Kubernetes as the hybrid cloud magic maker

From 451’s report on Google Next:

Google believes that a hybrid architecture will persist in the coming years as enterprises continue to migrate workloads to various clouds. Its hybrid cloud architecture revolves around its virtual private cloud. Google VPC is an instantiation of GCP that can dedicate compute, storage and network resources to an enterprise. It is built upon Google’s proprietary private global network designed for high reliability, low latency and hardened security. Kubernetes acts as the orchestration and operational backplane for hybrid implementations. Elasticity and scale are achieved by linking to Google public cloud services.

It also has many numbers on market-share, SI/channel development, and geographic foot-print.

Source: Google Cloud Next 2017: Slow and steady race to greater enterprise public cloud adoption

451: Mesosphere momentum, container usage

From Jay Lyman:

Mesosphere says it is adding enterprise customers and building up deal sizes. The company has also grown its number of employees to 200, up from 150 in March. Mesosphere declined to comment, but 451 Research estimates its annual revenue is in the $25m range.”

And, from a recent survey on container usage:

Our Voice of the Enterprise (VotE) Software-Defined Infrastructure, Workloads and Key Projects survey, conducted in April and May, indicates that out of 718 enterprise IT decision-makers polled 23.7% have implemented containers. By comparison, 25.1% have implemented Software-Defined Networking, 26.7% have implemented Software-Defined Storage and 92.9% have implemented server virtualization.

Source: Mesosphere rises where containers and big data come together in the enterprise

Puppet and containers

When we’re talking with customers about the value that Puppet brings to them, invariably we talk about the future, and the future in their mind in some ways includes containers. There’s a lot experimentation going on. There’s a lot of Docker work being done and container work being done, Kubernetes work being done on their laptops. The conversations we have with them is how does Puppet help you bring it into production, into mission-critical production? How do you keep it secure? How do you operate it? All of those things that we know how to do and have done with various kinds of infrastructure, whether it was OpenStack, whether it was virtual machines, whether it’s just server configuration. For us, we take the same approach to containers and are evolving our road maps to make sure that customers have the same benefits they’ve have had over the years now with containers or other technology.

From an interview with Puppets CEO, Sanjay Mirchandani.

Link

The crowded cloud native space

The wider Cloud Native ecosystem is, however, a very disparate and confused place. We anticipate a significant level of consolidation over the next twelve to eighteen months with some clear winners emerging. The emergence of several opinionated distributions of Kubernetes is hardly a surprise and this space will expand a little further before settling down.

Link

The Container Landscape, choosing what to do now

A round-up of all sorts of container stacks, and some advice on what to do:

Therefore, the key lessons learned from this event (from developer’s perspective): Do not focus on developing code for the container under the hood. Care instead about the business logic. Implement your microservices in a vendor agnostic way.

Do not make the same fault as we all did with J2EE / Java EE where all vendors used the same standard specifications, but still offered many vendor-dependent features and “added value” in their specific “standard implementation”. Migration, i.e. deployment to another Java EE application server was a lot of efforts (re-development, testing, …); sometimes a complete re-write was easier and faster.

There’s a lot of fragmentation in container land now. This is what Linux must have felt like back in the late 90s.

Our advice at Pivotal, of course, is to focus on using Spring and other services towards the top of the stack for that layer of lock-in protection.

Link

Top container challenges: management, monitoring, storage

I keep wanting to write up the recent Cloud Foundry Foundation container survey, mixing it in with other recent container surveys. Yup, “keep wanting to.” Meanwhile, Abby wrote-up a brief overview over in O’Reilly land.

Source: 3 facts about container adoption you don’t know – O’Reilly Media

Container momemtum, according to Huawei

During his talk, Xiong discussed the growing use of containers in China. In 2016, Huawei found that 14 percent of companies were using containers in production, and another 23 percent were using them for test and development. About 44 percent had plans to adopt container technologies within the next six months.

While 14 percent is still fairly low, it is growing rapidly. It is up 250 percent in the past year. “To me, that means the tools are maturing,” Xiong said.

Of those using containers in production, about 42 percent were using a formal orchestration tool, such as Kubernetes, compared to 51 percent who were using scripts and other homebuilt tools.

Source: Huawei Launches a Kubernetes-based Container Engine

How Cloud Native Computing Is Evolving

In the last 15 years, application delivery has moved from being bound to physical servers to running on virtual machines with a full operating system and now to containers with Docker where developers can specify every aspect of deployment, he added.

The move has also been a shift from a heavyweight application deployment model to a lightweight model that takes less time to start up and deploy applications. Additionally, there has been a move from being bound to a single closed-source vendor to an open-source model with multiple vendors, less risk of lock-in and more choice.

And, on the maturity front:

not all organizations are ready for the move, according to Donnie Berkholz, research director at 451 Group. He pointed to a recent survey his firm conducted that found that most IT organizations are still running lots of manual process and aren’t in the DevOps world, and many aren’t even using agile development methods either. For cloud native to make sense, organizations need to make use of continuous integration and continuous development technologies, Berkholz said.

“You can’t do cloud native if you don’t have the right processes to support it,” Berkholz said. “For some of the world, it’s a long way to go on the journey to cloud native, and it will take at least five years to get there.”

Source: How Cloud Native Computing Is Evolving