Platforms are hard to sell, apps easier

Kevin Ichhpurani, executive vice president of global ecosystem and channels at GE Digital, and corporate officer of GE, told CRN during GE’s Minds and Machines conference in San Francisco last week that channel partners will have more success developing and selling applications around IoT, as opposed to grappling with the long and complex sales cycle of the GE Predix IoT platform itself.

Source: GE Digital Pivots Industrial IoT Sales Focus From Platform To IoT Apps — And Looks To Partners As Sales Engine

IBM’s new Private Cloud Stack, it’s got the Kubernetes & Containers

This week, Big Blue rolled out its new IBM Cloud Private software platform that is designed to enable enterprises to develop on-premises private cloud environments to accelerate app development and allow for easier movement of workloads between their private clouds and public clouds – not only the IBM Cloud but also those from other vendors. Similarly, IBM is leaning on open and container-based technologies for enhanced integration and portability of workloads. The IBM Cloud Private platform is built on Kubernetes, an open-source technology for container orchestration, and will support both Docker containers and Cloud Foundry framework.

More:

IBM Cloud Private can run on a variety of infrastructures, including the vendor’s own mainframe and Power systems, its hyperconverged infrastructure that runs Nutanix software, and IBM Storage’s Spectrum Access solution. In addition, it can run on systems from Dell EMC, Lenovo, Cisco Systems and NetApp, and can be deployed by such VMware, Canonical and other OpenStack distributions as well as bare-metal systems. The private cloud platform also includes such developer services for data analytics as Db2, Db2 Warehouse, PostgreSQL and MongoDB, developer tools like Netcool, UrbanCode, and Cloud Brokerage and open-source management software such as Jenkins, Prometheus, Grafana, and ElasticSearch.

Source: IBM Builds Private Cloud Stack With Kubernetes And Containers

Pivotal Conversations: Debunking Cloud Foundry Myths

Our podcast this week:

There’s a whole slurry of myths about Cloud Foundry. With the platform updating so quickly, many of the issues behind these myths have long been addressed, and many were just false from the get-go. Coté and Richard talk about a recent post dismissing common myths. We also discuss recent news from the infrastructure software world and go over a bunch of upcoming events that Pivotal will be at.

If you use something like Overcast, be sure to check out the overly-extensive chapters and links right inside the podcast.

You should subscribe to the podcast!

Cloud Foundry’s Vision: A Services Ecosystem that Transcends Containers

“What’s the whole point of Cloud Foundry? It’s an abstraction on infrastructure,” stated Kearns. “And really, if you net it even further down, the whole point is to absolve organizations — particularly, traditional, non-tech organizations — from undifferentiating heavy lifting. What that means is, working on things that are not relevant or differentiating for your business.

Also, much discussion of the history of service broker/registries.

Link

SUSE to Acquire HPE’s OpenStack, Cloud Foundry Portfolio, Boost Kubernetes Investment, TheNewStack

“We see PaaS as a strategic component of our software-defined infrastructure and application platform strategy,” stated SUSE President of Strategy, Alliances and Marketing Michael Miller, in a note to The New Stack, “and Cloud Foundry as the open source project and technology that brings together the best innovation and industry collaboration. We want to leverage that innovation for the benefit of our customers, and we have a vision for the convergence of CaaS technologies [in SUSE’s case, Containers as a service] like Docker and Kubernetes and PaaS technologies like Cloud Foundry that we think will address the real-world needs of our customers and partners. We will now work with the Cloud Foundry community to develop that vision.”

http://thenewstack.io/suse-add-hpes-openstack-cloud-foundry-portfolio-boost-kubernetes-investment/

065: The High-level WTF on “Scheduling”

We spend this week talking about workload scheduling, starting with Mesos. It’s a fun ride from CONTROL-M to Lambda, along with Cloud Foundry and serverless. So get ready to beat a horse into glue. Plus, how to handle gifts for father’s day and the usual recommendations at the end.

Check out the full show notes for links to the recommendations, conferences, and tech news items we didn’t get to cover.

Listen above, subscribe to the feed (or iTunes), or download the MP3 directly.

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

SPONSOR

Show notes

Father’s Day

MesosCon

  • Platform Infrastructure at Twitter: The Past, Present and – Future – Chris Pinkham, VP of Engineering, Twitter
  • Forgot to talk about this, but here are my notes from the MesosCon presentation by Twitter
  • Former Nimbula founder (Oracle acquisition), early AWS founder.
  • Twitter’s kinda big deal, maybe you’ve heard of them. Over 1000 services manage Twitter, over 1,000,000 cores.
  • http://twitter.github.io
  • Heron is a newly open-sourced replacement for Storm. Supporting all of our own code isn’t sustainable, need an open source community.
  • The Ellen Degeneres photo tweet from the 2015 Academy Awards knocked a couple of services over. 25% traffic spike, hit 255k/tweets per second. 2016 Academy Awards had 2x the traffic, no failures.
  • 30,000 node Mesos cluster (probably largest). “We don’t like being the biggest of anything, we find the edge cases.” 130,000,000 containers launched daily.
  • Some of their acquisitions were in public cloud, they don’t move them in-house. They’re actually pushing new services out to AWS where they can. Vine, TellApart, Crashlytics, MoPub, BlueFin, etc. Ad-serving is mostly in AWS.
    Users: Time Warner, Twitter (30,000 host deployment), Apple Siri.

What exactly is scheduling?

  • BMC CONTROL-M
  • Coté gets Matt to “checks out” his crudes understanding. (Spoiler: Checks out.)

Serverless, what’s the deal?

Mid-roll

BONUS LINKS!

Not covered in show:

Somebody’s using Kubernetes

  • Hear the tale!
  • Concur & Barkly Protects
  • Both shops did customizations to the codebase (AWS AZ & ELB support, Prometheus)

AWS & Australia News

Coté’s revamped Pivotal Conversations Podcast

Typosquatting Package Managers

  • Seriously messed up.
  • “In the thesis itself, several powerful methods to defend against typo squatting attacks are discussed. Therefore they are not included in this blog post.”

A Docker on every HPE Server

  • Running on HPE
  • Reference Architectures!
  • HPE 3PAR and SiteScope plugins!
  • Maybe Brandon can regale us with some history: tales of The Mercury Wars!
  • Also, some ALM stuff. Sadly, I don’t have access to the IDC reports on this, however, they’re expecting big things: “IDC’s analysis of this market resulted in worldwide agile application life-cycle management software 2014 revenue of $450.3 million, up 30.5% from the 2013 revenue of $345 million. IDC expects very strong growth for agile ALM software for the 2014–2019 time frame, with growth to $1.8 billion by 2019 and a high CAGR of 32%”
  • erry-one doin’ it! What’s up with Chef’s ALM/CD stuff? Pivotal circle of code vision, with ConcourseCI.

Recommendations

Link: Ford teams with Pivotal, bets on Cloud Foundry

“As for the Pivotal partnership, Ford will use Pivotal’s Cloud Foundry and big data suit e to build its connected vehicle program. So far, Ford said it has sped up software development times from months to weeks using agile techniques.”

Source: Ford teams with Pivotal, bets on Cloud Foundry

Automating the three ring binder, an example from the US Government

18F is fun the watch if you’re interested in transforming to cloud. In this FAQ about cloud.gov, their Cloud Foundry service, they talk about how they help speed up the slow meatware process of compliance:

A typical agency process to demonstrate compliance with FISMA and gain an ATO requires generation of a gigantic, copy-pasted document enumerating the full design of the system. We document all of the federally-required controls in every section of the cloud.gov platform in a software-friendly way. This enables us to generate different documents suitable to different contexts: human-readable, gap analysis, spreadsheet matrix, web page visualization, etc.

Any app deployed on cloud.gov will be able to leverage these “parts-included” descriptions to make generating their own documentation much easier; they only need to supply information about what their system adds on top of the PaaS. For more information, you can watch the recent DigitalGov University video on “Handling FISMA Faster and Better.”

There’s a few interesting things here:

  1. They automate as much of the process as possible, doing the copy and pasting for you. Now, this should make you question needing to do all that meatware work in the first place but…
  2. If you can’t beat the meatware process problem, join it and try to automate it. There’s probably some value in there, and even for the parts where there is no value, it might be a waste of effort to fight it (versus other ways to spend your resources of time and favors). 3. And, as I mention on my cloud strategy piece on dealing with legacy IT, perhaps by doing all this you can expose how silly it is and eliminate it.

(If you like this line of thinking, check out my webinar on Dec 1st in dealing with legacy IT in your cloud strategy.)