🗂 Link: The superpower to change one thing about Kubernetes

“It’s optimized for cloud native applications – those that follow the patterns that are in my book for example. That represents only a subset of the applications that our enterprise customers need to address. Our 2020 strategy is to broaden the definition of our platform. To be more than just Cloud Foundry, but to broaden it to a larger range of use cases. To broaden it to a larger market.”

Source: The superpower to change one thing about Kubernetes

🗂 Link: Waity K8-y no more Pivotal: We’ll unhook Application Service from VMware

“The urgency was more around understanding the long term vision than an immediate need,” said Andrews. “We’re still very early. Everybody is talking about K8s all the time, but if you look at who is actually using it in production, the list is much shorter. Our technology stack works incredibly well, we have customers with over 100,000 containers working on the current platform. If we forecast out 3 to 5 years in the future though, it seems clear that K8s is going to be a de facto component in the architecture.”

Source: Waity K8-y no more Pivotal: We’ll unhook Application Service from VMware

🗂 Link: Why would anyone need Cloud Foundry when we have Kubernetes? Um, ‘cos K8s is really hard!

Daimler’s Thomas Müller, platform architect, spoke this morning at the summit about his company’s migration from IBM WebSphere to Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF) and illustrated another point, that the typical enterprise has more to worry about than K8s support.

His company began its transition from WebSphere in 2015 and it took until March 2019 to go live with 50 or so applications on PCF.

Source: Why would anyone need Cloud Foundry when we have Kubernetes? Um, ‘cos K8s is really hard!

Link: Cloud Foundry Project Eirini Inches the Group Closer to Kubernetes

“A lot of work needs to be done for that but it’s evolving quickly,” Childers said of interoperability tests using Eirini as a bridge between Diego and Kubernetes. He did add that the evolution from Diego to Eirini, if it does occur, will be similar to how Cloud Foundry moved from its DEA architecture system to its Diego architecture system. That involved Diego having to show functional parity to DEA and the necessary production readiness for vendors and organizations to feel comfortable using Diego in place of DEA.

Source: Cloud Foundry Project Eirini Inches the Group Closer to Kubernetes

Eirini – Bringing Cloud Foundry & Kubernetes Together

Eirini For DevelopersFor Developers there are two big wins from Eirini. Firstly, if you want a Cloud Foundry cluster and you have access to Kubernetes but not VMs, Eirini lets you get it and kick the tires really fast. Secondly when you do need or want to pull the escape hatch and drop down to Kubernetes, everything you’ve cf push-ed is available as native Kubernetes objects under the covers.

Eirini For OperatorsThe big win from Eirini, though, is for Operators. Many platform operators already need to maintain a Kubernetes stack, for the stateless services their Cloud Foundry uses. Today, in order to provide an Easy Switch for developers, those operators need to manage two schedulers (Diego and Kubernetes), and any tooling and monitoring they use needs to be duplicated between the two. Deploying both the Diego and Kubernetes via Bosh can make this a bit better, but it doesn’t solve the bulk of the problem. Eirini standardises the underlying infrastructure so it’s all Kubernetes under the covers.

Source: The Fresh Prince of Cloud Native: Bringing Cloud Foundry & Kubernetes Together

Link: CF Summit Boston — Day 2 Wrap-Up – Brian McClain – Medium

In their PCF setup, T-Mobile has only 10 operators supporting 18,000 containers doing 10,000 transactions/second. This is spread over 1,700 developers. So:

“T-Mobile reports a 170:1 developer to operator ratio.”
Original source: CF Summit Boston — Day 2 Wrap-Up – Brian McClain – Medium

Link: My Interoperable Opinions of Cloud Foundry Summit 2018

“[I]n my previous life working in IT, I’ll admit I wasn’t in the opinionated camp. I didn’t even understand it as a concept. I generally went for selecting software with the ultimate flexibility. What I didn’t realize was how often this led to analysis paralysis and decreased productivity.”

I remember one of the last projects I worked on. We were selecting a software product for financial planning and reporting. Ideally, we’d have found a solution that did 80% of what was required. We should have reevaluated the actual importance of the other 20% we thought we needed. Instead, we focused on that 20% until we settled on something that could handle it. Then implementation details, changing requirements, and complex technology got in the way anyway. As I recently heard one industry analyst say, “Choice is not a differentiator.”
Original source: My Interoperable Opinions of Cloud Foundry Summit 2018

Making decisions quicker with failure

It’s okay to get things wrong and it’s okay to change our minds. If we’re strong enough to admit that we got it wrong, we can learn and adapt. If we accept that it’s okay to change our minds, we end up delivering something quicker as we made a decision based on the information at that time.

—Emma Hammond, Fidelity International

Source: Top 100 Quotes from the Cloud Foundry Summit Europe 2016, Altoros