able to secure additional capital, it’s yet another company that finds itself in an ominous position after raising mounds of cash during the heady days earlier this decade. When Bearden joined in May, he became the fourth CEO and the third since 2017, replacing Steve Singh, a former senior executive at SAP. Docker’s founder Solomon Hykes left the company last year, and Mariana Tessel, the executive vice president of strategic development, departed in 2017 for Intuit.

Source: USAA uses Google Cloud machine learning to estimate vehicle repair costs – SiliconANGLE

🗂 Link: The superpower to change one thing about Kubernetes

“It’s optimized for cloud native applications – those that follow the patterns that are in my book for example. That represents only a subset of the applications that our enterprise customers need to address. Our 2020 strategy is to broaden the definition of our platform. To be more than just Cloud Foundry, but to broaden it to a larger range of use cases. To broaden it to a larger market.”

Source: The superpower to change one thing about Kubernetes

🗂 Link: VMworld 2019: VMware expands its multicloud, security, Kubernetes strategies | ZDNet

VMware in the span of seven days set its strategy to grab more multicloud deployments, positioned itself in case developers favor containers over virtual machines in the future and reiterated its case as a go-to enterprise engine for digital transformation.

Source: VMworld 2019: VMware expands its multicloud, security, Kubernetes strategies | ZDNet

🗂 Link: VMware Adds Containers to Its Cloud Provider Platform

The platform also added an integration with VMware’s container orchestrator, Enterprise PKS, which means cloud providers can offer containers-as-a-service. And at VMworld the vendor will showcase a technology preview of vCloud Director integration with Bitnami Community.

VMware bought Bitnami in May. It provides application packaging targeted at container and Kubernetes environments. The Bitnami Community houses one of the largest catalogs of click-to-deploy applications and development stacks. Combining this with and Enterprise PKS will allow VMware Cloud Providers to “provide a cloud that’s developer ready, and offer both VM-based workloads and container-based workloads from the same platform,” Bhardwaj said

Source: VMware Adds Containers to Its Cloud Provider Platform

Link: IBM fuses its software with Red Hat’s to launch hybrid-cloud juggernaut

The effort has started with IBM bundling Red Hat’s Kubernetes-based OpenShift Container Platform with more than 100 IBM products in what it calls Cloud Paks. OpenShift lets enterprise customers deploy and manage containers on their choice of infrastructure of choice, be it private or public clouds, including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, Alibaba and IBM Cloud.

The prepackaged Cloud Paks include a secured Kubernetes container and containerized IBM middleware designed to let customers quickly spin-up enterprise-ready containers, the company said.

Five Cloud Paks exist today: Cloud Pak for Data, Application, Integration, Automation and Multicloud Management. The Paks will ultimately include IBM’s DB2, WebSphere, API Connect, Watson Studio, Cognos Analytics and more

Source: IBM fuses its software with Red Hat’s to launch hybrid-cloud juggernaut

Link: Pivotal Build Service, Now Alpha, Assembles and Updates Containers in Kubernetes

The service provides the layer of automation and operational control enterprises need to utilize Cloud Native Buildpacks at scale. In particular, Build Service includes three key capabilities: automated image updates, image promotion, and build configurations.

Source: Pivotal Build Service, Now Alpha, Assembles and Updates Containers in Kubernetes

Containers are mostly just for large enterprises

Here, you see a shift in intentions to use containers, a pretty large one: less people are planning to use them. To me, containers are mostly useful for custom written software, not business application workloads.

So, several years ago, containers seemed like a cheaper VMware strategy where you just generically throw your apps in and reduce costs.

But, that doesn’t really work. Apps have to be container friendly, plus, you know, you have to manage your new container orchestration thing – figure out kubernetes. Even that has only been a thing (an option a generic IT team would know about and find viable enough to consider) for about the past year.

(I mean, maybe, if you soften the idea that kubernetes is a platform for building platforms and just think of it as a platform for running apps, that is, a platform. I don’t know what the fuck is going on in that definitional-wrangling space.)

These companies, I’d theorize, then, had the wrong assumptions, investigated container usage, and realized it wasn’t what they were expecting.

Containers are for running custom written software. If you don’t want to do that, they’re probably not useful to you.

As an important side-note, let’s assume use here means penetration, which is to say, respondents use at least one, or as few as, container. That means overall usage could be a tiny percentage of their total workloads – or big. We have no way of know how many containers they use. Not a big deal if you’re interested, as here, in y/y trends, that is, growth. That’s what investors want to see.

Equally important and enlightening here, as always, is to look at the demographics:

I don’t know what the the n is, the total number of respondents. There’s a good chunk that of what I’d fall “enterprise”: 10,000+ employees, and lots from finance. Let’s say around half? Spending wise, education usually doesn’t spend much (or write that much custom software?), and “Technology” typically less. Tech companies usually don’t buy shit and DIY it choosing to spend on their own people instead of vendors – they are, after all, technology companies, they think.

Also, it’s worth weighting this all by how few insurance and retail companies are in the respondent base: they have tons of custom written software, the stuff you’d put in containers.

So, you’ve really got two very different surveys and conclusions going on here, split by two different markets: those who write and run their own software (mostly large organizations) and those who don’t (mostly smaller organizations).

You see the general conclusion in the footnote: 10,000+ people companies (who have a good chance of writing and running their own software) already use containers and plan on using more.

Anyhow, half of respondents are small and mid-sized companies, plus those tech companies that don’t spend. So, spending wise, selling containers is probably mostly a large enterprise play cause that’s where they get used and paid for. They rest of the companies, likely, want SaaS and security.

Check out the rest of the report. It covers much, much more that the container neck of the woods.

Link: The computational legacy is Oracle’s cloud opportunity today

The company said it was saving most of its cloud-native announcements for KubeCon in December, but highlighted its new managed Kubernetes service (OKE, launched in May), platinum-level membership in the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation and growing support of open source projects (e.g., Fn, a functions project; Terraform for Oracle Cloud orchestration) as evidence that it has turned over a new, developer-friendly leaf. Oracle acknowledges a credibility gap with developers, but notes that it is at the start of making a transition similar to the one Microsoft has largely accomplished. As part of this effort, it may pursue acquisitions that give it access to customers that will help change Oracle’s image and shift the culture within the company (perhaps similar to what IBM is hoping to accomplish by buying Red Hat).
Original source: The computational legacy is Oracle’s cloud opportunity today

Link: Salesforce makes undisclosed “strategic investment” in Docker, companies will cross-sell MuleSoft and Docker Enterprise

As part of the new relationship between the companies, Docker and Salesforce’s recently acquired MuleSoft division will cross-sell each other’s products when courting companies that are looking to modernize their software development organizations. The collaboration extends beyond that, however; the two companies will also do integration work aimed at helping mutual customers take advantage of their investments in one platform by extending capabilities to the other platform.
Original source: Salesforce makes undisclosed “strategic investment” in Docker, companies will cross-sell MuleSoft and Docker Enterprise

Link: Rancher Labs Ropes Tencent, Alibaba, Huawei Support Into Containe

“The market has really heated up this year, and clearly that is what’s driving the acquisitions,” Williams said. “I’ve had a half-dozen customers tell me in the last month they see containerization and Kubernetes as the single most strategic project/platform in their company, and the future of their cloud strategy. It is certainly not surprising that companies are acquiring teams with strong container knowledge.”

Williams understandably passed on offering any insight into Rancher Labs’ own future. But he did note that Rancher Labs alone added 27 new customers during the third quarter, with nearly all part of the Fortune 500.
Original source: Rancher Labs Ropes Tencent, Alibaba, Huawei Support Into Containe

Link: Big Blue Puts on a Red Hat: IBM Acquires Red Hat

While many organizations have extensive on and off premise infrastructure investments, comparatively few of them are sophisticated in the way that those environments are tied to each other. If expectations are scaled back to the more realistic “multi-cloud” – the idea that an organization may have investments in more than one environment – the relevance and importance of OpenShift becomes more clear.

This is clever to point out that enterprises have enough trouble integrating their existing, on-premise stuff, let along the complexity and newness of tying together public and private cloud.
Original source: Big Blue Puts on a Red Hat: IBM Acquires Red Hat

Link: Container Orchestration Market – Global Forecast to 2023, from Research and Markets

The global container orchestration market size is expected to grow from USD 326.1 million in 2018 to USD 743.3 million by 2023, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 17.9% during the forecast period.

Composed of: SUSE, Oracle, Microsoft, Red Hat, AWS, Google, Docker, Mesosphere, Rancher Labs, Cisco, Critical Stack, Giant Swarm, Ericsson, Aptible, Kontena, SaltStack, Hashicorp, Shippable, Heroku, Joyent, Pivotal, Cloudify.
Original source: Container Orchestration Market – Global Forecast to 2023, from Research and Markets

Link: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

“Harbor is a privately hosted registry, which allows running either on-premises or in any of the major cloud vendors, making it a possibility for organizations that cannot use a public container registry or want to implement a multi-cloud strategy. Harbor started as an internal VMware project and became open source in 2016. Multiple partners, including companies like Pivotal and Rancher, either use Harbor for their container-based environment or work together with Harbor to give the possibility of running the project on their infrastructure. For instance, the Pivotal Container Service includes Harbor as its built-in container registry. For Rancher, Harbor is one of the packages you can deploy to provide a container registry. Moreover, Harbor gives the option to set up multiple instances of these registries on several of these platforms simultaneously and allows replication between them. Through the signing and vulnerability scanning capabilities provided by the project, it turns these into trusted resources.”
Original source: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

Link: Google sets Kubernetes free with $9m in its pocket for expenses

“CNCF has reason to be magnanimous beyond the Chocolate Factory prize money – cloud-oriented enterprise software is all the rage. According to CNCF stats published on Wednesday, production usage of CNCF projects has increased more than 200 per cent on average since December 2017 and evaluation – companies testing said code – has risen 372 per cent…. Among CNCF survey respondents – 2,400 IT-types mostly from the US and Europe – 40 per cent of those from enterprise companies (5,000+ employees) report running Kubernetes in production. Over the whole set of people answering the survey, 58 per cent said they are using Kubernetes in production, with 42 per cent considering it for future deployment.”
Original source: Google sets Kubernetes free with $9m in its pocket for expenses

Link: Istio Aims To Be The Mesh Plumbing For Containerized Microservices

“The latter piece can be the tricky one when using containers to develop microservices. How do you link up all the component parts when they may be spread across a cluster of server nodes, and instances of them are continually popping up and later being retired as they are replaced by updated versions? In a service-oriented architecture (SOA), which microservices can be seen as the evolutionary heir to, this kind of task is analogous to that taken care of by an enterprise service bus (ESB). So what is needed is a kind of cloud-native version of an ESB…. This is the job that Istio, a relatively new open source project, aims to fill. It is officially described as a service mesh, because parts of it are distributed across the infrastructure alongside the containers it manages, and it sets out to meet the requirements of service discovery, load balancing, message routing, telemetry, and monitoring – and, of course, security.”
Original source: Istio Aims To Be The Mesh Plumbing For Containerized Microservices

Link: Kubernetes for the Kubernewbie – The Journey

“Kubernetes was created to bring the idea of dynamic, container-centric, managed, scheduled-cluster thinking outside of Google… But what is a container and what does a containerized application mean in this context?”
Original source: Kubernetes for the Kubernewbie – The Journey

Link: Containers and serverless functions – a modern architecture needs both and more

“While it’s unclear whether cost savings are the primary motivation for PaaS adoption, 62 percent of IT leaders (presumably a subset that omits developers and operations people) cite saving at least $100,000 by using PaaS instead of traditional development techniques.”

Also, summary of latest CFF survey and few other vendor sponsored surveys on PaaS, containers, and serverless.
Original source: Containers and serverless functions – a modern architecture needs both and more