Link: Starbucks teases coffee traceability app feature, compostable cup trial

This focus on the people behind the coffee beans could strengthen positive consumer sentiment around Starbucks’ brand and give it more of a human element as it continues to stretch its global reach. The move could also drive other coffee chains to make their supply chain journeys accessible to their customers. Investing in traceability isn’t unusual in the coffee space — Philz Coffee, for example, provides a breakdown of the steps of the coffee journey it has access to, but leveraging that information for interactive marketing purposes is still a ripe opportunity.

Source: Starbucks teases coffee traceability app feature, compostable cup trial

Hotel robots bad, coffee robots good

Jeff Bezos walking with robot dog

But when the robots were put in place, things went wrong. The concierge struggled to answer guests’ questions. The dancers in the lobby broke down. The luggage-carriers could not climb stairs or go outside. A question-and-answer robot could not handle anything beyond basic inquiries—and responded to at least one guest’s snoring by waking him repeatedly to tell him it could not understand what he was saying. Rather than saving labour, the robots actually required the hotel to increase staffing in order to assist and repair the struggling robots. So the hotel recently decided to lay off more than half of its 243 robots.

Hotel robots bad. But, from the same “newspaper,” as they say, turns out robots are good for coffee and burger production:

Gavin pathross likes his Americano at a particular strength, with exactly 2.8 shots of espresso, an order that human baristas struggle to get right. But the baristas at Ratio, his new coffee shop in Shanghai, are anything but human. Customers specify, order and pay for their coffee via their smartphones. A robot arm then grinds the beans, pumps shots of espresso and carries out the rest of the work. The robot can supply water and coffee in any ratio desired—hence the shop’s name. Once it has prepared the beverage, it passes the finished product to a human waiter for serving.

Link: How a holding company that sold pool chemicals pivoted into a $20B coffee empire

“In recent years, JAB has quietly plunked down majority stakes in some of the biggest coffee brands in the world, including Keurig ($13.9B), Peet’s Coffee ($974m), Stumptown, Intelligentsia, and the Caribou Coffee Company. JAB also bought out coffee-related food chains like Krispy Kreme ($1.35B) and Panera Bread ($7.5B), and put up $18.7B for soft drink giant Dr Pepper Snapple Group in a bid to bolster its distribution.”
Original source: How a holding company that sold pool chemicals pivoted into a $20B coffee empire

Link: How a holding company that sold pool chemicals pivoted into a $20B coffee empire

“In recent years, JAB has quietly plunked down majority stakes in some of the biggest coffee brands in the world, including Keurig ($13.9B), Peet’s Coffee ($974m), Stumptown, Intelligentsia, and the Caribou Coffee Company. JAB also bought out coffee-related food chains like Krispy Kreme ($1.35B) and Panera Bread ($7.5B), and put up $18.7B for soft drink giant Dr Pepper Snapple Group in a bid to bolster its distribution.”
Original source: How a holding company that sold pool chemicals pivoted into a $20B coffee empire

Coté Memo #058: Cloud ads, amateur coffee drinkers, orchiwhu?

Follow-up

Why the apparent reversal in the thinking about coffee? Earlier studies didn’t always take into account that known high-risk behaviors, such as smoking and physical inactivity, tended to be more common among heavy coffee drinkers at that time.

Studies have shown that coffee may have health benefits, including protecting against Parkinson’s disease, type 2 diabetes and liver disease, including liver cancer. It also appears to improve cognitive function and decrease the risk of depression. {{{More like: so long as you keep drinking coffee, you will not get depressed. A subtle, but important difference.}}}

However, the research appears to bear out some risks. High consumption of unfiltered coffee (boiled or espresso) has been associated with mild elevations in cholesterol levels {{{Doing good so far…}}}. And some studies {{{Uh-oh…}}} found that two or more cups of coffee a day can increase the risk of heart disease in people with a specific — and fairly common — genetic mutation that slows the breakdown of caffeine in the body. So, how quickly you metabolize coffee may affect your health risk.

Let’s get something straight: if you drink less than two (real talk: let’s say 4) cups of coffee a day, you’re just a recreational coffee drinker. I, sirs, am a professional.

Now, I need to go run my DNA in the hay-doop cluster to see about that “genetic mutation.”

Tech & Work World

Cloud Ads

In case you didn’t know, IT is my hobby and my job. I like to collect pictures of cloud ads in airports and otherwise (see above about keeping the flow of coffee steady).

Here’s some from my recent trip to Amsterdam:

2014-12-04 09.46.41

2014-12-02 23.10.13

Send me some #cloudads!

One of my favorite IT ads ever, from 2008:

New Compuware Ad

I like the look on the dude’s face in background: “not gonna happen, ladies.”

Quick Hits

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Fun & IRL

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