Link: Worldwide Public Cloud Services Spending Forecast to Reach $160 Billion This Year, According to IDC

Includes an interesting chart that lists the types of services/features (like data management and appdev platforms) that compose vendor revenue. Plus geographic and vertical rankings. But, just a press release.
Original source: Worldwide Public Cloud Services Spending Forecast to Reach $160 Billion This Year, According to IDC

Link: Amazon lost cloud market share to Microsoft in the fourth quarter: KeyBanc

For 4Q2017: “Amazon Web Services had 62 percent market share in the quarter, down from 68 percent a year earlier, KeyBanc’s Brent Bracelin and other analysts wrote in a note on Thursday. Microsoft Azure jumped from 16 percent to 20 percent, and Google’s share increased from 10 percent to 12 percent, they said.”
Original source: Amazon lost cloud market share to Microsoft in the fourth quarter: KeyBanc

Link: Cisco is strengthening its ‘cloud first’ posture

Finally, an explanation of that Cisco/Google partnership:

“CloudCenter is key to the hybrid cloud partnership that Cisco and Google recently announced, where CloudCenter will be used to integrate Google Cloud Platform services with on-premises datacenters. The integrated offering includes Cisco’s Hyperflex hyperconverged infrastructure and Nexus 9k networking. Cisco is also leveraging its networking (CSR) and security (Stealthwatch Cloud) portfolio to ensure a consistent environment across the hybrid cloud. Google’s Kubernetes container runtime uses Apigee to consume and manage APIs, as well as Google’s range of cloud services, including machine learning and visual recognition. The open source Istio service management platform is key to the offering, supported in CloudCenter, providing traffic management, observability, policy enforcement and service identity and security for microservices. There will also be integrations to AppDynamics. Solution engineering efforts are underway, and Cisco and Google are working on predefined statements of work that can be executed by both companies’ direct sales teams and by the partner channels. The joint offering will be fully supported by the Cisco Technical Assistance Center. The Cisco-Google partnership on hybrid cloud is non-exclusive, but Google is working closely with Cisco on the joint engineering work around open hybrid cloud.”

Original source: Cisco is strengthening its ‘cloud first’ posture

Multi-Cloud Begets Confusion, Calls for Automation

One reason is confusion over how enterprises define multi-cloud: Just over half of those polled defined it as including a combination of either public or private clouds along with on-premise infrastructure. (That is also a widely accepted definition of “hybrid clouds”.) Meanwhile, 23 percent of respondents said multi-cloud includes all three: public and private clouds along with their own datacenters.

Source: Multi-Cloud Begets Confusion, Calls for Automation

OpenStack Continues to Grow Both Public and Private Cloud Deployments

Four years ago, in October 2013, 451 Research reported that OpenStack cloud revenues were approximately $600 million in 2013. In April 2016, 451 Research reported that 2015 OpenStack ecosystem revenues came in at $1.2 billion, with a forecast to grow to $3.37 billion by 2018.

Now in November 2017, 451 Research is out with it latest OpenStack market sizing report, estimating 2017 OpenStack ecosystem revenue at $2.6 billion. Looking forward, 451 Research is forecasting that OpenStack market revenues will reach $6.7 billion by 2021

Source: OpenStack Continues to Grow Both Public and Private Cloud Deployments

Better details on the Cisco/Google partnership around kubernetes and Istio

The cloud initiative combines Google’s de facto standard Kubernetes cluster orchestration platform for managing applications and services across hybrid infrastructure with Cisco’s networking and security expertise. It also leverages Cisco’s push into hyper-converged infrastructure. Along with extending security to application containers and other micro-services, the deal would allow users to monitor application behavior running on hybrid platforms, the partners said.

The other pillar of the collaboration is Istio, another open source tool released earlier this year to help manage micro-services via what developers call a “service mesh network.” Working with Kubernetes, Istio aims to provide a uniform means of connecting and managing micro-services.

And, more here:

The companies will offer the joint solution to a limited number of customers during the first part of 2018 with generally availability coming later in the year.

Source: Cisco, Google Join Forces on Hybrid Cloud

Oracle’s public cloud momentum

Oracle reports its PaaS and IaaS revenue together, which makes understanding its IaaS growth difficult. FY16 to FY17 revenue increased from $0.9bn to $1.4bn, equivalent to 60% YoY growth. The company claims to have added 14,000 IaaS and PaaS customers to OCI since its inception, almost all of them existing customers of its licensed software. Oracle’s overall revenue in 2016 was $37bn, so IaaS and PaaS still represent a small slice of the pie.

The report has, of course, more detail on the portfolio, e.g.:

A challenge Oracle faced from the beginning was its tardiness to the market. Sure, it could copy and perhaps improve upon existing public cloud offerings, but it would have to do it faster than the rest of the market. AWS, for example, has over 70 services, so there is a lot of ground to cover. Over the past year, Oracle has released 50 services and features – starting from bare-metal compute and storage, the company has added virtual machines, databases, database clustering, load balancers, audit capability, compliance, monitoring, logging, authentication and new images. From a single datacenter in Phoenix, it has expanded to Ashburn, Virginia, and Frankfurt; it is targeting London for early 2018 and APAC further down the line. It has also released and open-sourced a new serverless capability called Fn and a Docker-native platform called Fn Flow for composing serverless applications. The company hopes to distinguish its serverless offering by making it cloud-agnostic, although Java is first among equals in terms of supported languages. Oracle realizes that its capability isn’t as broad as AWS’s, but its rate of development shows it can achieve a lot in a short amount of time.

And:

In 451 Research’s Voice of the Enterprise: Hosting & Cloud Managed Services, Organizational Dynamics 2017 report, 44% of 515 respondents stated that they would pay a premium for an enhanced SLA on performance/uptime; 34% stated that they would pay a premium for enhanced customer support. The median premium for these enhancements was about 20%. Buyers see value in services way beyond just the basics. The challenge for Oracle is convincing customers that it offers the best capability for the best price – there are others in the market with stronger credentials and reputations. stronger credentials and reputations.

Source: Oracle stays the course on IaaS

2017 Cloud Foundry Application Runtime Survey – Highlights

There’s a new survey out from the Cloud Foundry Foundation, looking at the users of Cloud Foundry. Here’s some highlights and notes:

  • Another ClearPath joint, n=735.
  • It’s important to keep in mind that this is covers all distress of Cloud Foundry, including open source (no vendor involved).
  • “The percentage of user respondents who require over three months
    per app drops from 51 percent to 18 percent after deploying Cloud Foundry Application Runtime”
  • “…while the percentage of user respondents who require less than a week climbs from 16 percent to 46 percent.”
  • “Nearly half (49 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are large enterprises ($1+ billion annual revenue).”
  • This chart is hard to read, but it shows a reduction in time to deploy across various time periods:
    before-after-release.
  • Uptake is early, but there are definitely mature users: “A plurality of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users (61 percent) describe their deployments as somewhere in the early stages—trial, PoC, evaluation, or a partial integration into specific business units. Meanwhile, 39 percent have deployed Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly across their company, from total integration in specific business groups to company-wide deployment.”
  • “Comcast, for example has more than 1500 developers using Cloud Foundry Application Runtime daily. Home Depot reports more than 2500 developers.”
  • “Comcast has seen between 50 percent and 75 percent improvement in productivity.”
  • “Half of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users are currently using containers, such as Docker or rkt, with another 35 percent evaluating or deploying containers.”
  • Container management – there’s a wide variety of tools that people use for container orchestration, including DIY (14%). There’s a lot of interest in having CF do it: “Nearly three-quarters (71 percent) of Cloud Foundry Application Runtime users currently using or evaluating containers are interested in adding container orchestration and management to their Cloud Foundry Application Runtime environment.” Hence, validating the Cloud Foundry Container Runtime.
  • Of course, the surveyed are already CF users, so they’re biased/driven by what they know.
  • Almost half of respondents say that getting started with CF. But people end up liking it: “An overwhelming majority of users (83 percent) would recommend Cloud Foundry Application Runtime to a colleague, including 60 percent who would do so strongly.”
  • “As more companies roll out Cloud Foundry Application Runtime more broadly, the footprint continues to grow. Currently, 46 percent of users have more than 10 apps deployed on Cloud Foundry Application Runtime, including 18 percent with over 100 (and eight percent with over 500).” 4% have over 1,000 apps.
  • CF’s uses: “The primary use is for microservices (54 percent), followed by websites (38 percent), internal business applications (31 percent), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) (27 percent) and legacy software (eight percent).”
  • Validating multi-cloud: “60 percent say this is very important, and another 30 percent describe it as somewhat important.” Meanwhile, 53% are using more than one type of IaaS.