Link: Istio Aims To Be The Mesh Plumbing For Containerized Microservices

“The latter piece can be the tricky one when using containers to develop microservices. How do you link up all the component parts when they may be spread across a cluster of server nodes, and instances of them are continually popping up and later being retired as they are replaced by updated versions? In a service-oriented architecture (SOA), which microservices can be seen as the evolutionary heir to, this kind of task is analogous to that taken care of by an enterprise service bus (ESB). So what is needed is a kind of cloud-native version of an ESB…. This is the job that Istio, a relatively new open source project, aims to fill. It is officially described as a service mesh, because parts of it are distributed across the infrastructure alongside the containers it manages, and it sets out to meet the requirements of service discovery, load balancing, message routing, telemetry, and monitoring – and, of course, security.”
Original source: Istio Aims To Be The Mesh Plumbing For Containerized Microservices

Link: Kubernetes for the Kubernewbie – The Journey

“Kubernetes was created to bring the idea of dynamic, container-centric, managed, scheduled-cluster thinking outside of Google… But what is a container and what does a containerized application mean in this context?”
Original source: Kubernetes for the Kubernewbie – The Journey

Link: Configuring your release pipelines for safe deployments

“Also, it is recommended to not deploy to all production environments in one go, exposing all the customers to the changes. A gradual rollout that exposes the changes to customers over a period, thereby implicitly validating the changes in production with a smaller set of customers at a time… As an example, for an application is deployed in 12 regions with US regions (4) having a high load, European regions (4) having a medium load and Asian regions (4) having a relatively lighter load, following would be the order of rollout.”
Original source: Configuring your release pipelines for safe deployments

Link: Configuring your release pipelines for safe deployments

“Also, it is recommended to not deploy to all production environments in one go, exposing all the customers to the changes. A gradual rollout that exposes the changes to customers over a period, thereby implicitly validating the changes in production with a smaller set of customers at a time… As an example, for an application is deployed in 12 regions with US regions (4) having a high load, European regions (4) having a medium load and Asian regions (4) having a relatively lighter load, following would be the order of rollout.”
Original source: Configuring your release pipelines for safe deployments

Link: Progressive Delivery, a History…. Condensed

“On the business side, Progressive Delivery involves two core changes in the delivery model:

Release progression – progressively increasing the number of users that are able to see (and are impacted by) new features (e.g. Stage 1: visible to developers only; Stage 2: visible to developers and beta users; Stage 3: visible to more users; Stage n: visible to everyone)

Delegation – progressively delegating the control of the feature to the owner that is most closely responsible for the outcome. (e.g. Stage 1: Release owner = dev. Stage 2: Release owner = PM; Stage 3: Release owner = Marketing; Stage n: Release owner = Customer Success)

An important point about delegation: while the initial implementation likely involves both the assignment of responsibility as well as the need for manual approval or action, the goal should be to base all of the delegation changes or release progressions on criteria and use metrics and event data to automate the transitions.”
Original source: Progressive Delivery, a History…. Condensed

Link: Google Cloud Platform Blog: Cloud Services Platform: bringing the best of the cloud to you

Round-up of developer related stuff from Google.
Original source: Google Cloud Platform Blog: Cloud Services Platform: bringing the best of the cloud to you

Link: TUTORIAL – Deploying Software on PKS: Creating a Continuous Delivery Pipeline with Spinnaker

“I can see how on larger teams with meaningful applications it could add a ton of value and help streamline the deployment processes.”
Original source: TUTORIAL – Deploying Software on PKS: Creating a Continuous Delivery Pipeline with Spinnaker

Link: TUTORIAL – Deploying Software on PKS: Creating a Continuous Delivery Pipeline with Spinnaker

“I can see how on larger teams with meaningful applications it could add a ton of value and help streamline the deployment processes.”
Original source: TUTORIAL – Deploying Software on PKS: Creating a Continuous Delivery Pipeline with Spinnaker

Link: Istio sets sail as Red Hat renovates OpenShift container ship

“The software serves as a management mechanism for distributed microservices, providing capabilities like traffic management, service identity and security, policy enforcement and telemetry among apps running across multiple Kubernetes clusters and hosts.”
Original source: Istio sets sail as Red Hat renovates OpenShift container ship

Link: Lessons from Elad Gil and High Growth Handbook

It’d be useful at some point to compare the “how to be a startup” advice to “how to modernize and suite of enterprise applications.” For example, an enterprise often knows its product/market fit (e.g., selling kidnapping insurance to executives). However, it may not know the best product/technology approach (it needs a mobile app that tracks when the executive leaves the country), or product/design fit (the executive’s assistant does most of the interaction with the software, so you need to add a secondary user).

For enterprises, there’s much to be learned from startup think, but there’s also much that’s different.
Original source: Lessons from Elad Gil and High Growth Handbook

Link: Kubernetes is the new app server

Indeed!

‘Then there’s the whole cloud angle. Kubernetes has “quickly become the central container orchestration engine for most major cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, IBM Cloud, and Red Hat OpenShift,” Guiu states. “With services like Amazon EKS, Azure Kubernetes Service, and Google Kubernetes Engine the developer experience is becoming more seamless and doesn’t require a developer to install, manage, or operate Kubernetes clusters. We’re going to see further innovation here so that a developer can just drop an application and run it in Kubernetes without having to build the Docker image.”’
Original source: Kubernetes is the new app server

Link: The DNA of adaptability: How Kubernetes hosts and manages a plethora of different workloads

Overview of what kubernetes is, sort of for management-types.
Original source: The DNA of adaptability: How Kubernetes hosts and manages a plethora of different workloads

Link: Goodbye Microservices: From 100s of problem children to 1 superstar

“Briefly, microservices is a service-oriented software architecture in which server-side applications are constructed by combining many single-purpose, low-footprint network services. The touted benefits are improved modularity, reduced testing burden, better functional composition, environmental isolation, and development team autonomy. The opposite is a Monolithic architecture, where a large amount of functionality lives in a single service which is tested, deployed, and scaled as a single unit.”

That’s a good definition!
Original source: Goodbye Microservices: From 100s of problem children to 1 superstar

Link: “An astonishing paper that may explain why it’s so difficult to patch.”

The most important thing is to be able to fix The Broken quickly, not make sure it never breaks.

“They monitored 400 libraries. In 116 days, they saw 282 breaking changes! Each day, there’s 6.1% chance of breaking chg, for each lib you use!”
Original source: “An astonishing paper that may explain why it’s so difficult to patch.”

Link: Will Containers Replace VMs?

“One of the most important benefits containers provide is that once you have a containerized application, it runs in exactly the same environment at every stage of the lifecycle, from initial development through testing and deployment, so you get mobility of a workload at every stage of its lifecycle,” said Iams. “In the past, you would develop an application and turn it over to production. Any environment they would be running it in would run into problems, so they’d kick it back to developers and you’d have to try to recreate the environment that it was running in. A lot of those issues go away once you containerize a workload.”
Original source: Will Containers Replace VMs?