Link: Ignore the hysteria, Cloud Foundry is just fine

Sure you can do a lot of things with Kubernetes. It’s great, but Cloud Foundry is designed to make “Happy developers,” as Comcast open-source senior director Nithya Ruff put it at the Cloud Foundry Summit.

Cloud Foundry’s audience, as Karl Isenberg, one of its developers, explained on StackOverflow, is “enterprise application devs who want to deploy 12-factor stateless apps using Heroku-style buildpacks.”

Source: Ignore the hysteria, Cloud Foundry is just fine

Link: Users forge ahead with Cloud Foundry-Kubernetes integration

“There are a million solutions out there to your technical problems, but what we wanted was to solve the people and process problems,”

And:

“It depends on Pivotal. If they add a common pattern in the future for deployment with Istio and Envoy through a cluster and platform-agnostic service mesh, then, yes, we will combine them,” said another senior engineer at the carrier.

Source: Users forge ahead with Cloud Foundry-Kubernetes integration

Link: Cloud Foundry Project Eirini Inches the Group Closer to Kubernetes

“A lot of work needs to be done for that but it’s evolving quickly,” Childers said of interoperability tests using Eirini as a bridge between Diego and Kubernetes. He did add that the evolution from Diego to Eirini, if it does occur, will be similar to how Cloud Foundry moved from its DEA architecture system to its Diego architecture system. That involved Diego having to show functional parity to DEA and the necessary production readiness for vendors and organizations to feel comfortable using Diego in place of DEA.

Source: Cloud Foundry Project Eirini Inches the Group Closer to Kubernetes

Link: SUSE on Cloud 9 for love-in with OpenStack and Kubernetes

> With the Cloud Application Platform 1.4, SUSE has set its sights on a multi-cloud world laying claim to being the first software distribution to go 100 per cent Kubernetes for Cloud Foundry.
>
> …
>
> The juice comes from Cloud Foundry’s Project Eirini, which allows devs to seamlessly switch between Kubernetes or Cloud Foundry Diego as their container scheduler. An organisation already invested in the Kubernetes world therefore does not have to faff around with the Cloud Foundry Application Runtime orchestration. A single scheduler should do the trick.

Source: SUSE on Cloud 9 for love-in with OpenStack and Kubernetes

Link: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.5, Now GA, Harnesses the Power of Istio and Envoy to Make Your Developers More Productive

Whole lotta features:

> – Weighted routing uses Istio and Envoy to simplify blue-green deployments (beta)
> – Platform Automation for PCF, the engine of your perpetual upgrade machine (beta)
> – Windows Server 2019, Microsoft’s most container-friendly OS yet, now powers PAS for Windows (coming soon)
> – Consume upstream Kubernetes your way with the new PKS family
> – Got apps that need multiple custom ports? Run ‘em on PAS.
> – Use metadata on API resources throughout PAS to share context
> – Keep tabs on all your apps, wherever they run with multi-foundation Apps Manager (coming soon)
> – Steeltoe 2.2 improves the stability of your microservices, simplifies connections to MongoDB
> – Spring Cloud Data Flow for PCF 1.4: Wire up data pipelines across Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry (coming soon)
> – Single Sign-On for PCF 1.9 will help you get more done faster with a new, streamlined dashboard (coming soon)
> – Detecting manifest changes with Ops Manager is much easier
> – Other Enhancements
> – Public Service Announcements
> – Try Pivotal Cloud Foundry for Free

Source: Pivotal Cloud Foundry 2.5, Now GA, Harnesses the Power of Istio and Envoy to Make Your Developers More Productive

Link: Cloud Foundry Cult

Owen covers CF Summit Basel:

“The users we spoke with didn’t just see it as a PaaS – it was the underlying philosophy of application delivery and management upon which future developments would be based. The Foundation claims Cloud Foundry saves, on average, 10 weeks of development time and $100,000 per app development cycle. In fact, in its own survey, 92% of users cite cross-platform flexibility as important. If these panelists are gaining such benefits, it’s easy to understand why they are so enamored with it.”
Original source: Cloud Foundry Cult

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

Link: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

‘IBM is pushing their cloud hard than ever before. Even though it is mostly IBM Cloud Private, this is the first time I heard a more consistent hybrid cloud story. They have moved away from OpenStack (completely) and CloudFoundry (for the most part) and building a good hybrid cloud story using Kubernetes. Both he product team and services team seem to be quite excited about the opportunity Kubernetes offers them. Kubernetes on Bare Metal as a service is a step in the right direction. Unlike OpenStack and, to some extent, CloudFoundry, Kubernetes gives IBM a chance to have a more unified story from their infrastructure assets to middleware assets. Their “One Cloud Architecture” push is directed in this direction and helps IBM tell a consistent story across their entire portfolio.’
Original source: Finally, a more coherent IBM story?

Link: Container orchestration top trumps: Let’s just pretend you don’t use Kubernetes already

Overview of container orchestration and platform options, brief.
Original source: Container orchestration top trumps: Let’s just pretend you don’t use Kubernetes already

Link: Meltdown and Spectre underscore the ongoing need for infrastructure automation

“In the Cloud Foundry scenario, these are embodied by BOSH to automate the infrastructure resource, namely VMs, container clusters, virtual storage and networks, configuration and deployment and Concourse for the development pipeline. Together, these enable organizations to rapidly and consistently patch all applications using the PaaS environment. Together, these enable organizations to rapidly and consistently patch all applications using the PaaS environment.”
Original source: Meltdown and Spectre underscore the ongoing need for infrastructure automation

Platforms are hard to sell, apps easier

Kevin Ichhpurani, executive vice president of global ecosystem and channels at GE Digital, and corporate officer of GE, told CRN during GE’s Minds and Machines conference in San Francisco last week that channel partners will have more success developing and selling applications around IoT, as opposed to grappling with the long and complex sales cycle of the GE Predix IoT platform itself.

Source: GE Digital Pivots Industrial IoT Sales Focus From Platform To IoT Apps — And Looks To Partners As Sales Engine

IBM’s new Private Cloud Stack, it’s got the Kubernetes & Containers

This week, Big Blue rolled out its new IBM Cloud Private software platform that is designed to enable enterprises to develop on-premises private cloud environments to accelerate app development and allow for easier movement of workloads between their private clouds and public clouds – not only the IBM Cloud but also those from other vendors. Similarly, IBM is leaning on open and container-based technologies for enhanced integration and portability of workloads. The IBM Cloud Private platform is built on Kubernetes, an open-source technology for container orchestration, and will support both Docker containers and Cloud Foundry framework.

More:

IBM Cloud Private can run on a variety of infrastructures, including the vendor’s own mainframe and Power systems, its hyperconverged infrastructure that runs Nutanix software, and IBM Storage’s Spectrum Access solution. In addition, it can run on systems from Dell EMC, Lenovo, Cisco Systems and NetApp, and can be deployed by such VMware, Canonical and other OpenStack distributions as well as bare-metal systems. The private cloud platform also includes such developer services for data analytics as Db2, Db2 Warehouse, PostgreSQL and MongoDB, developer tools like Netcool, UrbanCode, and Cloud Brokerage and open-source management software such as Jenkins, Prometheus, Grafana, and ElasticSearch.

Source: IBM Builds Private Cloud Stack With Kubernetes And Containers

Cloud Foundry’s Vision: A Services Ecosystem that Transcends Containers

“What’s the whole point of Cloud Foundry? It’s an abstraction on infrastructure,” stated Kearns. “And really, if you net it even further down, the whole point is to absolve organizations — particularly, traditional, non-tech organizations — from undifferentiating heavy lifting. What that means is, working on things that are not relevant or differentiating for your business.

Also, much discussion of the history of service broker/registries.

Link

SUSE to Acquire HPE’s OpenStack, Cloud Foundry Portfolio, Boost Kubernetes Investment, TheNewStack

“We see PaaS as a strategic component of our software-defined infrastructure and application platform strategy,” stated SUSE President of Strategy, Alliances and Marketing Michael Miller, in a note to The New Stack, “and Cloud Foundry as the open source project and technology that brings together the best innovation and industry collaboration. We want to leverage that innovation for the benefit of our customers, and we have a vision for the convergence of CaaS technologies [in SUSE’s case, Containers as a service] like Docker and Kubernetes and PaaS technologies like Cloud Foundry that we think will address the real-world needs of our customers and partners. We will now work with the Cloud Foundry community to develop that vision.”

http://thenewstack.io/suse-add-hpes-openstack-cloud-foundry-portfolio-boost-kubernetes-investment/

Link: Cloud Foundry poised to shine in 2016, Chris Talbot

“Based on the articles I wrote and the people I spoke with in 2015, I’d say 2016 is going to be a good one for Cloud Foundry, as well as for PaaS in general. Compared to SaaS and IaaS, PaaS is still quite small, but it’s growing.”

Source: Cloud Foundry poised to shine in 2016, Chris Talbot

Link: Ford teams with Pivotal, bets on Cloud Foundry

“As for the Pivotal partnership, Ford will use Pivotal’s Cloud Foundry and big data suit e to build its connected vehicle program. So far, Ford said it has sped up software development times from months to weeks using agile techniques.”

Source: Ford teams with Pivotal, bets on Cloud Foundry

Automating the three ring binder, an example from the US Government

18F is fun the watch if you’re interested in transforming to cloud. In this FAQ about cloud.gov, their Cloud Foundry service, they talk about how they help speed up the slow meatware process of compliance:

A typical agency process to demonstrate compliance with FISMA and gain an ATO requires generation of a gigantic, copy-pasted document enumerating the full design of the system. We document all of the federally-required controls in every section of the cloud.gov platform in a software-friendly way. This enables us to generate different documents suitable to different contexts: human-readable, gap analysis, spreadsheet matrix, web page visualization, etc.

Any app deployed on cloud.gov will be able to leverage these “parts-included” descriptions to make generating their own documentation much easier; they only need to supply information about what their system adds on top of the PaaS. For more information, you can watch the recent DigitalGov University video on “Handling FISMA Faster and Better.”

There’s a few interesting things here:

  1. They automate as much of the process as possible, doing the copy and pasting for you. Now, this should make you question needing to do all that meatware work in the first place but…
  2. If you can’t beat the meatware process problem, join it and try to automate it. There’s probably some value in there, and even for the parts where there is no value, it might be a waste of effort to fight it (versus other ways to spend your resources of time and favors). 3. And, as I mention on my cloud strategy piece on dealing with legacy IT, perhaps by doing all this you can expose how silly it is and eliminate it.

(If you like this line of thinking, check out my webinar on Dec 1st in dealing with legacy IT in your cloud strategy.)

Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.6, getting beyond the blinking cursor into the application layer

There’s a new release of Pivotal Cloud Foundry out this week. We’ve been seeing great pick-up from customers, and the nature of conversations I’ve been seeing while visiting them has been changing from operations, IaaS-driven topics to discussions about improving application development and delivery. This release also reflects that shift “up the stack.” Here’s my brief take on how things are going for Pivotal Cloud Foundry.

The most typical path to using Pivotal Cloud Foundry

First, this is how I see most customers arriving at Pivotal Cloud Foundry:

Who does Pivotal see as their toughest competition? According to Watters, that distinction belongs to AWS. Cloud customers often believe that AWS itself is enough. [James] Watters says that there wouldn’t even be the concept of cloud-native apps without Amazon, but “people need more than just Amazon to be successful.” Watters believes that some of Pivotal’s best customers are those who first tried to creates platforms themselves, but then asked “what’s the right thing to do for my organization?”

The rest of the piece is a good, brief overview of the new feature in Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.6.

What I see in this release is a movement “up the stack” to address application architecture and development concerns. You can see this in the incorporation of Spring Cloud (which supports, among many other things, a microservices approach), support for .Net (almost every large organization wants and needs this for the way they develop applications), and the numerous integrations with ALM tools (like Cloudbees, GitLabs, etc.).

For many years – and still! – the focus of “cloud” has been on the infrastructure layer: setting up the “operating system” for the cloud, your big datacenter, and everything that results in that magical blinking cursor:

I think of this as the “blinking cursor” problem. You know that softly pulsing cursor: it’s the result of millions ­—if not billions! — of dollars spent on cloud projects. These “private cloud” projects see companies redoing how their IT department provides infrastructure. They move from physical to virtual management; move from manual ticket processing to self­-service, automated provisioning; and after efforts that must have seemed like building all of the furniture for a new IKEA store with just a pocket knife, they might end up with their own cloud. And then, after all of this, they’ve gotten the blinking cursor up! The servers are ready to use! Now the hard work of designing, developing, deploying, and managing the applications that run the business starts. There is little wonder that 95% of folks in [a poll asking “what went wrong with your private cloud project?”] were not completely satisfied with their private cloud projects.

I still see much of the conversation centering around getting the blinking curser up, and too little on how to create and manage good applications. So, obviously I like our new positioning “up the stack,” not only providing application-centric services, cloud-ified middleware, and the operations capabilities needed keep those application up and running.

In addition to the actual product, you can see this reflected on the team (the evangelist/advocate/community team) I’m on where we’ve added people who focus on explaining how to do better software development, in addition to the more operations-centric people we started with.

Momentum: customer and ecosystem growth and character

Momentum wise, I measure Pivotal Cloud Foundry based on customers and the overall Cloud Foundry ecosystem.

Customer wise, we’ve gone from about $40m in bookings in 2014 to a $100m annual bookings run-rate this year. Those are two, slightly different type numbers, but you can get a feel for the amount of business we’ve been doing, and more important, the high growth and fast traction we’re getting. What I like about out customer base is that they’re everyday, big brands and companies. This not only means I can better explain what I do to my non-tech friends and relatives, but also means we have a sustainable customer base: these Global 2,000 customers aren’t going away anytime soon, esp. if they keep up the strategy that brought them to Pivotal Cloud Foundry: transforming to a software defined business.

There’s a Cloud Foundry Summit this week in Berlin and it evidenced the ecosystem momentum around Cloud Foundry, the open source project that Pivotal Cloud Foundry is based on. There’s now just north of 50 members. When you look at those logos notice how many non-tech companies are on there: it’s still mostly tech companies who want to use or extend Cloud Foundry, but there’s a delightful number of non-tech companies who want to support the platform that’s supporting their business. And, of course, the work with Microsoft to support .Net brings that whole ecosystem very close as well. As I mentioned above, many of the every organization I talk with really wants .Net support. Another interesting thing to watch is growth in use of Azure; that’s an option that I hear companies exploring a lot now-a-days, and, indeed, as Microsoft said in the press around this release, “[t]he demand for Azure was so high that we already have Fortune 100 customers building their next-generation applications with Pivotal Cloud Foundry on Azure.”

Obviously, working at Pivotal I’m highly biased on all this. Still, I think there’s good evidence that things are panning out. My main hope, as always, is that we can help improve the state of software, globally, and, thus, improve how organizations are operating.

More on Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.6:

Cloud Native Journey Series

I’ve been working on a series of blog posts on “the cloud native journey.” I put that in quotes because it’s admittedly a cheesy marketing phrase. The point of it is: if you’re looking to start using all these new cloud-based ideas for improving how your company does custom software development, what’s that look like. You know, what’s the “journey.”

Cutter Survey

All four parts are now up:

  1. The introduction to the series
  2. The Purity & Tyranny Of A Blank Screen: The Greenfield Journey – see also a recording of my webinar on this section, also the slides.
  3. Dealing With The Stuff That Makes All The Money: The Legacy Journeycheck the recording of the webinar on this section, too. Also, the slides.
  4. The Cloud Native Journey: Enterprise Transformation – check out the recording of the webinar on this part. Also, the slides.

There’s also a PDF of the whole thing if you prefer that format.

Tell me what you think of it!