Link: Microsoft sees Red …Hat for OpenShift-on-Azure public cloud offering

‘Rollout of the partnership will occur in two phases, with Azure support for OpenShift Container Platform and Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure and Azure Stack available now. The jointly managed OpenShift on Azure project is slated to go into its preview phase “in the coming months.”’
Original source: Microsoft sees Red …Hat for OpenShift-on-Azure public cloud offering

Link: Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip. Repeat, an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip

An edge device in every home, office, street corner, etc.

“The way it works is like this: Microsoft makes its system-on-chip (SoC) blueprints available to chip designers, which fabricate the chipset and flog it to IoT device makers. These manufacturers slap the silicon in their products, and run Microsoft’s Linux-based Sphere OS along with their own software on the chip, which connects to Microsoft’s Azure Sphere running on Redmond’s cloud.

Sphere does things like make sure gizmos only run official firmware, and automatically pushes out and installs bug fixes on remote devices, and so on. In the process, the chipmaker moves more silicon, the device vendor gets a turnkey security service to show to customers, and Microsoft gets a cloud customer for the lifespan of the device.”
Original source: Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip. Repeat, an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip

Link: As it shifts cloud focus to platform services, Oracle tries to hold on to its database legacy

‘“the way Oracle plans on differentiating itself from Amazon is by offering a complete suite of platform services at a higher level than infrastructure services,” Ellison said. Open-source databases like MySQL and MongoDB have become very popular with developers in the cloud era, but there are still lots of companies running Oracle databases on their own hardware as well as companies that want to maintain application compatibility with Oracle but through Oracle’s cloud services.’
Original source: As it shifts cloud focus to platform services, Oracle tries to hold on to its database legacy

Link: IBM’s cloud strategy revolves around multi-cloud support, grabbing new workloads

‘Among the moving parts from IBM:

-The IBM Cloud Private platform will get cloud-migration tools with an “application transformation advisor” that scans applications and provides guidance on moving them to the cloud. Cloud Automation Manager will help deploy these applications on-premises or in a cloud of choice.

-Kubernetes container support is expanded. IBM Cloud Private will offer new container versions of IBM app development and management software. These container versions will cover API

-Connect, UrbanCode and Netcool. IBM also added new support for Windows containers running .Net apps.

-A cloud integration platform that includes messaging, API management, app integration, secure gateway and high-speed trial software.

Link: Why should Kubernetes be scared of AWS?

The scenario of AWS out-kubernetes kubernetes by layering another abstraction layer on-top of it to hide kubernetes from end-users “caring” about it: “In a not so distant future, users of container clusters will not care if they are using Kubernetes or under some AWS abstraction because it is the efficient way to do containers.”

Also, clever invocation or Xen as a historic analog.
Original source: Why should Kubernetes be scared of AWS?

Link: The Hidden Costs of Cloud Adoption

Despite it being aw some, you still have to pay for public cloud, and it’s pay as you go:

‘“Cloud is an inexpensive and easily accessible technology,” the infrastructure survey concludes. “People consume more, thereby spending more, and forget to control or limit their consumption.”‘

So:

“the market analyst found that 34 percent of enterprises polled said they have over the last year moved applications and data from a public cloud to either hosted private or on-premises private cloud.”
Original source: The Hidden Costs of Cloud Adoption