Link: IBM Drops Cloud Management Platform Onto Kubernetes

“The CMS platform is used by organizations to manage enterprise applications. Those applications include offerings from SAP and Oracle. CMS includes security, disaster recovery, automated infrastructure, and application management…. IBM launched its Cloud Private service last November. It’s built on a Kubernetes-based container architecture that supports integration and portability of workloads between the cloud environment and management across multiple clouds. This includes IBM Cloud, IBM PowerVC, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and VMware on and off premises.”

Original source: IBM Drops Cloud Management Platform Onto Kubernetes

Link: Serverless Impacts on Business, Process and Culture

‘Sharples said the main interest stems from an enterprise love of microservices, where incremental delivery, agility and faster delivery are being embraced. “But we see adopters struggle with the operational complexity of managing and monitoring distributed systems, and that is where serverless has gotten their attention. You get the microservices benefits, but from a developer perspective it is very easy — it is just about the code. And on the ops side, serverless is a very good model for those building automated ops systems. To respond to a log event, doing that as a serverless invocation is pretty convenient.” Sharples says that in his weekly and daily chats with enterprise customers, serverless is piquing their interest.’

Microservicoed fine in dev, SRE problem now.
Original source: Serverless Impacts on Business, Process and Culture

Link: Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) Is Now Generally Available – More Regions and New Features

“The GA release of AKS includes a set of new features available in all regions like the Kubernetes role-based access control (RBAC), Azure Active Directory-based identity, and the ability to deploy clusters into pre-existing custom virtual networks.”
Original source: Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) Is Now Generally Available – More Regions and New Features

Link: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

“In practice and actual fact, what really matters for older Kubernetes version support is the continued availability and exercising of its end-to-end testing pipeline. If the machinery to quickly update an old release continues to exist, and exist in a state of good (non-flakey) repair, cutting a patch release is just a matter of someone – you, your provider or your vendor – having the engineering gumption to push it through. If a critical security fix isn’t back-ported to an older Kubernetes version, that’s a strong sign that no reasonably professional team is using that version in production anymore.”
Original source: The full-time job of keeping up with Kubernetes

Link: CNCF Brings the Helm Package Manager for Kubernetes into the Fold

“The software allows users to share applications as Kubernetes charts. The applications themselves, under Helm, can be consistently set up across different Kubernetes deployments. The software also provides a way to manage individual Kubernetes manifests, or configuration files… Helm joins a growing number of CNCF projects, all designed to ease the process of running workloads on cloud services in a vendor-neutral way. Other projects include Prometheus, OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Envoy, Jaeger, Notary, TUF, Vitess, and NATS.”
Original source: CNCF Brings the Helm Package Manager for Kubernetes into the Fold

Link: The State Of The Kubernetes Ecosystem

Overview of the (vendor) players.

Also:

  • “According to predictions from 451 Research, the market is set to grow from $762 million in 2016 to $2.7 billion by 2020.”

  • “A Forrester study found that 66% of organizations who adopted containers experienced accelerated developers efficiency, while 75% of companies achieved a moderate to significant increase in application deployment speed.”
    Original source: The State Of The Kubernetes Ecosystem

Link: The State Of The Kubernetes Ecosystem

Overview of the (vendor) players.

Also:

  • “According to predictions from 451 Research, the market is set to grow from $762 million in 2016 to $2.7 billion by 2020.”

  • “A Forrester study found that 66% of organizations who adopted containers experienced accelerated developers efficiency, while 75% of companies achieved a moderate to significant increase in application deployment speed.”
    Original source: The State Of The Kubernetes Ecosystem

Link: The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point | InfoWorld

“Enterprises want stuff that works. As much as we in the open source world chatter and fret about vendor lockin, enterprises have demonstrated a remarkable ability to shrug off that concern and buy deeply into Microsoft, Oracle, and, yes, Red Hat’s OpenShift.”
Original source: The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point | InfoWorld

Link: Full Cycle Developers at Netflix

How Netflix thinks about standardized platforms and tools, plus their adaptation of DevOps and SRE.

“Full cycle developers apply engineering discipline to all areas of the life cycle. They evaluate problems from a developer perspective and ask questions like “how can I automate what is needed to operate this system?” and “what self-service tool will enable my partners to answer their questions without needing me to be involved?” This helps our teams scale by favoring systems-focused rather than humans-focused thinking and automation over manual approaches.”
Original source: Full Cycle Developers at Netflix

Link: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

“A lot of institutions are figuring out that Ubuntu and upstream Kubernetes gives them 80% of what they need from PaaS, while the open Kubernetes ecosystem takes care of the remaining 20%. And that comes in at a third of the cost of Red Hat,” he said.

Also, he says they’re much cheaper than VMware and RHEL.
Original source: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

Link: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

“What we’re seeing at companies like MetLife or Northern Trust is they’re taking their app and infrastructure management cost, and cutting it in half. Let’s say that you can cut 15 million dollars out of your app and infrastructure management cost, which by the way, some of our customers are at. That’s 50 million dollars you can go spend on innovation. That’s not going to the CEO and saying look, I need another hundred million dollars in my budget. That’s freeing up 50-100 million dollars of your existing budget.”

I assume that jump from $15m to $50m is a typo, or something.
Original source: Can IT finally deliver innovation without busting its own budget? Docker’s CEO says yes.

Link: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

‘Importantly, the OpenShift platform cloud software, which included Red Hat’s own implementation of the Kubernetes container controller, will be deployable on either the full-on Red Hat Enterprise Linux in pets mode or the minimalist Red Hat CoreOS in cattle mode. But it will be using the Tectonic version of the Kubernetes controller going forward as well as integrating the Prometheus monitoring tool and etcd for storing telemetry. Gracely tells The Next Platform that the implementation of Kubernetes had outside dependencies such as the CloudForms hybrid cloud management tool (formerly ManageIQ) and was not “native” to Kubernetes in the same way that Tectonic is, meaning free of outside dependenies.’
Original source: CoreOS Is New Linux, Not A RHEL Classic Killer

Link: Air Force looks to rapidly develop software with Project Kessel Run

More coverage of the USAF modernizing their approach to software. Here, what some of the apps are: “Kessel Run has been able to push five applications to the classified network, Kroger said…. The project is currently working on a number of things, including how the Air Force plans air tasking orders, a document which tasks units to fly their aircraft, Kroger said. It’s also working on building a tool that automates mission reports, which have to be written for every mission that flies, Kroger said.”

Original source: Air Force looks to rapidly develop software with Project Kessel Run

Link: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform

“With the acquisition, Container Linux will be reborn as Red Hat CoreOS, a new entry into the Red Hat ecosystem. Red Hat CoreOS will be based on Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux sources and is expected to ultimately supersede Atomic Host as Red Hat’s immutable, container-centric operating system.

“Red Hat CoreOS will provide the foundation for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat OpenShift Online, and Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform will also, of course, continue to support Red Hat Enterprise Linux for those who prefer its lifecycle and packaging as the foundation for their Kubernetes deployments.

“Current Container Linux users can rest easy that Red Hat plans continue investing in the operating system and community. The project is an important base for container-based environments by delivering automated updates with strong security capabilities, and as a part of our commitment and vision we plan to support Container Linux as you know it today for the community and Tectonic users alike.”
Original source: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform