🗂 Link: Kubernetes’ next step could be to try orchestrating everything else

Could every element of an enterprise data center’s infrastructure — not just those newfangled containers, but virtual machines, “big data” platforms, and machine learning frameworks — all eventually become orchestrated by Kubernetes, a product originally born out of Google’s need to make order out of chaos?

Source: Kubernetes’ next step could be to try orchestrating everything else

🗂 Link: VMworld 2019: VMware expands its multicloud, security, Kubernetes strategies | ZDNet

VMware in the span of seven days set its strategy to grab more multicloud deployments, positioned itself in case developers favor containers over virtual machines in the future and reiterated its case as a go-to enterprise engine for digital transformation.

Source: VMworld 2019: VMware expands its multicloud, security, Kubernetes strategies | ZDNet

🗂 Link: VMware plan elevates Kubernetes to star enterprise status

A swag at how many new apps will be created to run on kubernetes cloud stuff. I assume this is actually existing, modernized apps and net-new ones despite the wording:

VMware says that from 2018 to 2023 – with new tools/platforms, more developers, agile methods, and lots of code reuse – 500 million new logical apps will be created serving the needs of many application types and spanning all types of environments.

Source: VMware plan elevates Kubernetes to star enterprise status

🗂 Link: VMware is bringing VMs and containers together, taking advantage of Heptio acquisition

“Kubernetes is a way of bringing a control metaphor to modern IT processes. You provide an expression of what you want to have happen, and then Kubernetes takes that and interprets it and drives the world into that desired state,” McLuckie explained.

More from another article:

The Tanzu portfolio also includes Project Galleon, which harnesses the packaging technology of VMware’s recent acquisition of Bitnami, to provide developers with an easy way to assemble software stacks. It will include a Platform as a Service development platform on its pending purchase of Pivotal. It also includes VMware Tanzu Mission Control, which will provide administrators with an overview of all Kubernetes clusters.

Source: VMware is bringing VMs and containers together, taking advantage of Heptio acquisition

🗂 Link: Scale and velocity are driving the next generation of DevOps

This massive growth in scale has required an evolution in practices and organization to achieve success. Most of what technologists are aware of in this regard is labeled “DevOps,” but there is more nuance to it than that. The way infrastructure capacity is allocated becomes decoupled from specific hardware, so the infrastructure team has to adapt new tools. The way databases and message busses, among other things, are operated and made available to applications has become more “self-service”, and thus those teams have to see themselves as service providers rather than as infrastructure teams.

Source: Scale and velocity are driving the next generation of DevOps

Link: Ignore the hysteria, Cloud Foundry is just fine

Sure you can do a lot of things with Kubernetes. It’s great, but Cloud Foundry is designed to make “Happy developers,” as Comcast open-source senior director Nithya Ruff put it at the Cloud Foundry Summit.

Cloud Foundry’s audience, as Karl Isenberg, one of its developers, explained on StackOverflow, is “enterprise application devs who want to deploy 12-factor stateless apps using Heroku-style buildpacks.”

Source: Ignore the hysteria, Cloud Foundry is just fine

Link: Comic Relief switched from multi-cloud to serverless with AWS and saw a 93% cost reduction

As a team, going serverless has given us a lot more velocity, we can rapidly release, we can test the same infrastructure we’re deploying in production, in a pull request environment, in a staging environment, we can rapidly retest ideas- and every developer can do that because we’re using Lambda to load test, so the power it gives you as a developer and engineering team is pretty amazing.

Source: Comic Relief switched from multi-cloud to serverless with AWS and saw a 93% cost reduction

Link: Cloud Foundry Project Eirini Inches the Group Closer to Kubernetes

“A lot of work needs to be done for that but it’s evolving quickly,” Childers said of interoperability tests using Eirini as a bridge between Diego and Kubernetes. He did add that the evolution from Diego to Eirini, if it does occur, will be similar to how Cloud Foundry moved from its DEA architecture system to its Diego architecture system. That involved Diego having to show functional parity to DEA and the necessary production readiness for vendors and organizations to feel comfortable using Diego in place of DEA.

Source: Cloud Foundry Project Eirini Inches the Group Closer to Kubernetes

Link: SUSE on Cloud 9 for love-in with OpenStack and Kubernetes

> With the Cloud Application Platform 1.4, SUSE has set its sights on a multi-cloud world laying claim to being the first software distribution to go 100 per cent Kubernetes for Cloud Foundry.
>
> …
>
> The juice comes from Cloud Foundry’s Project Eirini, which allows devs to seamlessly switch between Kubernetes or Cloud Foundry Diego as their container scheduler. An organisation already invested in the Kubernetes world therefore does not have to faff around with the Cloud Foundry Application Runtime orchestration. A single scheduler should do the trick.

Source: SUSE on Cloud 9 for love-in with OpenStack and Kubernetes

Link: Add It Up: FaaS ≠ Serverless

Despite attempts to educate the market, we still believe the word “serverless” connotes many different things, especially for the 79 percent of organizations that plan to adopt serverless architecture but have not planned to use FaaS in the next 18 months.

Oh boy.
Original source: Add It Up: FaaS ≠ Serverless

Link: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.3

A laundry list of new feature and services in the software I market around. There’s a lot of .Net expansion, adding some standard platform services (like a task scheduler), and Morlock stuff like multi-install (would you say “zone”?) OpenStack, and Kubernetes and embedded OS update:
Original source: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.3

Link: VMworld 2018: VMware Wants to Re-Architect Your Containers for NSX – The New Stack

“The developer shouldn’t have to know how to program NSX, or know what the security isolation boundaries are,” continued Fazzone. “But they should know that their organization has taken steps to unify the networking approach between the containerized applications and the traditional applications running in VMs, and take advantage of that ‘service’ offered by IT to extend the NSX-T support up into their container platform, versus just defaulting to the Layer 2 default that’s available in the open source community — so that their organization can realize that complete connectivity model in a consistent way.”
Original source: VMworld 2018: VMware Wants to Re-Architect Your Containers for NSX – The New Stack

Link: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

“Harbor is a privately hosted registry, which allows running either on-premises or in any of the major cloud vendors, making it a possibility for organizations that cannot use a public container registry or want to implement a multi-cloud strategy. Harbor started as an internal VMware project and became open source in 2016. Multiple partners, including companies like Pivotal and Rancher, either use Harbor for their container-based environment or work together with Harbor to give the possibility of running the project on their infrastructure. For instance, the Pivotal Container Service includes Harbor as its built-in container registry. For Rancher, Harbor is one of the packages you can deploy to provide a container registry. Moreover, Harbor gives the option to set up multiple instances of these registries on several of these platforms simultaneously and allows replication between them. Through the signing and vulnerability scanning capabilities provided by the project, it turns these into trusted resources.”
Original source: Cloud Native Computing Foundation Accepts Harbor Into CNCF Sandbox

Link: Google sets Kubernetes free with $9m in its pocket for expenses

“CNCF has reason to be magnanimous beyond the Chocolate Factory prize money – cloud-oriented enterprise software is all the rage. According to CNCF stats published on Wednesday, production usage of CNCF projects has increased more than 200 per cent on average since December 2017 and evaluation – companies testing said code – has risen 372 per cent…. Among CNCF survey respondents – 2,400 IT-types mostly from the US and Europe – 40 per cent of those from enterprise companies (5,000+ employees) report running Kubernetes in production. Over the whole set of people answering the survey, 58 per cent said they are using Kubernetes in production, with 42 per cent considering it for future deployment.”
Original source: Google sets Kubernetes free with $9m in its pocket for expenses

Link: What Will Be the Real Impact From Knative?

“Knative is using the market momentum behind Kubernetes to provide an established platform on which to support serverless deployments that can run across different public clouds.”
Original source: What Will Be the Real Impact From Knative?

Link: What Will Be the Real Impact From Knative?

“Knative is using the market momentum behind Kubernetes to provide an established platform on which to support serverless deployments that can run across different public clouds.”
Original source: What Will Be the Real Impact From Knative?

Link: GKE On-Prem

Networking considered hard: “The amusing thing is that they wanted to connect a GKE On-Prem install running on VSphere for the demo. They could not get a public IP, so they just used MiniKube. Frankly, I think the demo at #GoogleNext2018 was far more amazing connecting MiniKube.”
Original source: GKE On-Prem

Link: Istio Aims To Be The Mesh Plumbing For Containerized Microservices

“The latter piece can be the tricky one when using containers to develop microservices. How do you link up all the component parts when they may be spread across a cluster of server nodes, and instances of them are continually popping up and later being retired as they are replaced by updated versions? In a service-oriented architecture (SOA), which microservices can be seen as the evolutionary heir to, this kind of task is analogous to that taken care of by an enterprise service bus (ESB). So what is needed is a kind of cloud-native version of an ESB…. This is the job that Istio, a relatively new open source project, aims to fill. It is officially described as a service mesh, because parts of it are distributed across the infrastructure alongside the containers it manages, and it sets out to meet the requirements of service discovery, load balancing, message routing, telemetry, and monitoring – and, of course, security.”
Original source: Istio Aims To Be The Mesh Plumbing For Containerized Microservices