Docker and kubernetes

Dave Bartoletti, an analyst with IT consultancy Forrester, said it’s clear that Kubernetes has won at the orchestration layer. “There’s too much mindshare around it,” he said in a phone interview with The Register. “There are too many developers who just want this.”

Pretty much everyone has the sentiment that kubernetes has won.

More details from Joseph Tsidulko at CRN:

While some components of Enterprise Edition previously could be made to work with Kubernetes, the crucial control plane for managing the lifecycle of containerized applications was incompatible. Docker, however, had participated in the Kubernetes project, and always believed the technologies were complementary, Chanana said.
Docker is now focused on building out the components needed to make Kubernetes an enterprise-grade solution, just as it did with Swarm, he said, including security, high availability, and ease of use through its existing tools and control plane. Those are capabilities Docker uniquely can deliver to ease a lot of the struggles customers face in taking advantage of Kubernetes’ advanced container-scheduling capabilities.

Source: Kubernetes has won. Docker Enterprise Edition to support rival container-wrangling tech

2017 Cloud Foundry Application Runtime Survey – Highlights

There’s a new survey out from the Cloud Foundry Foundation, looking at the users of Cloud Foundry. Here’s some highlights and notes:

  • Another ClearPath joint, n=735.
  • It’s important to keep in mind that this is covers all distress of Cloud Foundry, including open source (no vendor involved).
  • “The percentage of user respondents who require over three months
    per app drops from 51 percent to 18 percent after deploying Cloud Foundry Application Runtime”
  • “…while the percentage of user respondents who require less than a week climbs from 16 percent to 46 percent.”
  • “Nearly half (49 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are large enterprises ($1+ billion annual revenue).”
  • This chart is hard to read, but it shows a reduction in time to deploy across various time periods:
    before-after-release.
  • Uptake is early, but there are definitely mature users: “A plurality of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users (61 percent) describe their deployments as somewhere in the early stages—trial, PoC, evaluation, or a partial integration into specific business units. Meanwhile, 39 percent have deployed Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly across their company, from total integration in specific business groups to company-wide deployment.”
  • “Comcast, for example has more than 1500 developers using Cloud Foundry Application Runtime daily. Home Depot reports more than 2500 developers.”
  • “Comcast has seen between 50 percent and 75 percent improvement in productivity.”
  • “Half of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are currently using containers, such as Docker or rkt, with another 35 percent evaluating or deploying containers.”
  • Container management – there’s a wide variety of tools that people use for container orchestration, including DIY (14%). There’s a lot of interest in having CF do it: “Nearly three-quarters (71 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users currently using or evaluating containers are interested in adding container orchestration and management to their Cloud Foundry Application Runtime environment.” Hence, validating the Cloud Foundry Container Runtime.
  • Of course, the surveyed are already CF users, so they’re biased/driven by what they know.
  • Almost half of respondents say that getting started with CF. But people end up liking it: “An overwhelming majority of users (83 percent) would recommend Cloud Foundry Application Runtime to a colleague, including 60 percent who would do so strongly.”
  • “As more companies roll out Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly, the footprint continues to grow. Currently, 46 percent of users have more than 10 apps deployed on Cloud Foundry Application Runtime, including 18 percent with over 100 (and eight percent with over 500).” 4% have over 1,000 apps.
  • CF’s uses: “The primary use is for microservices (54 percent), followed by websites (38 percent), internal business applications (31 percent), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) (27 percent) and legacy software (eight percent).”
  • Validating multi-cloud: “60 percent say this is very important, and another 30 percent describe it as somewhat important.” Meanwhile, 53% are using more than one type of IaaS.

Bloomberg on kubernetes in Cloud Foundry

On overview of how Bloomberg is looking at the likes of Pivotal Container Services:

“Many Kubernetes distributions are good on day one, when they’re first deployed,” said Andrey Rybka, technical architect in the office of the CTO at Bloomberg, the global finance, media and tech company based in New York. “But what happens on day two, when something fails? Kubernetes doesn’t [automatically] address things like failures at the physical node level.”

And:

The roadmap for Cloud Foundry Container Runtime includes support for stateful applications based on the StatefulSets feature that became available with Kubernetes 1.7 in June. The foundation also plans to integrate the Istio project, founded by IBM, Google and Lyft in May, which helps to manage network communications between microservices

Also, see coverage of the general announcement in TechCrunch, the related press release, and our discussion in this week’s podcast.

Source: Cloud Foundry Container Runtime eases Kubernetes ops

Puppet’s new pipeline & kubernetes tools

The three new Puppet products based on Distelli’s technology are Puppet Pipelines for Apps, which automates key application development and delivery tasks; Puppet Pipelines for Containers, which enables users to build Docker images from a repository and deploy them to Kubernetes clusters; and Puppet Container Registry, which gives developers a comprehensive view of their Docker images across all repositories.

Source: Puppet Launches Barrage Of Products To Enable ‘New Age’ Of Software Automation And DevOps

451’s container orchestration usage survey – Notebook


As part of CoreOS’s conference this week, 451 put out a sponsored study on container orchestration. It’s been much cited and is free, so it’s worth taking a look. Here’s my highlights and notes:

  • Leadgen yourself to CoreOS get a copy of the report.
  • This report is really more of a “container orchestration usage” report than much about “hybrid cloud.”
  • Demographics:
    • “We surveyed 201 enterprise IT decision-makers in April and May 2017. This was not a survey of developers; rather, we received responses from those in C-level and director-level positions, including CISO, CTO, CIO, director of IT, IT Ops and DevOps, and VPs and managers of IT.”
    • All from the US
    • “All of our survey respondents came from organizations using application containers, and all were familiar with their organization’s use of containers.” – This survey, then, tells you what people who’re already using containers are doing, not what the entire market is thinking and planning on.
    • “A significant slice of the survey respondents represented large enterprises.”
  • Organizations are hoping to use containers for “[a] ‘leapfrog’ effect, whereby containers are viewed as a way to skip adoption of other technologies, was tested, and a majority of respondents think Kubernetes and other container management and orchestration software is sufficient to replace both private clouds and PaaS.”
  • Obviously I’m biased, being at Pivotal, but the question here is “to do what?” As we like to say around here, you’re going to end-up with a platform. People need a “platform” on-top of that raw IaaS, and as things like Icito show (not to mention Pivotal’s ongoing momentum), the lower levels aren’t cutting the mustard.
  • There’s an ongoing semantic argument about what “PaaS” means to be mindful of, as well: in contexts like these, the term is often taken to mean “that old stuff, before, like 2009.” At the very least, as with Gartner’s PaaS Magic Quadrant, the phrase often means means “only in the public cloud.” Again, the point is: if you’re developing and running software you need an application development, middleware, and services platform. Call it whatever you like, but make sure you have it. It’s highly likely that these “whatever you want to call ‘PaaS’ PaaSes” will run on-top of and with container orchestration layers, for example, as Cloud Foundry does and is doing.
  • That said, it’s not uncommon for me to encounter people in organizations who really do have a “just the containers, and maybe some kubernates” mind-set in the planning phase of their cloud-native stuff. Of course, they frequently end-up needing more.
  • Back to the survey: keeping in mind that all respondents were already using containers (or at least committed to doing so, I think), ~27% had “initial” production container use, ~25% of respondents had “broad” containers in production. So, if you were being happy-path, you’d say “over half of respondents have containers in production.”
  • In a broader survey (where, presumably, not every enterprise was already using containers), of 300+ enterprises, production container use was: 19% in initial production, 8% were in broad production implementation.
  • Nonetheless, 451 has been tracking steady, high growth in container usage for the past few years, putting the container market at $2.7B by 2020 and $1.1bn in 2017.
  • As the report says, it’s more interesting to see what benefits users actually find once they’re using the technology. Their original desires are often just puppy-love notions after actual usage:

  • Interesting note on lock-in: “Given that avoiding vendor lock-in is generally a priority for organizations, it might seem surprising that it was not ranked higher as an advantage since much of the container software used today is open source… However, our respondents for this study were users of containers, and may have assumed that the technology would be open source and, thus, lock-in less of a concern.” (There’s a whole separate report from Gartner on lock-in that I’ll take a look at, and, of course, some 140 character level analysis.)
  • On marketshare, rated by usage, not revenue:

  • On that note, it’s easy to misread the widely quoted finding of “[n]early three-quarters (71 percent) of respondents indicated they are using Kubernetes” as meaning only Kubernetes. Actually, people are using many of them at once. The report clarifies this: “The fact that almost 75% of organizations reported using Kubernetes while the same group also reported significant use of other container management and orchestration software is evidence of a mixed market.”

As one last piece of context, one of the more recent Gartner surveys for container usage puts usage at around 18%, with 4% of that being “significant production use”:


Of course, looks at more specialized slices of the market find higher usage.

This early in the container market, it’s good to pay close attention to surveys because the sample size will be small, selective, and most people will only have used containers for a short while. But, there’s good stuff in this survey, it’s definitely worth looking at and using.

Software Defined Talk: Cloud Rules Everything Around Me – Red Hat, Moby, Docker CEO, and Halo Effect’ing The First Cloud Wars

There’s much news in the container world with DockerCon and Red Hat having had conferences, plus Docker gets a new CEO. We also do a hind-sight analysis of what wrong with the losers of the Cloud Wars. And, as always, recommendations from the three of us.

Be all civilized and modern by subscribing to the feed, or just download the MP3 directly if you prefer utter, complete control over your ear-holes.

Containers in production survey, RedMonk/Anchore – Highlights

Some highlights from a recent survey on container usage among 338 respondents to a Anchore/DevOps.com survey:

Containers in production:
anchore-cu
…approximately one third of the participants are running containers in production, with development coming in slightly higher.
OS used:
Looking at the top five host operating systems across user roles we see Ubuntu having a particular strong lead among developers and architects.
Mesos, architect-types like it:
Interestingly Mesos still features strongly with architects. Among developer communities we very rarely hear Mesos mentioned anymore. On the other hand we frequently encounter architects have invested in Mesos from the perspective of their big data environments and are looking at a common approach for their container strategy. That said, this entire market is extremely fluid at the moment.
Jenkins leads CI:
…the combination of Jenkins and CloudBees (commercial Jenkins) approaching 50%.
Security worries:
Bluntly put [security] presents a barrier to adoption, and an opportunity for conservative organisations to hold off on adopting new technologies.
Demographics:
Our population breaks out with over 60% working in companies of greater than 100 people [and ~30% working in companies of greater than 5,000 people]…. With any data set of this nature, it is important to state that survey results strictly reflect the members of the DevOps.com community.
More context:
  • As you’ll recall, 451 estimates that the container market will be $2.7bn in 2020.
  • A 451 Research 1Q16 survey puts production use of containers at ~14%. It’s likely risen sense then, of course: maybe to around 18 to 20%?
  • A 3Q2015 survey put “container orchestration” use at just ~9%. Presumably this is dev/test and production, all uses. And, again, you’d assume that it’s risen since then. The question would be: are people using containers in production without orchestration? That seems slightly crazy except for the simplest workloads, eh?

The coming licensing hassles with Dockerized enterprise software

indiana-jones-snakes.jpg
“Licensing. Why’d it have to be licensing?”

Jon Hall, who always has good things to say about traditional IT Service Management butting up against Melinum IT, points out an all too common hassle with new ways of packaging and running IT: accounting for traditional licensing. Here, he points out a likely licensing counting problem with Docker-ized applications, e.g., with Oracle licensing when it comes to the recent, official Docker images with Oracle software in ’em:

But theres a serious gotcha here: as any Software Asset Manager could point out, these actions could have just cost the company a pretty staggering amount of money. How? By falling foul of Oracles notoriously complex licensing system.
Oracle licensing is bloody complex, and its entirely possible that a goalpost or two might have moved by the time you read this.
Oracle Parking.jpg